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Is it possible, when instantiating an object, to pass-in a class which the object should derive from?

For instance:

class Red(object):
    def x(self):
        print '#F00'

class Blue(object):
    def x(self):
        print '#00F'

class Circle(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        # here, we set Bar's parent to `parent`
        self.x()

class Square(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        # here, we set Bar's parent to `parent`
        self.x()
        self.sides = 4

red_circle = Circle(parent=Red)
blue_circle = Circle(parent=Blue)
blue_square = Square(parent=Blue)

Which would have similar effects as:

class Circle(Red):
    def __init__(self):
        self.x()

without, however, affecting other instances of Circle.

share|improve this question
3  
Are you sure this is the way you want to organize this? It seems Circle and Square should have an attribute 'color'. At least in terms of common English, Red and Blue are not parents of Circles and Squares. – unutbu Dec 8 '09 at 15:01
2  
I think you are abusing "OO Design" in a fundamental way. – S.Lott Dec 8 '09 at 16:20
    
@S.Lott - I think I was trying to be overly clever. Dependency Injection will be more than sufficient for my task. – unpluggd Dec 9 '09 at 15:04
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I agree with @AntsAasma. You should probably consider using dependency injection. Atleast in the example given (which I'm sure is greatly simplified to illustrate your problem), the color of a shape is better represented by via a has-a relationship rather than with a is-a relationship.

You could implement this via passing in the desired color object to the constructor, storing a reference to it, and delegating the function call to this object. This greatly simplifies the implementation while still retaining the desired behavior. See an example here:

class Red(object):
    def x(self):
        print '#F00'

class Blue(object):
    def x(self):
        print '#00F'

class Shape(object):
    def __init__(self,color):
        self._color=color
    def x(self):
        return self._color.x()

class Circle(Shape):
    def __init__(self, color):
        Shape.__init__(self,color)
        self.x()

class Square(Shape):
    def __init__(self, color):
        Shape.__init__(self,color)
        self.x()
        self.sides = 4

red_circle = Circle(color=Red())
blue_circle = Circle(color=Blue())
blue_square = Square(color=Blue())

Edit: Fixed names of constructor arguments in sample code

share|improve this answer
    
+1: mixins a/k/a "Dependency Injection" – S.Lott Dec 8 '09 at 16:21
    
+1. In the def init for Square, perhaps parent should be changed to color. – unutbu Dec 8 '09 at 16:26
    
@~unutbu: fixed the init argument names, good catch. – Mark Roddy Dec 8 '09 at 16:54
    
Yes; I wanted to inherit, and potentially override, method from a number of parent objects, however DI is probably the best bet. – unpluggd Dec 9 '09 at 15:03

Perhaps what you are looking for is a class factory:

#!/usr/bin/env python
class Foo(object):
    def x(self):
        print('y')

def Bar(parent=Foo):
    class Adoptee(parent):
        def __init__(self):
            self.x()
    return Adoptee()
obj=Bar(parent=Foo)
share|improve this answer

It sounds like you are trying to use inheritance for something that it isn't meant for. If you would explain why you want to do this, maybe a more idiomatic and robust way to achieve your goals can be found.

share|improve this answer
    
Updated my question per your suggestion. – unpluggd Dec 8 '09 at 14:49
2  
Can you elaborate a bit? I assume your goal isn't to make shapes that print their color. Do other classes need to see the methods provided by the dynamically given "parent class"? Does the "parent class" need to access attributes/methods of the child object? Given the current information, I'd suggest you store an instance of the color as an attribute and delegate any work through that attribute. – Ants Aasma Dec 8 '09 at 15:12

If you really need it, then you could use type constructor, e.g. within a factory function (or inside __new__ method, but this is probably safer approach):

class Foo(object):
    def x(self):
        print 'y'

class Bar(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.x()

def magic(cls, parent, *args, **kwargs):
    new = type(cls.__name__, (parent,), cls.__dict__.copy())
    return new(*args, **kwargs)

obj = magic(Bar, parent = Foo)
share|improve this answer

As everybody else says, that's a pretty weird usage, but, if you really want it, it's surely feasible (except for the mysterious Bar that you pull out of thin air in comments;-). For example:

class Circle(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.__class__ = type('Circle', (self.__class__, parent), {})
        self.x()

This gives each instance of Circle its own personal class (all named Circle, but all different) -- this part is actually the key reason this idiom is sometimes very useful (when you want a "per-instance customized special method" with new-style classes: since the special method always gets looked up on the class, to customize it per-instance you need each instance to have a distinct class!-). If you'd rather do as much class-sharing as feasible you may want a little memoizing factory function to help:

_memo = {}
def classFor(*bases):
  if bases in _memo: return _memo[bases]
  name = '_'.join(c.__name__ for c in bases)
  c = _memo[bases] = type(name, bases, {})
  return c

(here I'm also using a different approach to the resulting class's name, using class names such as Circle_Red and Circle_Blue for your examples rather than just Circle). Then:

class Circle(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.__class__ = classFor(Circle, parent)
        self.x()

So the technique is smooth and robust, but I still don't see it as a good match to the use case you exemplify with. However, it might be useful in other use cases, so I'm showing it.

share|improve this answer
    
Alex, I'm getting TypeError: __class__ must be set to new-style class, not 'NoneType' object when trying out your second definition of Circle -- the one using classFor. I'm not sure what's wrong. Would you please take a look? – unutbu Dec 8 '09 at 18:23
1  
Oops, the classFor function just needs to return c – unutbu Dec 8 '09 at 18:32
    
Right -- sorry for the typo, and good spotting @unutbu, tx. – Alex Martelli Dec 8 '09 at 23:00

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