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I need to write a function in Common-Lisp that takes a list of lists and returns a list containing all the possible combinations of the elements from the sublists.

So, for example calling the function on a list such as ((1 2) (1 2)) should return a list like ((1 1) (1 2) (2 1) (2 2)). The input list can be of any length and the sublists are not guaranted to have the same length.

I know how to get this with paired elements from the sublists ( inputtting ((1 2) (1 2)) returns ((1 1) (2 2)), but that's not good enough for the arc-consistency algorithm I'm trying to write, and I'm stuck.

Thank you.

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1  
what have you done so far? stackoverflow is not really a service to automagically convert informal specs into CL code. You best ask such questions showing your effort so far. – Rainer Joswig Sep 7 '13 at 17:30
1  
Sort-of duplicate of (Scheme) Recursive function to compute all possible combinations of some lists?. Granted that's a Scheme question and not CL, but it's not hard to adapt. – Chris Jester-Young Sep 7 '13 at 17:35
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What you want is basically the cartesian product of the sublists. You should be able to find solutions for your problem by looking for that term. – Rörd Sep 7 '13 at 17:58
    
@Rörd Indeed, that's exactly what I searched for when trying to find a (sort-of) duplicate: I first search for [common-lisp] cartesian (which found nothing), then [lisp] cartesian, and so on. – Chris Jester-Young Sep 7 '13 at 18:23
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Erm... those aren't combinations. Combinations don't allow things like (1 2) and (2 1) in the same result. That's the cartesian / cross-product. Combinations are per definition independent of the order. – user797257 Sep 7 '13 at 19:24
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you don't want to use a library, here's code to do the same thing, and works with any number of lists:

(defun combinations (&rest lists)
  (if (car lists)
      (mapcan (lambda (inner-val)
                (mapcar (lambda (outer-val)
                          (cons outer-val
                                inner-val))
                        (car lists)))
              (apply #'combinations (cdr lists)))
    (list nil)))

[2]> (combinations '(1 2))
((1) (2))
[3]> (combinations '(1 2) '(3 4))
((1 3) (2 3) (1 4) (2 4))
[4]> (combinations '(1 2) '(3 4) '(5 6))
((1 3 5) (2 3 5) (1 4 5) (2 4 5) (1 3 6) (2 3 6) (1 4 6) (2 4 6))
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Thank you very much, that's exactly what I was looking for – A.Fernandez Sep 8 '13 at 18:00
    
Tiny bug: one would expect (combinations '(1 2) '(3 4) '()) and (combinations '(1 2) '() '(3 4)) to be nil, like (combinations '() '(1 2) '(3 4)). However, the three results are different. Thus the function works if no list beyond the first is empty. – user1220978 Sep 9 '13 at 11:58

wvxvw removed their answer that pointed to a function from Alexandria, but it does provide a very similarly named function that actually does what you want. Instead of alexandria:map-combinations, you need alexandria:map-product, e.g.

(apply #'alexandria:map-product #'list '((1 2) (1 2)))

evaluates to

((1 1) (1 2) (2 1) (2 2))
share|improve this answer
    
I realized I got confused about what OP really wanted. Whether there was a mistake in the example, or the naming, so I decided to remove the answer, just so not to keep the confusion going. – user797257 Sep 7 '13 at 21:57

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