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I have bunch of files in the following format:

15
17
18
21
14
18
14
13
17
11
11
18
15
15
12
17
9
10
12
17
14
17
etc

The following scripts reads those files:

import os
from collections import Counter


def main():
    p = './newR'
    fd = os.listdir(p)
    countUniq(p, fd)


def writeFile(fd, fhp, fcount):
    fo = './nnewR/'+fd+'.txt'
    with open(fo, 'a') as f:    
        r = '%s %s\n' % (fhp, fcount)
        f.write(r)


def countUniq(path, dirs):
    for pfiles in dirs:
        pathN = os.path.join(path, pfiles)
        with open(pathN, 'r') as infile:
            data = infile.read()
        fileN = os.path.basename(pathN)
        stripFN = os.path.splitext(fileN)[0]
        fDate = stripFN.split('_')[0]
        countr = Counter()
        countr.update([int(d) for d in data.split()])
        for line, count in countr.items():
            writeFile(fDate, line, count)
main()

This outputs the following files:

20130813.txt
20130819.txt
20130825.txt
20130831.txt
etc

Lets have a look at the first file to test if it does the job:

51 4
9 4
10 36
11 48
12 132
13 144
14 148
15 133
16 52
17 105
18 61
19 20
20 12
21 16
22 20
23 8

This is strange, why does it not start with the smallest number like 9 but instead it does with 51!!

Another file if I randomly check:

28 4
9 20
10 122
11 136
12 298
13 302
14 397
15 314
16 218
17 264
18 148
19 93
20 32
21 49
22 16
23 13
24 8
25 4
60 4

Again it doesn't start with the smallest number, this is wrong output. I'm suspecting it has to do with the loop when reading the file or something which I'm not sure about as I have been stuck on this point for a while.

I could really use some input here.

When I use

.most_common()

instead of

.items()

for line, count in countr.most_common():
print fDate, line, count

I get everything mixed up not even close to sorted like with .items():

20130822 14 379
20130822 15 336
20130822 12 306
20130822 13 292
20130822 17 266
20130822 16 200
20130822 18 172
20130822 11 132
20130831 14 364
20130831 15 353
20130831 12 302
20130831 13 300
20130831 17 281
20130831 16 244
20130831 18 153
20130831 11 133
20130831 10 121
20130831 19 73
20130831 21 32
20130820 14 387
20130820 15 338
20130820 12 308
20130820 13 300
20130820 17 282
20130820 16 193
20130820 18 169
20130820 11 136
20130820 10 116
20130820 19 85
20130820 21 44

Which is not even close to be sorted

share|improve this question
    
Is Counter a dict? dicts aren't stored in any given order. –  Paul Tomblin Sep 7 '13 at 16:05
    
Yes, it is dict but this is why I use countr.update(loop the data in here). Is there a better option? –  samewar Sep 7 '13 at 16:16
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Counter iterates over its elements in arbitrary order, though its repr displays the elements in descending order of count.

If you want them to be ordered, use .most_common() to sort by the occurrences, or sorted() to sort by the key:

>>> c = collections.Counter({6: 2892, 67: 1921, 3: 1821, 35: 304})
>>> for i, count in c.iteritems(): print i,count
... 
35 304
67 1921
3 1821
6 2892
>>> for i, count in c.most_common(): print i,count
... 
6 2892
67 1921
3 1821
35 304
>>> for i, count in sorted(c.items()): print i,count
... 
3 1821
6 2892
35 304
67 1921
share|improve this answer
    
When I replace countr.items() with countr.most_common() the results are not even ordered. I tried countr.iteritems() which produces exactly the same results. –  samewar Sep 7 '13 at 16:13
    
Sorry, I didn't realize you were trying to sort by the key. Updated answer. –  nneonneo Sep 7 '13 at 16:16
    
Thank you very much, this did the job perfectly. I was missing using sorted() In my loop. Thank you very much for your input, appreciate it. –  samewar Sep 7 '13 at 16:28
    
so flag the answer as solved –  Xavier Combelle Sep 7 '13 at 17:16
    
Sorry for that, I just did –  samewar Sep 7 '13 at 17:29
show 2 more comments

Not sure what platform, but if shell is an option:

sort myfile.txt | uniq -c | sort -nr
share|improve this answer
    
I'm using ubuntu, I want ideally with python scripts but this would have been an option to consider. But now I'm getting my desired results thanks to @nneonneo –  samewar Sep 7 '13 at 16:30
    
You should accept the @nneonneo answer, not mine... –  beroe Sep 7 '13 at 19:53
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