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Let's say I have a single form, named mainFrm, and an object called objectA, which holds running threads. When any of these 2 happen, my program should close:

(1). User clicks "X" button in mainFrm (so mainFrm.FormClosing is raised)

(2). An event (let's name it "connectionClosed") is raised in objectA

So, no matter what if (1) or (2) are triggered, this chain of events should always include:

  1. the termination of any objectA underlying thread. (I already know how to gracefully terminate them with code located inside objectA)
  2. Of course, mainFrm's closing

What's the best way to solve this problem?

THIS IS HOW I SOLVED IT

Not sure why this question wasn't well received by the community. I thought it was reasonably clear and straightforward. Here's how I solved it, I hope this also helps in better defining what I meant. Should you have any other inquiry just let me know =)

In the form class:

...
this.FormClosed += objectA.kill;
objectA.connectionClosed +=closeForm;
...

private void closeForm(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate { this.Close(); }));
    }
    catch { }
}

In objectA's class:

...
//connectionClosed is raised in different parts of objectA's   threads code
connectionClosed += killClient; 
...

public void killClient(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e)
{
    //event should go past this point just once
    if (!_connectionClosed)
    {
        _connectionClosed = true;

        try
        {
            ... //close connection killing all threads
        }
        catch { }
    }
}

According to (1) and (2) usecases stated at the beginning, this is what should be happening (if I'm not mistaken)

(1). User clicks "X" button -> form closes -> formclosed is raised -> objectA.kill method delegate is executed -> internal threads raises some connectionClosed events which will trigger more objectA.kill executions but this won't do any damage thanks to volatile bool _connectionClosed (of course since there's a try/catch that would work anyway but it just makes more sense to me not to execute such code again) -> threads are terminated by the only full execution of objectA.kill -> SUCCESS

(2). Server closes connection or network error -> objectA's internal threads detect a connection error and raise several connectionClosed events -> different threads will try to execute objectA.kill method delegate. -> meanwhile, in the main form, closeForm is executed, closing the form -> this also triggers another objectA.kill execution (thanks to this.FormClosed += _client.killClient; ) -> again, this poses no harm, since _connectionClosed volatile bool will let only one thread actually execute the code (the first which raised the event) -> threads are gracefully terminated by the only full execution of objectA.kill -> SUCCESS

Next step should be to find a more convenient way so that connectionClosed may be rose only once, I'll google for it right now =)

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Chris Sinclair, Mayur Birari, Sergio, keyser, Soner Gönül Sep 7 '13 at 9:22

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Tip: In connectionClosed, call mainFrm.Close(). Then it simplifies to the first situation. –  Kendall Frey Sep 6 '13 at 22:28

2 Answers 2

Whats the problem with calling Close() on the event? If you switch a boolean on the FormClose, so the next events you can ignore. Only use the FormClosing, if you want to interrupt a user action before closing the form. With the FormClosing you can prevent closing the forum. This is mostly used, if some data isn't saved and you questioning the user if he wants to close the form without saving, else you cancel the closing.

So do not use the FormClosing, Use the FormClosed to cleanup instances.

share|improve this answer
    
this helped in figuring out the solution, thanks. –  Carlo Arnaboldi Sep 8 '13 at 13:59

I'm not sure this can help you clear your problem but you should be consult the below code. This is a example that change back color of a form by using a thread object. The Form1 auto closed when the event _objectA.DoSomething raised 20 times (if(count > 20): you can consider this action like your event connectionClosed raised); or you can close the Form1 anytime while thread running by click on "X" button of Form1.

public delegate void ObjectADoSomethingEventHandler(object sender, ObjectADoSomethingEventArgs e);
public class ObjectADoSomethingEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public int Value { get; private set; }
    public ObjectADoSomethingEventArgs(int value)
    {
        Value = value;
    }
}


public class ObjectA
{
    public event ObjectADoSomethingEventHandler DoSomething;
    protected void OnDoSomething(int value)
    {
        if (DoSomething != null)
            DoSomething(this, new ObjectADoSomethingEventArgs(value));
    }

    public event EventHandler Closed;
    protected void OnClosed()
    {
        if (Closed != null)
            Closed(this, new EventArgs());
    }


    private BackgroundWorker _worker;
    public ObjectA()
    {
        _worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        _worker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(_objectA_DoWork);
        _worker.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(_objectA_ProgressChanged);
        _worker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(_objectA_RunWorkerCompleted);
        _worker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
        _worker.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        _worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    public void Kill()
    {
        if (_worker != null && _worker.IsBusy)
        {
            _worker.CancelAsync();
        }
    }

    private void _objectA_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        int count = 0;
        while (true)
        {
            _worker.ReportProgress(count);
            count++;
            if (count > 20)
            {
                return; // exit thread.
            }

            if (_worker.CancellationPending)
            {
                e.Cancel = true;
                return; // Thread cancelled.
            }
            Thread.Sleep(500);
        }
    }

    private void _objectA_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        OnDoSomething(e.ProgressPercentage);
    }

    private void _objectA_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        OnClosed();
    }
}


public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private ObjectA _objectA;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        _objectA = new ObjectA();
        _objectA.DoSomething += _objectA_DoSomething;
        _objectA.Closed += _objectA_Closed;
        _objectA.Start();
    }

    private void Form1_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
    {
        _objectA.Kill();
    }

    private int _red = 128;
    private int _green = 128;
    private int _blue = 128;
    void _objectA_DoSomething(object sender, ObjectADoSomethingEventArgs e)
    {
        _red += 15;
        if (_red > 255) _red = 128;
        _green -= 15;
        if (_green < 0) _green = 128;
        _blue += 15;
        if (_blue > 255) _blue = 128;
        this.BackColor = Color.FromArgb(_red, _green, _blue);
        this.Text = string.Format("Count = {0}", e.Value);
    }

    void _objectA_Closed(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your time but at the moment I'm not using BackgroundWorker but directly Threads. Anyway this is interesting, I've read through it carefully, maybe I'll consider switching to BackgroundWorker if more problems arise while directly managing threads. –  Carlo Arnaboldi Sep 8 '13 at 14:02
    
BackgroundWorker is a thread also. Therefore, you can easily replace BackgroundWorker by a directly Thread. I use BackgroundWorker as an example to more concise code than directly create and manage a Thread object. Beside, when use BackgroundWorker, you can directly call methods and properties of objects that related to a form (do not through an Invoker method). –  Huy Nguyen Sep 11 '13 at 0:26

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