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I plan to create an interface (rather a virtual base class in c++) with a method that takes an argument of the own type.

class Base {
public:
    virtual void seriousMethod(const Base &arg) = 0;
}

The derived class should however take not an argument of the base class type but of the derived class type.

class Derived: public Base {
public:
    virtual void seriousMethod(const Derived &arg) { /* ... */ }
}

How would I realize this? Would I have to template the base class (e.g. Base<Derived>) or is there a cleaner solution?

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More to the point - what is the motivation to do this? –  Ed Heal Sep 7 '13 at 8:01
    
"The derived class should however take not an argument of the base class type but of the derived class type" -- what's the point in having virtual methods at all then ? –  berak Sep 7 '13 at 8:05
    
@EdHeal To be specific, an A-Star search generic node class that is to be specified by the derived implementations. –  Appleshell Sep 7 '13 at 8:19
    
@AdamS - What is a A-Star search? –  Ed Heal Sep 7 '13 at 8:24
    
@EdHeal A pathfinding algorithm: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A*_search_algorithm –  Appleshell Sep 7 '13 at 8:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't do this directly. Think about this case:

Base b;
Derived d;
Base& d_ref = d;
d_ref.seriousMethod(b);  // What happens here?

At compile-time, the variable d_ref has static type Base, so according to the definition of Base, it should be able to take b as a parameter to seriousMethod.

But at runtime, the dynamic type of d_ref is Derived, so it according to the definition of Derived, it can't take b as a parameter to seriousMethod. It can't convert b to Dervied since it might be a straight Base object (if Base is not abstract), or it might be some other class derived from Base that is not the same as Derived.

You are correct in assuming that the only real way to go about this is the curiously-recurring template pattern, i.e. templating Base and defining Dervied as:

class Derived : public Base<Derived> { ... }

This removes the problem illustrated above, because each type derived from Base<T> will have a distinct base class, and will not be related to one another through inheritance.

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