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Given a cancellation token, I'd like to create an awaitable task out of it, which is never complete but can be cancelled. I need it for a pattern like this, which IMO should be quite common:

async Task DoStuff(Task t, CancellationToken ct)
{
   // t was made from TaskCompletionSource, 
   // both t and ct are beyond my control

   Task t2 = TaskFromCancellationToken(ct);
   await Task.WhenAny(t, t2);

   // do stuff
}

The best idea I've got so far is this:

Task TaskFromCancelationToken(CancellationToken ct)
{
    return Task.Delay(Timeout.Infinite, ct);
}

Is there a better way to make this logic happen?

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1 Answer 1

It's not extremely common, but it's common enough to be part of my AsyncEx library. I use something like this:

public static Task AsTask(this CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource();
    cancellationToken.Register(() => tcs.TrySetCanceled(),
        useSynchronizationContext: false);
    return tcs.Task;
}
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But cancellationToken.Register returns CancellationTokenRegistration, which you never dispose of (it implements IDisposable). Isn't that a problem? –  Paya Apr 8 at 20:31
    
@Paya: Yes. The current version of AsyncEx introduces a ToCancellationTokenTaskSource method which is recommended instead of AsTask. The next version removes AsTask completely. –  Stephen Cleary Apr 8 at 20:47
    
Is there any reason to prefer that over the suggested Task.Delay? That one seems like a very elegant solution and does not come with the IDisposable "annoyance". –  Paya Apr 8 at 21:13
    
@Paya: You still have the same resource leak; it's just not as noticeable. –  Stephen Cleary Apr 8 at 21:28
    
Right. I guess there is no escaping IDisposable then. For the OP, maybe UntilCompletionOrCancellation wrapper might be suitable alternative, if there is no need to keep the cancellation token task around. –  Paya Apr 8 at 22:05

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