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I have a big (300 kB) text file containing words delimited by spaces. Now I want to open this file and process every word in it one by one.

The problem is that perl reads the file line by line (i.e) the entire file at once which gives me strange results. I know the normal way is to do something like

open($inFile, 'tagged.txt') or die $!;
$_ = <$inFile>;
@splitted = split(' ',$_);
print $#splitted;

But this gives me a faulty word count (too large array?).

Is it possible to read the text file word by word instead?

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4  
What do you mean a "faulty" word count? Also, if you want the number of elements in @splitted, use scalar @splitted. Finally, the code you have is only reading one line of the file. –  Andy Lester Sep 7 '13 at 2:21
    
@AndyLester. When I said that the words were delimited by spaces I meant by spaces and only by spaces. So the code above reads the entire file in one swoop. Sorry if that was unclear. When I ran wc on the file I get a word count of 41404, when I ran the code above I got a word count of 1948 and when I tried RobEarl:s solution I got 41404 again. –  Johan Wikström Sep 8 '13 at 0:54
    
I imagine there are newlines in the file that you're unaware of; there is no other reason why your code shouldn't work fine as it is. What does wc say for the number of lines in the file (the first number in the output)? –  Borodin Sep 8 '13 at 14:42
    
@Borodin yes you're right. It turned out that the third part tool I used took an input file with 40000 words and no newlines and produced an input file with 40000 words and 4 newlines, the first one starting at word 1948. I didn't see that coming, but it's still nice to know that Perl allows you to read a file word by word if you want to. –  Johan Wikström Sep 9 '13 at 0:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To read the file one word at a time, change the input record separator ($/) to a space:

local $/ = ' ';

Example:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

use feature 'say';

{
    local $/ = ' ';

    while (<DATA>) {
        say;
    }
}

__DATA__
one two three four five

Output:

one 
two 
three 
four 
five
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There is no need to do this for a 300KB file, and it doesn't consider the possibility of multiple spaces between words. –  Borodin Sep 8 '13 at 14:29

Instead of reading it in one fell swoop, try the line-by-line approach which is easier on your machine's memory usage too (although 300 KB isn't too large for modern computers).

use strict;
use warnings;

my @words;
open (my $inFile, '<', 'tagged.txt') or die $!;

while (<$inFile>) {
  chomp;
  @words = split(' ');
  foreach my $word (@words) { # process }
}

close ($inFile);
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It's unclear what you input file looks like, but you imply that it contains just a single line composed of many "words".

300KB is far from a "big text file". You should read it in its entirety and pull the words from there one by one. This program demonstrates

use strict;
use warnings;

my $data = do {
  open my $fh, '<', 'data.txt' or die $!;
  local $/;
  <$fh>;
};

my $count = 0;
while ($data =~ /(\S+)/g ) {
  my $word = $1;
  ++$count;
  printf "%2d: %s\n", $count, $word;
}

output

 1: alpha
 2: beta
 3: gamma
 4: delta
 5: epsilon

Without more explanation of what a "faulty word count" might be it is very hard to help, but it is certain that the problem isn't because of the size of your array: if there was a problem there then Perl would raise an exception and die.

But if you are comparing the result with the statistics from a word processor, then it is probably because the definition of "word" is different. For instance, the word processor may consider a hyphenated word to be two words.

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300K doesn't seem to be big, so you may try:

my $text=`cat t.txt` or die $!;
my @words = split /\s+/, $text;
foreach my $word (@words) { # process }

or slightly modified solution of squiguy

use strict;
use warnings;

my @words;
open (my $inFile, '<', 'tagged.txt') or die $!;

while (<$inFile>) {
  push(@words,split /\s+/);
}
close ($inFile);
foreach my $word (@words) { # process }
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