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Anyone know a quick easy way to migrate a SQLite3 database to MySQL?

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17 Answers 17

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Here is a list of converters:


An alternative method that would work nicely but is rarely mentioned is: use a ORM class that abstracts the specific database differences away for you. e.g. you get these in PHP (RedBean), Python (Django's ORM layer, Storm, SqlAlchemy), Ruby on Rails ( ActiveRecord), Cocoa (CoreData)

i.e. you could do this:

  1. Load data from source database using the ORM class.
  2. Store data in memory or serialize to disk.
  3. Store data into destination database using the ORM class.
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I recently had to migrate from MySQL to JavaDB for a project that our team is working on. I found a Java library written by Apache called DdlUtils that made this pretty easy. It provides an API that lets you do the following:

  1. Discover a database's schema and export it as an XML file.
  2. Modify a DB based upon this schema.
  3. Import records from one DB to another, assuming they have the same schema.

The tools that we ended up with weren't completely automated, but they worked pretty well. Even if your application is not in Java, it shouldn't be too difficult to whip up a few small tools to do a one-time migration. I think I was able to pull of our migration with less than 150 lines of code.

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Probably the quick easiest way is using the sqlite .dump command, in this case create a dump of the sample database.

sqlite3 sample.db .dump > dump.sql

You can then (in theory) import this into the mysql database, in this case the test database on the database server 127.0.0.1, using user root.

mysql -p -u root -h 127.0.0.1 test < dump.sql

I say in theory as there are a few differences between grammars.

In sqlite transactions begin

BEGIN TRANSACTION;
...
COMMIT;

MySQL uses just

BEGIN;
...
COMMIT;

There are other similar problems (varchars and double quotes spring back to mind) but nothing find and replace couldn't fix.

Perhaps you should ask why you are migrating, if performance/ database size is the issue perhaps look at reoginising the schema, if the system is moving to a more powerful product this might be the ideal time to plan for the future of your data.

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4  
have you actually tried your solution? –  Omry Yadan Jun 5 '12 at 9:00
    
but the most difficult task is the difference betweek grammars –  francois Jul 27 '12 at 23:30

Everyone seems to starts off with a few greps and perl expressions and you sorta kinda get something that works for your particular dataset but you have no idea if it's imported the data correctly or not. I'm seriously surprised nobody's built a solid library that can convert between the two.

Here a list of ALL the differences in SQL syntax that I know about between the two file formats: The lines starting with:

  • BEGIN TRANSACTION
  • COMMIT
  • sqlite_sequence
  • CREATE UNIQUE INDEX

are not used in MySQL

  • SQLlite uses CREATE TABLE/INSERT INTO "table_name" and MySQL uses CREATE TABLE/INSERT INTO table_name
  • MySQL doesn't use quotes inside the schema definition
  • MySQL uses single quotes for strings inside the INSERT INTO clauses
  • SQLlite and MySQL have different ways of escaping strings inside INSERT INTO clauses
  • SQLlite uses 't' and 'f' for booleans, MySQL uses 1 and 0 (a simple regex for this can fail when you have a string like: 'I do, you don\'t' inside your INSERT INTO)
  • SQLLite uses AUTOINCREMENT, MySQL uses AUTO_INCREMENT

Here is a very basic hacked up perl script which works for my dataset and checks for many more of these conditions that other perl scripts I found on the web. Nu guarentees that it will work for your data but feel free to modify and post back here.

