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public class GeoHelper
{ 
    const string GeoIpUrl = "http://freegeoip.net/json/{0}";
    private readonly string _ipAddress = string.Empty;

    public GeoHelper(string ip)
    {
        _ipAddress = ip;
    }

    public async Task<string> GetGeoAsync()
    {
        string uri = string.Format(GeoIpUrl, _ipAddress);

        var httpClient = new HttpClient();

        var response = await httpClient.GetAsync(uri);

        response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();

        var content = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();

        return content;
    }

}

Then I am calling it as follows:

    [ChildActionOnly]
    public ActionResult UserGeo()
    {
        var ip = RequestHelper.GetClientIpAddress(Request);

        var geoHelper = new GeoHelper(ip);

        var response = geoHelper.GetGeoAsync();

        var result = response.Result;

        var resultobj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<GeoInfo>(result);

        return Content(resultobj.city);
    }

at var result = response.Result; it waits and never ends, i get a grey hair while waiting. I have a small console app it works fine there. same code.

Why? how can i fix?

share|improve this question
1  
Whenever you use task.Result or task.Wait() on a task has not yet completed, you risk deadlocks, and need to take steps to prevent them. You're blocking the thread until the task completes, but the rest of GetGeoAsync cannot run until that same thread is available. –  hvd Sep 7 '13 at 11:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, asynchronous child actions are not currently supported in MVC. Please vote on this issue (CodePlex, UserVoice).

I explain the deadlock issue on my blog. Essentially, it's because ASP.NET only allows one thread at a time in the request context, and when you block a thread in the request context (using Result), then any async methods that are attempting to re-enter that context cannot complete.

There are various hacks you can use, but the cleanest solution is to just use synchronous code if you can. Another solution is to use Result, but in that case you have to make sure every await in GetGeoAsync (and every async method it calls) uses ConfigureAwait(false), which means you can't use the HttpContext, request, or response.

A third solution, which is rather hacky, is to use AsyncContext.Run from my AsyncEx library:

[ChildActionOnly]
public ActionResult UserGeo()
{
  return AsyncContext.Run(async () =>
  {
    var ip = RequestHelper.GetClientIpAddress(Request);
    var geoHelper = new GeoHelper(ip);
    var response = geoHelper.GetGeoAsync();
    var result = await response;
    var resultobj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<GeoInfo>(result);
    return Content(resultobj.city);
  }
}

However, the AsyncContext approach does not work for all code. It sets up a kind of "nested loop" but does not use AspNetSynchronizationContext, so some ASP.NET code does not like running within AsyncContext.

share|improve this answer
    
So basically, because the response object is not guaranteed to produce correct results if you have both a writer ( the asp worker process channeling data from IIS ) and a reader ( the user code, the ASpx page ) accessing it simultaneously. As such, concurrent access is refused. –  Andyz Smith Sep 7 '13 at 12:55
    
@AndyzSmith: That's not quite what I mean. When you use ConfigureAwait(false) on ASP.NET, you're allowing any thread pool thread to continue the async method. So if you use request/response objects, you'll be accessing them from multiple threads (and they are not threadsafe). –  Stephen Cleary Sep 7 '13 at 13:15
    
Ok. So by using ConfigureAwait (false) the concurrent access is denied by isolating the response object to be available only in the first await. –  Andyz Smith Sep 7 '13 at 13:20
    
@AndyzSmith: I don't know what you mean by "denied." If you have a question on how this works, please post a question. –  Stephen Cleary Sep 7 '13 at 14:45
    
Stephen. Asp.net is single threaded and any attempt to achieve multi threaded asynchronous behavior is going to be obstructed. By the environment denying a second ( asynchronous ) thread access to the response object, ( deadlock ) or, or by limiting the scope of the Response context to the first await. –  Andyz Smith Sep 8 '13 at 2:25

Try this...

[ChildActionOnly]
public async Task<ActionResult> UserGeo()
{
    var ip = RequestHelper.GetClientIpAddress(Request);
    var geoHelper = new GeoHelper(ip);
    var result = await geoHelper.GetGeoAsync();
    var resultobj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<GeoInfo>(result);
    return Content(resultobj.city);
}
share|improve this answer
    
cant do that... –  DarthVader Sep 7 '13 at 11:10
1  
@DarthVader Why not? This answer won't compile (missing async, wrong return type), but can you not use async here at all? –  hvd Sep 7 '13 at 11:11
1  
Ah yes, I failed to check the return type of the calling method. However "can't do that" isn't a particularly helpful response... –  ZombieSheep Sep 7 '13 at 11:12
    
ok well that has another problem. I cant call that from a Html.RenderAction . –  DarthVader Sep 7 '13 at 11:41

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