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I'm trying to create a chat program using UDP. I've created a parent and a child process in both the client and the server to separately receive and send messages. Problem is the server can't send. Help please. Here's my code.

CLIENT

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <string.h>
    #include <sys/types.h>
    #include <sys/socket.h>
    #include <netinet/in.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <fcntl.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    #include <signal.h>
    #include <sys/stat.h>
    #include <arpa/inet.h>

    int main(int argc, char **argv)
    {
        int sockfd;
        struct sockaddr_in servaddr;
        socklen_t len = sizeof(servaddr);
        char mesg[1024], rmesg[1024];
        pid_t pid;

        if(argc!=2){ 
            printf("Usage: %s <ip_addr>\n",argv[0]);
            exit(1);
        }

        sockfd = socket(PF_INET,SOCK_DGRAM,0);
        bzero(&servaddr, sizeof(servaddr));
        servaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
        servaddr.sin_port = htons(54321);
        inet_pton(AF_INET,argv[1],&servaddr.sin_addr);

        pid = fork();
        if(pid == 0) {
            printf("Type 'exit' to Exit. \n");
            while(1){
                fgets(mesg,sizeof(mesg),stdin);
                sendto(sockfd,mesg,strlen(mesg),0,(const struct sockaddr *)&servaddr,len);
                if(strcmp(mesg, "exit\n") == 0)
                    break;
            }
            close(sockfd);
            kill(pid, SIGINT);
            exit(0);
        }else{
            while(1){
                memset(rmesg,0,sizeof(rmesg));
                if(recv(sockfd,rmesg,sizeof(rmesg),0) > 0 ){
                    printf("From Server: %s", rmesg);
                }
            }
        }
        close(sockfd);
        return 0;
    }

SERVER

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <string.h>
    #include <sys/types.h>
    #include <sys/socket.h>
    #include <netinet/in.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <fcntl.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    #include <signal.h>
    #include <sys/stat.h>
    #include <arpa/inet.h>

    int main(int argc, char **argv)
    {
        int sockfd1;
        struct sockaddr_in servaddr,cliaddr;
        socklen_t len = sizeof(cliaddr);
        char cli_ip[32];
        char mesg[1024], smesg[1024];
            pid_t  pid1;

        sockfd1 = socket(PF_INET,SOCK_DGRAM,0);
        bzero(&servaddr, sizeof(servaddr));
        servaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
        servaddr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
        servaddr.sin_port = htons(54321);
        inet_ntop(AF_INET,(struct in_addr *) &cliaddr.sin_addr, cli_ip, sizeof(cli_ip) );

        if ( bind( sockfd1, (struct sockaddr*) &servaddr, sizeof(servaddr) ) < 0 ){
            perror(NULL);
            exit(-1);
        }

        pid1 = fork();
        if(pid1 == 0){
            while(1){
                memset(mesg,0,sizeof(mesg));
                if( recvfrom(sockfd1,mesg,sizeof(mesg),0,(struct sockaddr *)&cliaddr,&len) > 0 ){
                    printf("From client: %s",mesg);
                }
            }
        }else{
            printf("Type 'exit' to Exit. \n");
            while(1){
                fgets(smesg,sizeof(smesg),stdin);
                sendto(sockfd1,smesg,strlen(smesg),0,(struct sockaddr *)&cliaddr,len);
                if(strcmp(smesg, "exit\n") == 0)
                    break;
            }
            close(sockfd1);
            kill(pid1, SIGINT);
            exit(0);
        }
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this question
    
This code fully lacks any error checking on reads and writes and most other system calls! This is bad and unwise in the first place, as detecting errors is the only possibility to react to them. And at least it helps a lot during development, testing and debugging! –  alk Sep 7 '13 at 15:37
    
Why is the server calling inet_ntop on an uninitialized cliaddr.sin_addr? It's also calling recvfrom() in a child process, but the parent process is trying to use that cliaddr in its sendto -- the structure isn't updated in the parent process. –  Barmar Sep 7 '13 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

The problem is most likely in the client:

while(1){
    if(recv(sockfd,rmesg,sizeof(rmesg),0) > 0 ){
        printf("From Server: %s", rmesg);
    }
}

You are calling recv on an unconnected socket. You're likely getting an error (probably ENOTCONN) which you are ignoring. And I believe you're also seeing high CPU usage on the clients, since it is continuously looping, failing each system call.

The solution is to use recvfrom instead. Alternatively you can call connect on the socket, even if it is SOCK_DGRAM, but this is not normally done.

share|improve this answer
1  
if you don't call connect(), you have to call bind() to set the local port to listen on. –  Barmar Sep 7 '13 at 15:28
    
@Barmar, you do not need a socket to be connected for UDP. As long as it is bound to the port on which the sender is sending data, the receiver hsould be able to receive it. Of course, a UDP socket can also call connect(), as you mentioned. –  Manoj Pandey Sep 7 '13 at 15:29
    
@ManojPandey Isn't that what I said? You seem to be commenting on the answer, not my comment. –  Barmar Sep 7 '13 at 15:30
    
Agreed (+1). Thnx. My comment was for @cnicutar. –  Manoj Pandey Sep 7 '13 at 15:33
    
@ManojPandey I never said you need to connect it for UDP. You need to connect it if you want to use straight recv. –  cnicutar Sep 7 '13 at 15:41

WHy are you using hte same socket for both server and client? This does not make sense. A simpler alternative would be to use two threads. One thread handling the server socket and the other thread handling the client thread. And ofcourse, you would need to have two sockets as well -- one for the server and one for the client. Also, the sendto() needs to have the address and port information of the receiver.

share|improve this answer
    
@user2757209 If you are running code separately for client and server, why are you doing a fork() for both client/server? You shoudl use threads to handle this -- they are more efficient. Creating a process with each client is very inefficient. –  Manoj Pandey Sep 7 '13 at 15:48
    
I don't know how to use threads yet, so i settled for fork(). Efficiency doesn't really matter, and this is just a two way communication program.. –  user2757209 Sep 7 '13 at 15:57
    
For the current option, you can still use the main process to get your tasks done since sendto() is a non-blocking call. If you need to scale at some point, then I would strongly recommend spending some time on Pthreads. Creating a process is way more expensive than creating threads. It will be worth the time spent, especially when you are trying to scale. –  Manoj Pandey Sep 7 '13 at 16:01
    
Ok i'll try to learn threads. Thanks. –  user2757209 Sep 7 '13 at 16:07

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