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What I currently have:

@Entity
public class Payment {

    @Id @GeneratedValue
    private long id;

    @Column(unique = true)
    private Date period; // Only used for year and month

    ...
}

@Entity
public class Department {

    @Id @GeneratedValue
    private long id;

    ...
}

The Payment entity just holds default payments that need to be paid by all departments only once pear year and month. There is no relationship needed for between them as all Departments pay all Payments.

What I want to achieve:

I want to distinguish between the currently shared payments and some other Department specific payments. So a Department will be able to choose to use all the shared payments (as it is currently designed) or define its own payments and not use any of the other ones.

The company Payments should keep working in the same way and I have to make sure that the Department payments are unique for each department too.

In OOP terms, I think I need to model any of the following options:

enter image description here

Probably the first one would be more appropriate.

Note I can't change the way any entity is currently identified. However, I can add uniqueness on any other fields.

Questions:

  1. What would be the appropriate way to do this in JPA2?
  2. Is a Payment hierarchy the way to go? How should it be mapped to make sure the unique fields don't collide?
  3. Is there any way to avoid the hierarchy?
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To extend the hierarchy option: That would be one table with discriminator (C|D) that will have both CompanyPayments and DepartmentPayments so the uniqueness will be determined by the pair: discriminator column and period column –  Mosty Mostacho Sep 7 '13 at 17:19
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3 Answers

I think the scenario does require a relationship:

@Entity
public class Payment {

    @Id @GeneratedValue
    private long id;

    @Column(unique = true)
    private Date period; // Only used for year and month

    @ManyToOne
    private Department department;
}

This would allow any type of payment to be created for any department. As far as default payments for a department, I think that is outside the responsibility of the ORM and should be handled within the business logic.

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I believe a relationship is indeed a must. But it is not enough. This wont take care of handing unique Department|Period pairs. A payment that has no department is considered a Default payment. As in DB terms you had a Payment table with an FK to Departments that can be nulled. If the FK is null, then the Payment is default. So, setting a compound unique index (not PK!) on the PaymentId and FKDepartmentID would do the trick. I think there must be some kind of way to do that in JPA. –  Mosty Mostacho Sep 7 '13 at 17:11
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If I understood you correctly, you need to achieve uniqueness per department. It's possible using compound id. Some points:

  • if you want to use compound keys(period+department_id) you have to set them both and your default payments should have 1 common fake Department to which all default payments will belong to.
  • In general case I would follow Kevin's approach. It's easy and less error-prone. Anyway you decide.

@Entity
public class Payment implements Serializable {

    @EmbeddedId
    private Period period;
}

@Embeddable
public class Period implements Serializable {
    @ManyToOne
    private Department department;
    private Date period;
}


@Entity
public class Department implements Serializable {
    @Id@GeneratedValue
    private long id;

    @OneToMany
    private List<Payment> payments = new ArrayList<Payment>();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't actually change the ID of the current Payments. As I mentioned in my comment in Kevin's answer, I can't use a compound PK but I could use a unique index. Also, I don't like the idea of the fake department (which happens because you have a compound PK instead of just a compound unique index). Now, as I mentioned in the comment in the question, in order to fix this, a hierarchy could be used with a discriminator for both types of departments, right? Is it possible for me to keep the currently existent simple PK and also maintain uniqueness with the discriminator and department_FK pairs? –  Mosty Mostacho Sep 7 '13 at 23:38
    
I'm awarding the bounty to you as a 2nd best answer, IMO. –  Mosty Mostacho Sep 15 '13 at 21:06
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I haven't been able to keep the PK in my Payment entity and also maintain a unique index on both Period and Department. In DB terms I'm looking for these:

Payment(ID, Period, FK_Department)

And this table should be added a unique index in Period and FK_Department that would allow nulls in FK_Department (as you can see a compound PK is not an option here for that reason and because I need to keep the same PK structure used). With that table, all Payments with null FK_Department value will be the generic/default/company payments while the ones with a non-null FK_Department will be the ones that a particular department has assigned, so it will use those instead of the company ones.

Due to my lack of knowledge of JPA I couldn't manage to replicate this schema. However, I could create a similarly functional schema. This is the best I came up with so far:

enter image description here

With its obviously awful period duplication I can manage to create two unique index for each table: one for the Period of the CompanyPayment entity and one for the Period and Department pair of the DepartmentPayment entity:

@Entity
@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.JOINED)
public abstract class Payment {

    @Id @GeneratedValue
    private long id;

    ...
}

@Entity
public class CompanyPayment extends Payment {

    @Column(unique = true)  
    public Date period;

    ...
}

@Entity
@Table(uniqueConstraints =
    @UniqueConstraint(columnNames = { "period", "department_id" })
)
public class DepartmentPayment extends Payment {

    public Date period;

    @ManyToOne(optional = false)
    @JoinColumn(name = "department_id")
    private Department department;

    ...
}

I will be using this solution for now but I'm open to any other better solution.

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