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I'm a pretty new web developer learning html5 and javascript.

I have a webpage with "tabs" that make parts of the webpage disappear and reappear.

The links are like this:

<a href="?tab=1" id="t1" class="tab" onclick="switchf('Home',this)">HOME</a>

and the javascript function switchf() is like this:

function switchf(field,tab) {
    var divs = ["Home","About","Chatroom","Account","Contact","Signup"];
    for(var j = 0; j < divs.length; j++) {
        if(field != divs[j])
            document.getElementById(divs[j]).style.display = "none";
        else
            document.getElementById(divs[j]).style.display = "block";
    }

    var t = document.getElementsByClassName("tab");
    for(var i = 0; i < t.length; i++) {
        t[i].style.backgroundColor = "#dddddd";
    }

    tab.style.backgroundColor = "#cccccc";
    document.getElementsByTagName("title")[0].innerHTML = field;
}

It takes two arguments - the part of the page to appear and the tab that was pressed.

It loops through the parts of the page and changes them all to display="none", then goes to all the tabs and changes them to backgroundColor="#dddddd".

Then it chooses the right tab to change color and the right part of the page to appear.

However, when I am passing this as an argument (onclick="switchf('Home',this)"), it doesn't change color (tab.style.backgroundColor = "#cccccc";).

Is this the right way to pass this as an argument? I figured it would be the easiest way - but I've never used it in js before and it doesn't work in this example.

Like all my other mistakes, it's probably a very simple one, but please point it out to me.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that you're following the href, which refreshes the page. Add return false to the inline handler to prevent this.

<a href="?tab=1" id="t1" class="tab" onclick="switchf('Home',this); return false;">HOME</a>

Or just add return before the function call, and then return false inside the function.

<a href="?tab=1" id="t1" class="tab" onclick="return switchf('Home',this);">HOME</a>

function switchf(field,tab) {
    var divs = ["Home","About","Chatroom","Account","Contact","Signup"];
    for(var j = 0; j < divs.length; j++) {
        if(field != divs[j])
            document.getElementById(divs[j]).style.display = "none";
        else
            document.getElementById(divs[j]).style.display = "block";
    }

    var t = document.getElementsByClassName("tab");
    for(var i = 0; i < t.length; i++) {
        t[i].style.backgroundColor = "#dddddd";
    }

    tab.style.backgroundColor = "#cccccc";
    document.getElementsByTagName("title")[0].innerHTML = field;

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
it still seems to reload the page. –  jlam55555 Sep 7 '13 at 19:45
    
@Jon: If you modified the code correctly, it'll only reload the page if the JavaScript fails sometime before the return false;. Check your browser's developer console for errors. –  user2736012 Sep 7 '13 at 19:48
    
i just figured out there was an error that read "Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'style' of null" in the javascript on this line: document.getElementById(divs[j]).style.display = "none"; what does this mean? –  jlam55555 Sep 7 '13 at 19:52
    
@Jon: This means there's no element on the page with the ID provided by divs[j]. Check the spelling of the IDs in your document and Array. –  user2736012 Sep 7 '13 at 19:52
    
thanks that was the problem! silly me! –  jlam55555 Sep 7 '13 at 19:54

In your situation, this refers to the object that contains the event handler attribute.

this is one of the most useful features of JavaScript, and using it in the manner shown in your question is exactly what it was designed for. The other function that is run by the event handler can thereby receive the object as one of its arguments.

I am looking through your code to see what else may be happening with it.

Update: Your event handler is not stopping the link from submitting, meaning that your page will be reloaded with the query string that you specified.

You have two options now:

  1. return false in your event handler to prevent the link from being followed and the page refreshed. Like this: onclick="switchf('Home',this); return false;"

  2. allow the link to be followed and change your event handler to a query-string parser that changes the active tab based on the current query string. (This solution would be preferred because it would allow visitors to view a specific tab directly from an external link without needing to follow the link to your site and then secondarily click on a certain tab.)

P.S. Here is some code of mine that does virtually the exact same thing and uses the same arguments as the code you posted:

http://jsfiddle.net/cookies/4JPJA/2/

share|improve this answer
    
is it right, then? –  jlam55555 Sep 7 '13 at 19:35
    
the first suggestion doesn't seem to work. can you please elaborate on the second option? –  jlam55555 Sep 7 '13 at 19:45
    
@Jon it looks right except that you are including an href in your link. What probably is happening is that for an instant the menu is updated but then immediately the page is refreshed and you will see the previous menu again. –  Joseph Myers Sep 7 '13 at 19:45
    
Sure, just post your code at jsfiddle.net and click "Save" and then post me the resulting URL in a comment. I can update your code with query string reader with no problem. –  Joseph Myers Sep 7 '13 at 19:46
    
http://jsfiddle.net/63uyZ/ but it has problems –  jlam55555 Sep 7 '13 at 19:52

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