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This Java method gets used in benchmarks for simulating slow computation:

static int slowItDown() {
    int result = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i <= 1000; i++) {
        result += i;
    }
    return result;
}

This is IMHO a very bad idea, as its body can get replaced by return 500500. This seems to never happen1; probably because of such an optimization being irrelevant for real code as Jon Skeet stated.

Interestingly, a slightly simpler method with result += 1; gets fully optimized away (caliper reports 0.460543 ns).

But even when we agree that optimizing away methods returning a constant result is useless for real code, there's still loop unrolling, which could lead to something like

static int slowItDown() {
    int result = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i <= 1000; i += 2) {
        result += 2 * i + 1;
    }
    return result;
}

So my question remains: Why is no optimization performed here?

1Contrary to what I wrote originally; I must have seen something what wasn't there.

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1  
How did you test this? If using the JIT you'll probably observe similar things by slightly changing the code, since there are lots of heuristics involved. You're no way guaranteed for the JIT to apply even the simplest optimizations like inlining as it only does so once deemed necessary. –  Janick Bernet Sep 6 '13 at 22:23
    
Is this real code? If you know what it's meant to return, why not just write the code that way? I'm content that JIT compilers are tuned to optimize real code rather than optimizing away code which wouldn't occur in reality. (Static optimizers have a bit more leeway than this, but remember that every optimization a JIT compiler tries to find has a cost at execution time*.) –  Jon Skeet Sep 6 '13 at 22:23
    
@JonSkeet: I observe, embarrassingly, that the link directs to Guava benchmarking code, which I would normally hope to trust... –  Louis Wasserman Sep 6 '13 at 22:26
    
return x + super.compareTo(e) - x; // silly attempt to prevent optimization. So they seem to be aware at least :) –  Janick Bernet Sep 6 '13 at 22:29
1  
@assylias: I can not reproduce the case of the method being optimized away! I'll give it one more try before I rewrite the question. –  maaartinus Sep 6 '13 at 23:16

1 Answer 1

Well, the JVM does optimize away such code. The question is how many times it has to be detected as a real hotspot (benchmarks do some more than this single method, usually) before it will be analyzed this way. In my setup it required 16830 invocations before the execution time went to (almost) zero.

It’s correct that such a code does not appear in real code. However it might remain after several inlining operations of other hotspots dealing with values not being compiling-time constants but runtime constants or de-facto constants (values that could change in theory but don’t practically). When such a piece of code remains it’s a great benefit to optimize it away entirely but that is not expected to happen soon, i.e. when calling right from the main method.

Update: I simplified the code and the optimization came even earlier.

public static void main(String[] args) {
  final int inner=10;
  final float innerFrac=1f/inner;
  int count=0; 
  for(int j=0; j<Integer.MAX_VALUE; j++) {
    long t0=System.nanoTime();
    for(int i=0; i<inner; i++) slowItDown();
    long t1=System.nanoTime();
    count+=inner;
    final float dt = (t1-t0)*innerFrac;
    System.out.printf("execution time: %.0f ns%n", dt);
    if(dt<10) break;
  }
  System.out.println("after "+count+" invocations");
  System.out.println(System.getProperty("java.version"));
  System.out.println(System.getProperty("java.vm.version"));
}
static int slowItDown() {
  int result = 0;
  for (int i = 1; i <= 1000; i++) {
      result += i;
  }
  return result;
}

execution time: 0 ns
after 15300 invocations
1.7.0_13
23.7-b01

(64Bit Server VM)

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Could you kindly post you code? I'm curious how it happened that it all got optimized away - a I wrote I thought it happened to me too, but now I think I was seeing something what wasn't there. –  maaartinus Sep 9 '13 at 15:01
    
It looks like the method gets optimized away rather than optimized (i.e., folded to a constant). I tried something like x += slowItDown() and print x at the end and the time went never below 300 ns. This corresponds with what you wrote; it's just that I was more curious about the folding (as this would destroy the benchmark I took the method from). –  maaartinus Apr 17 at 3:56

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