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The challenge:

The German geek podcast Fanboys asked their audience in their latest episode 135 to check which of the episode numbers for upcoming shows will be a 2-level Harshad Number.

A Harshad Number in a given number base, is an integer that is divisible by the sum of its digits when written in that base.

A 2-level Harshad Number, according to the Fanboys interpretation, shall be a number which divisible by the sum of its digits, and the resulting ratio itself shall be a Harshad Number.

Solution (ugly, to be refined):

I tried to solve this task in R with following code adding a function "two.step.harshed.number(start, end)" with following code:

# Function to calculate the two-leveled Harshed Numbers for given integer number intervall

two.step.harshed.number = function(start, end) 
{ 
  # Function to calculate a digit sum
  digitsum = function (x) {sum(as.numeric(unlist(strsplit(as.character(x), split="")))) }

  # Function returning a numbers value if integer, otherwise NA
  checkinteger = function (x) {
    if (x%%1==0) {
      return (x)
    }
    else {
      return(NA)
    }
  }

  # Setup data frame with rows of numbers from start value to end value
  db = data.frame(number=start:end)  

  # 1st level run
  # Calculate the digit sum of those numbers
  db$digitsum1 = sapply(db$number, FUN=digitsum)
  # Calculate the ratio of number and it's digit sum and keep only if it's an integer 
  db$ratio1 = db$number / db$digitsum1
  db$ratio1 = sapply(db$ratio1, FUN=checkinteger) 
  db = na.omit(db)

  # 2st level run
  # Calculate the digit sum of the previous (integer) ratio 
  db$digitsum2 = sapply(db$ratio1, FUN=digitsum) 
  # Calculate the ratio of the previous ratio and it's digit sum and keep only if it's an integer
  db$ratio2 = db$ratio1 / db$digitsum2
  db$ratio2 = sapply(db$ratio2, FUN=checkinteger) 
  db = na.omit(db)

  # Return remaining number, which proved to be two-leveled Harshed Numbers
  return(db$number)
}

The solution for the challenge (next episodes up to number 200) when using the function:

two.step.harshed.number(136, 200)

is a series of three numbers, which appear correct to me:

162 180 200

Question:

I am aware this is a beginners code. I'd like to create another function which generalizes the task to n-steps. I.e. function "n.step.harshed.number(steps, start, end)". Any ideas to accomplish this and make the code more efficient?

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Have you read all the papers linked on the wiki page? –  Carl Witthoft Sep 7 '13 at 15:08
    
@CarlWitthoft Yes, I did read and tried to understand those papers. As far as I understand them, they do not really cover the approach I have chosen and are more focussed on the numbers theory. My question is more related to seek for experienced R coders suggestions to make the code more efficient and generalize it. –  user2030503 Sep 7 '13 at 15:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the meantime I made some progress in simplifying and generalizing the Harshad function:

# Function to calculate the n-leveled Harshad Numbers for given integer number intervall
multi.step.harshed.number = function(numlevels, start, end) 
{ 
  digitsum = function(x) sum(floor(x / 10^(0:(nchar(x) - 1))) %% 10)
  checkinteger = function (x) {
    ifelse (x == as.integer(x), return (x), return(NA))
  }
  db = data.frame(start:end)  
  for (i in 1:numlevels) {
    db[, (2*i)] = sapply(db[, (2*i)-1], FUN=digitsum) 
    db[, (2*i)+1] = db[, (2*i)-1] / db[, (2*i)]
    db[, (2*i)+1] = sapply(db[, (2*i)+1], FUN=checkinteger) 
    db = na.omit(db)
    if (nrow(db) == 0) break
  }  
  return(db[,1])
}

EDIT: 2nd version - maybe following code is a bit more elegant and less busy:

multi.step.harshed.number = function(numlevels, start, end) {
  is.integer= function(x) ifelse (x== as.integer(x), return (x), return(NA))
  digitsum = function(x) sum(floor(x/10^(0:(nchar(x)-1))) %% 10)
  digitsumratio= function(x) ifelse(is.integer(x/digitsum(x)), x/digitsum(x), NA) 
  multi.digitsumratio= function(iter, x) {
    for (i in 1:iter) x= digitsumratio(x)
    return (ifelse(is.na(x), FALSE, TRUE))     
  }
  sequence=start:end
  idx=sapply(sequence, FUN=function (x) multi.digitsumratio(numlevels, x))
  sequence[idx]
}

EDIT: 3rd version - same as 2nd but just faster due to use of parallel package:

multi.step.harshed.number = function(numlevels, start, end) {
  library(parallel)
  processors= detectCores()
  cl= makeCluster(processors)
  is.integer= function(x) ifelse (x== as.integer(x), return (x), return(NA))
  digitsum = function(x) sum(floor(x/10^(0:(nchar(x)-1))) %% 10)
  digitsumratio= function(x) ifelse(is.integer(x/digitsum(x)), x/digitsum(x), NA) 
  multi.digitsumratio= function(iter, x) {
    for (i in 1:iter) x= digitsumratio(x)
    return (ifelse(is.na(x), FALSE, TRUE))     
  }
  sequence=start:end
  idx=parSapply(cl=cl,X=sequence, FUN=function (x) multi.digitsumratio(numlevels, x))
  sequence[idx]
}

Trying: multi.step.harshed.number(42, 100, 10000) returns:

 [1]   100   108   120   162   180   200   210   216   240   243   270   300   324   360   378   400   405   420   432   450
[21]   480   486   500   540   600   630   648   700   720   756   800   810   840   864   900   972  1000  1080  1200  1296
[41]  1458  1620  1800  1944  2000  2100  2160  2400  2430  2700  2916  3000  3240  3402  3600  3780  4000  4050  4200  4320
[61]  4374  4500  4800  4860  5000  5400  5832  6000  6300  6480  6804  7000  7200  7290  7560  8000  8100  8400  8640  8748
[81]  9000  9720 10000
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