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I'm trying to create an entire site hosted purely on CouchDB (no nginx reverse proxy either) using a lot of client side Jquery/AJAX magic. Now I'm in the process of making it SEO friendly. I'm using vhosts and URL rewrites to route traffic from the root to my index.html file:

vhost:

example.com /dbname/_design/dd/_rewrite/

In my rewrite definition:

rewrites:[
   {
       "from": "/db/*",
       "to": "/../../../*",
       "query": {
       }
   },
   {
       "from": "/",
       "to": "../../static/index.html",
       "query": {
       }
   }
]

When optimizing a site for SEO, Google requires you to do a few things:

  • Use the hashbang (#!) in your friendly URL to tell the web crawler that you are an AJAX site with web crawlable material: http://example.com/index.html#!home
  • Use an http query argument to provide an HTML escaped fragment of that AJAX page: http://example.com/index.html?_escaped_fragment=home

I tried the following with no luck:

rewrites:[
   {
       "from": "/db/*",
       "to": "/../../../*",
       "query": {
       }
   },
   {
       "from": "/",
       "to": "../../static/index.html",
       "query": {
       }
   }, /* FIRST ATTEMPT */
      {
       "from": "/?_escaped_fragment=:_escaped_fragment",
       "to": "/_show/escaped_fragment/:_escaped_fragment",
       "query": {
       }
   }, /* SECOND ATTEMPT */
      {
       "from": "/?_escaped_fragment=*",
       "to": "/_show/escaped_fragment/*",
       "query": {
       }
   }, /* THIRD ATTEMPT */
      {
       "from": "/",
       "to": "/_show/escaped_fragment/:_escaped_fragment",
       "query": {
       }
   }
]

From what I've seen, CouchDB's URL rewriter is not capable of distinguishing the difference between a URLs with args and no args. Has anyone had luck creating such a rule with CouchDB URL rewrites?

share|improve this question
    
Your third attempt is the only correct. Just query /_design/ddoc/_rewrite?_escaped_fragment=foo and it will be rewritten to /_design/ddoc/_show/escaped_fragment/foo. Sure, you need to have escaped_fragment show function defined in this case. –  Kxepal Sep 7 '13 at 21:25
    
@Kxepal The only problem with the 3rd option is that CouchDB treats it the same as my rewrite rule for sending "/" to "../../static/index.html". –  pokstad Sep 8 '13 at 2:14
    
yea, collision. May be merge them? In this case the :_escaped_fragment will be undefined (_rewrite/ -> _show/escaped_fragment/undefined), but you'll note that he is missed in query object, so it should be easy to make another redirect from show function to static/index.html (not nice, but still solution) –  Kxepal Sep 8 '13 at 9:00
    
I've thought about using redirects, but the Google specification says that it must be the exact same URL for the website to be crawl-able: http://example.com/index.html#!home & http://example.com/index.html?_escaped_fragment=home. If I redirect to somewhere different than http://example.com/index.html, I will end up with a new URL (chasing my tail). –  pokstad Sep 8 '13 at 17:13
    
BTW, I may not be able to find a solution to this problem, but I found a potential alternative to the hashbang/escaped_fragment method of SEO: moz.com/blog/… –  pokstad Sep 8 '13 at 17:17

1 Answer 1

I don't have a answer to the question, but I've developed a solution for the bigger problem of making crawlable sites hosted on CouchDB. It is a system that makes use of Facebook's React, list and show functions, ajax on the client and window.history to render the same HTML components filled with data at CouchDB and at the browser:

https://github.com/fiatjaf/reactive-couch

This solution doesn't need the hashbang, because for each unique URL the browser navigates to, using ajax and window.history or simple links (be it _list/listName/viewName/_show/displayKind/c305ee4d-8611-4e08-b9d3-3318835632a9 or something rewritten as /name//kind/c305ee4d-8611-4e08-b9d3-3318835632a9), the server can render the pertinent content.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the solution. I've developed a similar approach using pure client side Javascript. I use it on my personal blog: pokstad.com Basically, I render the page in the browser, and then I capture the entire document, serialize it, and save it as an attachment. This attachment gets returned when users/crawlers browse directly to a link. Otherwise, I use HTML5 history api to load/unload AJAX pages. –  pokstad Mar 23 '14 at 21:48

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