#! /usr/bin/perl

while ($line = <>){
    if (($line !~  /BEGIN TRANSACTION/) && ($line !~ /COMMIT/) && ($line !~ /sqlite_sequence/) && ($line !~ /CREATE UNIQUE INDEX/)){

    	if ($line =~ /CREATE TABLE \"([a-z_]*)\"(.*)/){
    		$name = $1;
    		$sub = $2;
    		$sub =~ s/\"//g;
    		$line = "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS $name;\nCREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS $name$sub\n";
    	}
    	elsif ($line =~ /INSERT INTO \"([a-z_]*)\"(.*)/){
    		$line = "INSERT INTO $1$2\n";
    		$line =~ s/\"/\\\"/g;
    		$line =~ s/\"/\'/g;
    	}else{
    		$line =~ s/\'\'/\\\'/g;
    	}
    	$line =~ s/([^\\'])\'t\'(.)/$1THIS_IS_TRUE$2/g;
    	$line =~ s/THIS_IS_TRUE/1/g;
    	$line =~ s/([^\\'])\'f\'(.)/$1THIS_IS_FALSE$2/g;
    	$line =~ s/THIS_IS_FALSE/0/g;
    	$line =~ s/AUTOINCREMENT/AUTO_INCREMENT/g;
    	print $line;
    }
}
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2  
Alex martelli did a great job rewriting this as python over at stackoverflow.com/questions/1067060/perl-to-python –  Jiaaro Jul 1 '09 at 3:38
    
I added the complete python script (the perl script alone didn't quite work for me... needed some extra processing to handle Foreign Keys, and Indexes) –  Jiaaro Jul 1 '09 at 5:11
2  
MySQL in ANSI mode accepts identifiers in double quotes. –  porneL Jan 10 '10 at 23:18
2  
COMMIT and CREATE UNIQUE INDEX are valid MySQL commands, please fix it. –  niutech Jun 6 '13 at 9:49
1  
I understand your script is "quick and dirty", but also very useful, so here's a few additions/bugfixes: * after && ($line !~ /CREATE UNIQUE INDEX/) add && ($line !~ /PRAGMA foreign_keys=OFF/) * the table-name-matching regex misses digits, that is instead of $line =~ /INSERT INTO \"([a-z_]*)\"(.*)/ there must be $line =~ /INSERT INTO \"([a-z_1-9]*)\"(.*)/ Hope this helps the future readers –  user680353 Jan 30 at 22:01

It's messy because dump files are database vendor specific.

If you're using Rails, a great plugin exists for this. Read: http://blog.heroku.com/archives/2007/11/23/yamldb_for_databaseindependent_data_dumps/

Update

Currently maintained fork: https://github.com/ludicast/yaml_db

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1  
Worked great for me - thanks! –  Rich Apodaca Mar 3 '09 at 6:06
    
This looks exactly like what I need for my problem(migrating from SQLite to MySql for a rails project). Thanks! –  tstyle May 14 '11 at 13:26
1  
If you are in a Rails project this is your solution –  fguillen Feb 26 '13 at 13:58
    
This gem is pure gold. –  user984621 Jul 27 at 11:15

Here is a python script, built off of Shalmanese's answer and some help from Alex martelli over at Translating Perl to Python

I'm making it community wiki, so please feel free to edit, and refactor as long as it doesn't break the functionality (thankfully we can just roll back) - It's pretty ugly but works

use like so (assuming the script is called dump_for_mysql.py:

sqlite3 sample.db .dump | python dump_for_mysql.py > dump.sql

Which you can then import into mysql

note - you need to add foreign key constrains manually since sqlite doesn't actually support them

here is the script:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import re
import fileinput

def this_line_is_useless(line):
    useless_es = [
        'BEGIN TRANSACTION',
        'COMMIT',
        'sqlite_sequence',
        'CREATE UNIQUE INDEX',        
    ]
    for useless in useless_es:
        if re.search(useless, line):
            return True

def has_primary_key(line):
    return bool(re.search(r'PRIMARY KEY', line))

searching_for_end = False
for line in fileinput.input():
    if this_line_is_useless(line):
        continue

