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I need to add prototype and then add scriptaculous and get a callback when they are both done loading. I am currently loading prototype like so:

var script = document.createElement("script");
script.src = "http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/prototype/1.6.1.0/prototype.js";
script.onload = script.onreadystatechange = callback;
document.body.appendChild( script );

I could do this by chaining the callbacks, but that seems like poor practice ( I don't want a silly chain of 20 callback methods when I need to load more scripts). Ideas?

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Why don't you add those script to a HTML insted of loading it with JavaScript? –  RaYell Dec 8 '09 at 12:45
2  
I am making a bit of code to be pasted into other people's html to embed my stuff. I only want an empty div and a reference to my javascript file to be pasted in. –  user199085 Dec 8 '09 at 12:46
    
@kdiegert: this reference to your js file pasted in: you mean via <script src="my.js"></script>? –  Crescent Fresh Dec 8 '09 at 13:51
    
yep, so the code to be pasted in would be: <div id="myDiv"></div><script src="my.js?arguments=arguments"></script> –  user199085 Dec 8 '09 at 14:16
    
css-tricks.com/snippets/javascript/… –  t1gor Nov 12 '14 at 16:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I propose you to use some small loader which will chain and do stuff for you. For example like this one:

function loadScripts(array,callback){
    var loader = function(src,handler){
        var script = document.createElement("script");
        script.src = src;
        script.onload = script.onreadystatechange = function(){
        script.onreadystatechange = script.onload = null;
        	handler();
        }
        var head = document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0];
        (head || document.body).appendChild( script );
    };
    (function(){
        if(array.length!=0){
        	loader(array.shift(),arguments.callee);
        }else{
        	callback && callback();
        }
    })();
}

This script should help you to build the script tags and call your callback when all files are loaded. Invoke is pretty easy:

loadScripts([
   "http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js",
   "http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/prototype/1.6.1.0/prototype.js"
],function(){
    alert('All things are loaded');
});

Hope this will help

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Bingo. Many thanks. –  user199085 Dec 8 '09 at 15:01
    
aysnc.parallel or async.series might help with this github.com/caolan/async –  Alex Mills Apr 8 at 3:59

Because of a bug in Internet Explorer the recursive loader program from nemisj is not working correct in IE. Can be solved by setting a delay on the recursive call like:


function loadScripts(array,callback){  
    var loader = function(src,handler){  
        var script = document.createElement("script");  
        script.src = src;  
        script.onload = script.onreadystatechange = function(){  
          script.onreadystatechange = script.onload = null;  
          if(/MSIE ([6-9]+\.\d+);/.test(navigator.userAgent))window.setTimeout(function(){handler();},8,this);  
          else handler();  
        }  
        var head = document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0];  
        (head || document.body).appendChild( script );  
    };  
    (function(){  
        if(array.length!=0){  
                loader(array.shift(),arguments.callee);  
        }else{  
                callback && callback();  
        }  
    })();  
}  

This small hack does it, and often is the solution in IE, when an unexplainable problem occurs, which is too often.

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Since scriptaculous requires prototype, you will have to chain the listeners, with whatever method you use to load these scripts.

There are various script loaders available to load scripts in parallel, as fast as possible, e.g. LABjs, but none is going to help much in this scenario.

If you end up having 10-20 scripts to load, I would recommend combining the scripts beforehand, using a tool such as a Combiner.

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actually, this scenario is exactly what LABjs was designed to solve. –  Kyle Simpson May 19 '11 at 20:36

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