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We have a class schedule. In @appointments_monday, we have different appointment that belongs to a specific category:

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Certainly, @appointment.each would not work. It will produce something like:

enter image description here

because some appointment of a certain category could be empty. We're trying to loop through @categories to judge each appointment, but it turns out like this:

enter image description here

    <% @appointments.each do |appointment| %>
        <% @categories.each do |category| %>
            <% if appointment.category == category %>
              <%= appointment %>  
            <% else %>
                placeholder
            <% end %>    
       <% end %>
    <% end %>

I think the problem is that @categories.each is looped over every time. How should we deal with this?

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Can you show us the desired output? Is it the first diagram? –  Daiku Sep 7 '13 at 12:52
    
@Daiku yes, the first. –  cqcn1991 Sep 7 '13 at 12:56
1  
Then I think you just need to switch your inner and outer iterators. But Carol's answer is probably more efficient, as the test to see if the category matches is in C, not ruby. –  Daiku Sep 7 '13 at 17:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about, instead of looping over both appointments and categories, you iterate over just categories once (since you want to output something for each category, whether it has an appointment or not) and check for the existence of any appointments with that category:

<% @categories.each do |category| %>
  <% category_appointments = @appointments.select {|a| a.category == category } %>
  <% if category_appointments.empty? %>
    <%= placeholder %>
  <% else %>
    <%= category_appointments %>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

select is a method on Enumerable which is included in Array.

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It works, really. But I still find this method quite counter intuitive. Is it possible to do with the @appointments? I feeled that is how a table should be filled. –  cqcn1991 Sep 7 '13 at 15:20
    
Oh, I wonder if I'm misunderstanding the problem. You're filling in the cells of the table, and the row is for the set of all appointment objects in @appointments, and the columns are for each category, correct? I was thinking of it more like "Let's visit each cell in the row and see if anything belongs here" rather than "Let's place all the appointments in the cells where they belong". Does that help? I'm not really sure why you would want to iterate over @appointments, could you elaborate if it sounds like I'm misunderstanding? –  carols10cents Sep 7 '13 at 22:50
1  
Ah! I get your point. Now it makes more sense to me. –  cqcn1991 Sep 8 '13 at 3:19

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