    # this line was necessary because ''); was getting
    # converted (inappropriately) to \');
    if re.match(r".*, ''\);", line):
        line = re.sub(r"''\);", r'``);', line)

    if re.match(r'^CREATE TABLE.*', line):
        searching_for_end = True

    m = re.search('CREATE TABLE "?([a-z_]*)"?(.*)', line)
    if m:
        name, sub = m.groups()
        line = "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS %(name)s;\nCREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `%(name)s`%(sub)s\n"
        line = line % dict(name=name, sub=sub)
    else:
        m = re.search('INSERT INTO "([a-z_]*)"(.*)', line)
        if m:
            line = 'INSERT INTO %s%s\n' % m.groups()
            line = line.replace('"', r'\"')
            line = line.replace('"', "'")
    line = re.sub(r"([^'])'t'(.)", "\1THIS_IS_TRUE\2", line)
    line = line.replace('THIS_IS_TRUE', '1')
    line = re.sub(r"([^'])'f'(.)", "\1THIS_IS_FALSE\2", line)
    line = line.replace('THIS_IS_FALSE', '0')

    # Add auto_increment if it's not there since sqlite auto_increments ALL
    # primary keys
    if searching_for_end:
        if re.search(r"integer(?:\s+\w+)*\s*PRIMARY KEY(?:\s+\w+)*\s*,", line):
            line = line.replace("PRIMARY KEY", "PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT")
        # replace " and ' with ` because mysql doesn't like quotes in CREATE commands
        if line.find('DEFAULT') == -1:
            line = line.replace('"', '`').replace("'", '`')
        else:
            parts = line.split('DEFAULT')
            parts[0].replace('"', '`').replace("'", '`')
            line = 'DEFAULT'.join(parts)

    # And now we convert it back (see above)
    if re.match(r".*, ``\);", line):
        line = re.sub(r'``\);', r"'');", line)

    if searching_for_end and re.match(r'.*\);', line):
        searching_for_end = False

    if re.match(r"CREATE INDEX", line):
        line = re.sub('"', '`', line)

    print line,
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2  
Hi Jim, on my dataset every first INSERT statement is wrapped by a backquote instead of a single quote : __ DROP TABLE IF EXISTS schema_migrations; CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS schema_migrations (version varchar(255) NOT NULL); INSERT INTO schema_migrations VALUES(20100714032840); INSERT INTO schema_migrations VALUES('20100714033251'); __ –  David Aug 5 '10 at 2:26
    
well... it does not show up above, but the backquotes appears inside the VALUES ([HERE]20100714032840[/HERE]) –  David Aug 5 '10 at 2:28
    
The AUTOINCREMENT in Mysql is AUTO_INCREMENT. The script does not account for that. –  giuseppe Sep 27 '13 at 8:01

I use data loader for migrating almost any data, it helps me to convert MSSQL to MYSQL, MS access to MSSQL, mysql, csv loader, foxpro and MSSQL to MS access, MYSQl, CSV, foxpro etc. In my view this is a best Data Migration Tool

Download Free : http://www.dbload.com

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This script is ok except for this case that of course, I've met :

INSERT INTO "requestcomparison_stopword" VALUES(149,'f');
INSERT INTO "requestcomparison_stopword" VALUES(420,'t');

The script should give this output :

INSERT INTO requestcomparison_stopword VALUES(149,'f');
INSERT INTO requestcomparison_stopword VALUES(420,'t');

But gives instead that output :

INSERT INTO requestcomparison_stopword VALUES(1490;
INSERT INTO requestcomparison_stopword VALUES(4201;

with some strange non-ascii characters around the last 0 and 1.

This didn't show up anymore when I commented the following lines of the code (43-46) but others problems appeared:


    line = re.sub(r"([^'])'t'(.)", "\1THIS_IS_TRUE\2", line)
    line = line.replace('THIS_IS_TRUE', '1')
    line = re.sub(r"([^'])'f'(.)", "\1THIS_IS_FALSE\2", line)
    line = line.replace('THIS_IS_FALSE', '0')

This is just a special case, when we want to add a value being 'f' or 't' but I'm not really comfortable with regular expressions, I just wanted to spot this case to be corrected by someone.

