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I am trying to modularise logging code from a large codebase because the live logging framework (Apache) makes our code tightly coupled to it and this makes it very hard to write unit tests. I am stuck by the fact I cannot have virtual templated functions. My current approach can be summarised by the following:

// Context.h
struct Logger
{
    template <typename... Args>
    void operator()(const char* aFormat, Args&&... aArgs)
    {
         // This function would ideally be virtual.
         // Is there a funky way to get this function to call
         // a derived class' implementation instead.
         std::cerr << "I don't want to see this printed" << std::endl;
    }
};

class Context
{
public:
    Context(const Logger& aLogger)
    :   iLogger(aLogger)
    {
    }

    template <typename... Args>
    void DEBUG(const char* aFormat, Args&&... aArgs)
    {
        iLogger(aFormat, aArgs...);
    }

private:
    const Logger& iLogger;
};


// MyType.h
#include "Context.h"

class MyType
{
public:
    MyType(Context& aCtx)
    :   iCtx(aCtx)
    {
        DEBUG("> ctor");
        DEBUG("< ctor. this=%p", this);
    }

private:
    template <typename... Args>
    void DEBUG(const char* aFormat, Args&&... aArgs)
    {
        iCtx.DEBUG(aFormat, aArgs...);
    }

    Context& iCtx;
};


// main.cpp
#include "MyType.h"

template <typename... Args>
static void StdErrLog(const char* aFormat, Args&&... aArgs)
{
    fprintf(stderr, aFormat, aArgs...);
}

struct StdErrLogger : public Logger
{

    // This function never gets called because it's not virtual.
    template <typename... Args>
    void operator(const char* aFormat, Args&&... aArgs)
    {
        StdErrLog(aFormat, aArgs...);
    }
}

int main(...)
{
    StdErrLogger logger; // For unit tests this could be 'EmptyLogger' for example.
    Context ctx(logger);

    MyType t(ctx);
}

So close yet so far. Is there anything I can do to make this work without template-ising the Context class? The code base isn't templated at all and I'm very reluctant to go down this route as it'll be a lot of tedious work.

If it can be done by keeping the templates down to function-level scope I'd be very happy to see solutions. Function pointers are acceptable too, but I'm not sure about the feasibility of getting the address of variadic templated functions.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Check CRTP on google – cooky451 Sep 7 '13 at 18:51
2  
Do you need the format string and the arguments in the implementation, or just the result of the formatting? If you need more than just the result of the formatting, is there an intermediate form that would do? How do your implementations of the logger or formatter differ? – Yakk Sep 7 '13 at 18:55
    
The problem is that templates need to be instantiated by the compiler, i.e. the compiler has to create actual functions from the function templates. Therefore, the implementation of function templates needs to be available in each Translation Unit (if they're to be instantiated). Function templates cannot be virtual because using a base class' function would require instantiating the (all) derived class' overriders, and that's not possible with the separate compilation you want/can achieve with virtual functions. – dyp Sep 7 '13 at 19:00
    
@Yakk For testing I intended to use a logger that printed nothing at all (or maybe stderr if I needed it). For production I'd have a call to Apache runtime's ap_log_error. I think I'd need the arguments in the implementation. – James Sep 7 '13 at 19:30
    
@cooky451 CRTP would mean I'd have to template Context at the class scope. That would lead to a lot of other changes elsewhere – James Sep 7 '13 at 19:32

I took a step back and peeled off a few layes of templates. Raw function pointers gave me what I need. I also hope that the compiler will be clever enough to generate no code if I pass nullptr as a function. The disadvantage is that each LogFunction will have to do the va_list/start/end faff.

// Context.h
typedef void (*LogFunction)(const char*, ...);

class Context
{
public:
    Context(LogFunction aDebugFunc)
    :   iDebugFunc(aDebugFunc)
    {
    }

    template <typename... Args>
    void DEBUG(const char* aFormat, Args&&... aArgs)
    {
        if (iDebugFunc)
        {
            iDebugFunc(aFormat, aArgs...);
        }
    }

private:
    LogFunction iDebugFunc;
};


// main.cpp
#include <cstdarg>

void StdErrLogger(const char* aFormat, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, aFormat);

    fprintf(stderr, aFormat, args);

    va_end(args);
}

int main(...)
{
    Context ctx(StdErrLogger);
    MyType t(ctx);
}
share|improve this answer

As others have said already, templates need to be instantiated, in other words the compiler has to know that a template function might be used with a specific set of arguments and so create a corresponding instance of the function.

If you want to "fake" the behaviour of virtual functions for template functions with function A<T> despatching to one of B1<T>, B2<T>, B3<T>... dynamically, then you need to ensure that all of the B functions are instantiated. In order to do this, the implementation of A needs to "know about" all of the different possible Bs. You can then apply something like the Visitor Pattern.

The second option is that you let the compiler know which B is going to be used for a given instantiation of A<T>. In other fords you template Context with a ConcreteLoggerType.

The third option is to not template the Bs at all but to deal with the different Ts dynamically somehow. James describes how to do this using a variable argument list.

In summary your options are:

  1. Use a fixed set of loggers.
  2. Template the Context with the Logger
  3. Use a non-template Logger

Being a big fan of the power of C++ template programming I would lean towards the second solution Policy-Based Design.

share|improve this answer

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