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I'm trying to constrain that a many-to-many relationship between two entities ensures that those entities both share the same additional parent entity.

ie, Job, Claim, Category, ClaimCategory

Claim has one Job, Category has one Job, ClaimCategory has one Claim and one Category respectively.

A ClaimCategory row must ensure that both the Claim and Category belong to the same Job.

What I've done is added the columns ClaimJobId and CategoryJobId to the ClaimCategory table. The foreign keys to Claim are then the (ClaimId, ClaimJobId) and the foreign keys to Category are (CategoryId, CategoryJobId). I then add a constraint ensuring that ClaimJobId = CategoryJobId.

Is this the generally accepted best practice? Redundantly specifying the JobId in the join row seems wrong.

I'm using postgresql if that engine offers any unique options.

Thanks.

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I suppose I could add a unique constraint on the (ClaimId, JobId) of Claim, and the (CategoryId, JobId) of Category, and then I'd only need ONE JobId in the join table. I could have the foreign keys from the join be the (CategoryId, JobId) and (ClaimId, JobId) respectively. Is that better? –  Scott Sep 6 '13 at 22:04

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think a better solution is to add a unique constraint on the (ClaimId, JobId) of Claim, and the (CategoryId, JobId) of Category, and then I'd only need ONE JobId in the join table. I could have the foreign keys from the join be the (CategoryId, JobId) and (ClaimId, JobId) respectively.

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Yes, that's usually better (one column less and one CHECK constraint less.) See my answer here, which is similar requirements: Many to Many and Weak Entities –  ypercube Sep 8 '13 at 22:55

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