Anyway thanks a lot for that handy script !!!

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Ha... I wish I had found this first! My response was to this post... http://stackoverflow.com/questions/489277/script-to-convert-mysql-dump-sql-file-into-format-that-can-be-imported-into-sqlit

Combining the two would be exactly what I needed:


When the sqlite3 database is going to be used with ruby you may want to change:

tinyint([0-9]*) 

to:

sed 's/ tinyint(1*) / boolean/g ' |
sed 's/ tinyint([0|2-9]*) / integer /g' |

alas, this only half works because even though you are inserting 1's and 0's into a field marked boolean, sqlite3 stores them as 1's and 0's so you have to go through and do something like:

Table.find(:all, :conditions => {:column => 1 }).each { |t| t.column = true }.each(&:save)
Table.find(:all, :conditions => {:column => 0 }).each { |t| t.column = false}.each(&:save)

but it was helpful to have the sql file to look at to find all the booleans.

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fallino correctly identified the location of the error in the script. I have the solution. The problem is the following lines:

line = re.sub(r"([^'])'t'(.)", "\1THIS_IS_TRUE\2", line)
line = line.replace('THIS_IS_TRUE', '1')
line = re.sub(r"([^'])'f'(.)", "\1THIS_IS_FALSE\2", line)
line = line.replace('THIS_IS_FALSE', '0')

The replacement pattern (2nd parameter) in the re.sub calls is a "regular" string, so instead of \1 expanding to the first regexp match, it expands to a literal 0x01. Likewise, \2 expands to 0x02. For example, a line containing: ,'t','f', would be replaced with: <0x01>10<0x02>
(First substitution changes ,'t', to <0x1>1<0x2> Second substitution changes <0x02>'f', to <0x1>0<0x1>)

The fix is to either change the replacement strings by adding an 'r' prefix, or by escaping the \1 and \2 in the existing string. Since easy manipulation of regexp strings is what raw strings are for, here's the fix using those:

line = re.sub(r"([^'])'t'(.)", r"\1THIS_IS_TRUE\2", line)
line = line.replace('THIS_IS_TRUE', '1')
line = re.sub(r"([^'])'f'(.)", r"\1THIS_IS_FALSE\2", line)
line = line.replace('THIS_IS_FALSE', '0')
share|improve this answer
    
I had problems with this fix when there were multiple booleans in a line. See my combined, revised, Python script elsewhere in this thread for the answer. –  Snips Nov 13 '12 at 17:08

Surprised no one's mentioned this by now, but there's actually a tool explicitly for this. It's in perl, SQL:Translator: http://sqlfairy.sourceforge.net/

Converts between most any form of tabular data (Different SQL formats, Excel spreadsheet), and even makes diagrams of your SQL schema.

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"Presently only the definition parts of SQL are handled (CREATE, ALTER), not the manipulation of data (INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE)." –  Quantum7 Apr 10 '13 at 21:58

The python script worked after a few modifications as follows:

# Remove "PRAGMA foreign_keys=OFF; from beginning of script
# Double quotes were not removed from INSERT INTO "BaselineInfo" table, check if removed from subsequent tables.  Regex needed A-Z added.
# Removed backticks from CREATE TABLE
# Added replace AUTOINCREMENT with AUTO_INCREMENT
# Removed replacement,
#line = line.replace('"', '`').replace("'", '`')

...

useless_es = [
    'BEGIN TRANSACTION',
    'COMMIT',
    'sqlite_sequence',
    'CREATE UNIQUE INDEX',
    'PRAGMA foreign_keys=OFF',
    ]

...

m = re.search('CREATE TABLE "?([A-Za-z_]*)"?(.*)', line)
if m:
    name, sub = m.groups()
    line = "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS %(name)s;\nCREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS %(name)s%(sub)s\n"
    line = line % dict(name=name, sub=sub)
line = line.replace('AUTOINCREMENT','AUTO_INCREMENT')
line = line.replace('UNIQUE','')
line = line.replace('"','')
else:
    m = re.search('INSERT INTO "([A-Za-z_]*)"(.*)', line)
    if m:
                    line = 'INSERT INTO %s%s\n' % m.groups()
                    line = line.replace('"', r'\"')
                    line = line.replace('"', "'")

...

