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I'm trying to open a wav file, read it, convert the buffer to an integer array, then convert it back and write it.

int main(){

    ifstream file ("C:\\Documents\\ParadigmE3-shortened.wav",std::ios_base::out | std::ios_base::binary);

    char * header = new char[50000044];
    file.read(header, 50000044);

    cout << header[0] << endl;

    unsigned int * header_int = new unsigned int[50000044];

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(header); i++){
        header_int[i] = header[i];
    }



    char * writefile = new char[50000044];

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(header); i++){
        itoa(header_int[i], &writefile[i], 10);
    }


    cout << writefile[0] << endl;
    ofstream newfile ("C:\\Documents\\ParadigmE3-modified.wav", std::ios_base::out | std::ios_base::binary);



    newfile.write(writefile, 50000044);

}

Currently, this prints:

R
8

Indicating that it changed the data in the process of converting it. How would I get this to work properly?


After some suggestions, and learning I can perform calculations on char variables, I reformulated the code, and now it is:

int main(){

    // Create file variable with file
    ifstream file ("C:\\Documents\\ParadigmE3-shortened.wav",std::ios_base::out | std::ios_base::binary);

    // Read the first 15040512 bytes to char array pointer, called header
    char * header = new char[15040512];
    file.read(header, 15040512);

    // Copy contents of header to writefile, after the 44'th byte, multiply the value by 2
    char * writefile = new char[15040512];
    for(int i = 0; i < sizeof(header); i++){
        if(i<44) writefile[i] = header[i];
        if(i>=44) writefile[i] = 2 * header[i];
    }

    // Copy the contents of writefile, but at the 44th byte, divide it by 2, returning it to its original value
    for(int i = 0; i < sizeof(header); i++){
        if(i<44) writefile[i] = writefile[i];
        if(i>=44) writefile[i] = .5 * writefile[i];
    }

    // Create file to write to
    ofstream newfile ("C:\\Documents\\ParadigmE3-modified.wav", std::ios_base::out | std::ios_base::binary);

    // Write writefile to file
    newfile.write(writefile, 15040512);

}

However, upon playing (in Windows Media Player), it does not play, so it is clearly not the original file, as I was going for.

share|improve this question
4  
There are so many things wrong with this I don't even know where to start. What are you actually trying to achieve? –  Jonathan Potter Sep 7 '13 at 0:37
1  
50000044 can not be divided in blocks of 8 without a remainder. –  Alexandru Barbarosie Sep 7 '13 at 0:39
1  
No, it reads a char array buffer. And you do not have to convert it to an int array to perform calculations on it, you can perfectly well do numeric operations on char values. In a way a char is just a small int. –  Hot Licks Sep 7 '13 at 1:02
1  
Yes. Like I said, a char is just a small int. (You do need to beware of the fact that char may be "signed" or "unsigned" -- ie, it may represent the values -128 to 127, or it may represent 0 to 255, depending on the specific compiler you use.) –  Hot Licks Sep 7 '13 at 1:24
1  
(And for some operations you need to "cast" the numeric result to char to assign it back to a char: char result = (char) some + mathematical * expression;. This is because the char is "widened" to int to perform most mathematical operations.) –  Hot Licks Sep 7 '13 at 1:26

1 Answer 1

I figured it out. A couple things I learned were that you can perform calculations on 8-bit char variables (with a max value of 255 unsigned), so I didn't need to change it to an int array, however, I did because it gave me more headroom to work with (without worrying about clipping the values at 255).

I have included the entire program (with the header include list), as I also think this is a common question, and this by far is the simplest way I've seen to do it (the other ways I couldn't figure out -- they were much more complicated than this to do the same thing).

It reads the wav file, then it performs an operation on the data portion (beginning at the 45'th byte), then it does the reverse, and writes the file, which is a copy of the original.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <bitset>
#include <string.h>

using namespace std;

int main(){


    ifstream file ("C:\\Documents\\ParadigmE3-shortened.wav",std::ios_base::out | std::ios_base::binary);

    char * header = new char[15040512];
    file.read(header, 15040512);


    int * writefile = new int[15040512];
    for(int i = 0; i < 15040512; i++){
        if(i<44) writefile[i] = header[i];
        if(i>=44) writefile[i] = 2 * header[i];
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < 15040512; i++){
        if(i<44) header[i] = writefile[i];
        if(i>=44) header[i] = .5 * writefile[i];
    }

    ofstream newfile ("C:\\Documents\\ParadigmE3-modified.wav", std::ios_base::out | std::ios_base::binary);


    newfile.write(header, 15040512);

}
share|improve this answer
    
What are you trying to do with this? Make it louder? It doesn't really work that way. –  Retired Ninja Sep 7 '13 at 1:47
    
It worked fine for me (in the example I reverse it, so it's the original, but just halving it lowers the volume). –  JVE999 Sep 7 '13 at 1:49
1  
Uhm... Still so many things wrong! Basics: mixing C and C++ header files together, leaking memory, etc. Subtle bugs waiting to happen: multiplying by 0.5 is not the inverse operation of multiplying by two when you are dealing with integers. I could go on. This is just bad. –  Nik Bougalis Sep 7 '13 at 1:54
    
@NikBougalis Sounds terrible. I'm guessing 0.5 is a float, so it has to cast the float as an integer, but it doesn't always? –  JVE999 Sep 7 '13 at 1:56
1  
It also pays no attention to the number of bits per sample or the fact that 8 bit data is unsigned but 16 bit is signed. –  Retired Ninja Sep 7 '13 at 1:57

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