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I have been searching for this in web and java tutorials.But i have no clarification about how to generate a digital signature for a document. This is explained in java tutorial, but what i exactly want is

  1. user comes with a file and a secret key which is a String.
  2. using that secret key, file is digitally signed.
  3. the corresponding public key, and the sign is published with that document.

So, how to convert the given String private key to do this. While trying the examples given in java tutorials, and web (with some variation of putting bytes from string instead of files) i got exceptions like

Caught: java.security.spec.InvalidKeySpecException: Inappropriate key specification: IOException : Detect premature EOF
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What kind of String is on your mind? A custom one chosen so that a human can remember it easily? Or just a String to transport the data? The latter can be done by e.g. bas64 encoding an actual private key. –  mkl Sep 8 '13 at 5:46
    
Human friendly string –  user2463026 Sep 8 '13 at 7:58
    
In that case I'm afraid you're out of luck. At least if you want an interoperable solution. –  mkl Sep 8 '13 at 8:08

1 Answer 1

You can't find a sample because the string is not a private key of the appropriate key pair (yet I can imagine that some asymmetric keys can look like a text string).

Keypairs are generated. If you control both signer and verifier, it's theoretically possible to generate a keypair using the string as a seed for randomizer, thus getting repeatable randomization results on both signer and verifier side, but security of this approach is questionable.

I must admit that your idea to sign using text strings is appealing, but unfortunately not generally possible.

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