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1  
For those that don't know Python, lines 6-8 above should be tabbed to match lines 3-5 –  Ian Dundas Mar 21 '12 at 12:28

Based on Jims's solution: Quick easy way to migrate SQLite3 to MySQL?

sqlite3 your_sql3_database.db .dump | python ./dump.py > your_dump_name.sql
cat your_dump_name.sql | sed '1d' | mysql --user=your_mysql_user --default-character-set=utf8 your_mysql_db -p  

This works for me. I use sed just to throw the first line, which is not mysql-like, but you might as well modify dump.py script to throw this line away.

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1  
I had some UTF-8 encoding issues with the imported data, but adding --default-character-set=utf8 to the import command seems to have fixed that. Taken from this Q/A: stackoverflow.com/questions/346092/… –  Snips Nov 13 '12 at 0:09
    
Ok, I've added this - is it ok? –  alekwisnia Nov 13 '12 at 11:55
    
That's where I'm using the extra switch, yes. –  Snips Nov 13 '12 at 12:01
aptitude install sqlfairy libdbd-sqlite3-perl

sqlt -f DBI --dsn dbi:SQLite:../.open-tran/ten-sq.db -t MySQL --add-drop-table > mysql-ten-sq.sql
sqlt -f DBI --dsn dbi:SQLite:../.open-tran/ten-sq.db -t Dumper --use-same-auth > sqlite2mysql-dumper.pl
chmod +x sqlite2mysql-dumper.pl
./sqlite2mysql-dumper.pl --help
./sqlite2mysql-dumper.pl --add-truncate --mysql-loadfile > mysql-dump.sql
sed -e 's/LOAD DATA INFILE/LOAD DATA LOCAL INFILE/' -i mysql-dump.sql

echo 'drop database `ten-sq`' | mysql -p -u root
echo 'create database `ten-sq` charset utf8' | mysql -p -u root
mysql -p -u root -D ten-sq < mysql-ten-sq.sql
mysql -p -u root -D ten-sq < mysql-dump.sql
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echo ".dump" | sqlite3 /tmp/db.sqlite > db.sql

watch out for CREATE statements

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I've just gone through this process, and there's a lot of very good help and information in this Q/A, but I found I had to pull together various elements (plus some from other Q/As) to get a working solution in order to successfully migrate.

However, even after combining the existing answers, I found that the Python script did not fully work for me as it did not work where there were multiple boolean occurrences in an INSERT. See here why that was the case.

So, I thought I'd post up my merged answer here. Credit goes to those that have contributed elsewhere, of course. But I wanted to give something back, and save others time that follow.

I'll post the script below. But firstly, here's the instructions for a conversion...

I ran the script on OS X 10.7.5 Lion. Python worked out of the box.

To generate the MySQL input file from your existing SQLite3 database, run the script on your own files as follows,

Snips$ sqlite3 original_database.sqlite3 .dump | python ~/scripts/dump_for_mysql.py > dumped_data.sql

I then copied the resulting dumped_sql.sql file over to a Linux box running Ubuntu 10.04.4 LTS where my MySQL database was to reside.

Another issue I had when importing the MySQL file was that some unicode UTF-8 characters (specifically single quotes) were not being imported correctly, so I had to add a switch to the command to specify UTF-8.

The resulting command to input the data into a spanking new empty MySQL database is as follows:

Snips$ mysql -p -u root -h 127.0.0.1 test_import --default-character-set=utf8 < dumped_data.sql

Let it cook, and that should be it! Don't forget to scrutinise your data, before and after.

So, as the OP requested, it's quick and easy, when you know how! :-)

As an aside, one thing I wasn't sure about before I looked into this migration, was whether created_at and updated_at field values would be preserved - the good news for me is that they are, so I could migrate my existing production data.

Good luck!

UPDATE

Since making this switch, I've noticed a problem that I hadn't noticed before. In my Rails application, my text fields are defined as 'string', and this carries through to the database schema. The process outlined here results in these being defined as VARCHAR(255) in the MySQL database. This places a 255 character limit on these field sizes - and anything beyond this was silently truncated during the import. To support text length greater than 255, the MySQL schema would need to use 'TEXT' rather than VARCHAR(255), I believe. The process defined here does not include this conversion.


Here's the merged and revised Python script that worked for my data:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import re
import fileinput

def this_line_is_useless(line):
    useless_es = [
        'BEGIN TRANSACTION',
        'COMMIT',
        'sqlite_sequence',
        'CREATE UNIQUE INDEX',        
    'PRAGMA foreign_keys=OFF'
        ]
    for useless in useless_es:
        if re.search(useless, line):
                return True

def has_primary_key(line):
    return bool(re.search(r'PRIMARY KEY', line))

searching_for_end = False
for line in fileinput.input():
    if this_line_is_useless(line): continue

    # this line was necessary because ''); was getting
    # converted (inappropriately) to \');
    if re.match(r".*, ''\);", line):
        line = re.sub(r"''\);", r'``);', line)

    if re.match(r'^CREATE TABLE.*', line):
        searching_for_end = True

    m = re.search('CREATE TABLE "?([A-Za-z_]*)"?(.*)', line)
    if m:
        name, sub = m.groups()
        line = "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS %(name)s;\nCREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `%(name)s`%(sub)s\n"
        line = line % dict(name=name, sub=sub)
    line = line.replace('AUTOINCREMENT','AUTO_INCREMENT')
    line = line.replace('UNIQUE','')
    line = line.replace('"','')
    else:
        m = re.search('INSERT INTO "([A-Za-z_]*)"(.*)', line)
        if m:
                line = 'INSERT INTO %s%s\n' % m.groups()
                line = line.replace('"', r'\"')
                line = line.replace('"', "'")
    line = re.sub(r"(?<!')'t'(?=.)", r"1", line)
    line = re.sub(r"(?<!')'f'(?=.)", r"0", line)

    # Add auto_increment if it's not there since sqlite auto_increments ALL
    # primary keys
    if searching_for_end:
        if re.search(r"integer(?:\s+\w+)*\s*PRIMARY KEY(?:\s+\w+)*\s*,", line):
            line = line.replace("PRIMARY KEY", "PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT")
        # replace " and ' with ` because mysql doesn't like quotes in CREATE commands

    # And now we convert it back (see above)
    if re.match(r".*, ``\);", line):
        line = re.sub(r'``\);', r"'');", line)

    if searching_for_end and re.match(r'.*\);', line):
        searching_for_end = False

    if re.match(r"CREATE INDEX", line):
        line = re.sub('"', '`', line)

    print line,
share|improve this answer

Get a SQL dump

moose@pc08$ sqlite3 mySqliteDatabase.db .dump > myTemporarySQLFile.sql

Import dump to MySQL

For small imports:

moose@pc08$ mysql -u <username> -p
Enter password:
....
mysql> use somedb;
Database changed
mysql> source myTemporarySQLFile.sql;

or

mysql -u root -p somedb < myTemporarySQLFile.sql

This will prompt you for a password. Please note: If you want to enter your password directly, you have to do it WITHOUT space, directly after -p:

mysql -u root -pYOURPASS somedb < myTemporarySQLFile.sql

For larger dumps:

mysqlimport or other import tools like BigDump.

BigDump gives you a progress bar:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work because of slight syntax differences and flags in sqlite vs mysql. You still need to manually convert it. –  dlite922 Feb 25 at 18:59

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