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In the following code, the alert works fine and prints "DIV : IFRAME" as it should however it then says that cNs[1].childNodes[1].document has no properties.

Html:

<div id="WinContainer">
 <div style="display: none;"><iframe id="frame1" name="frame1"></iframe></div>
 <div style="display: none;"><iframe id="frame2" name="frame2"></iframe></div>
</div>

JavaScript:

var cNs = document.getElementById('WinContainer').childNodes;
alert(cNs[1].tagName + ' : ' + cNs[1].childNodes[1].tagName);
cNs[1].childNodes[1].document.location = 'someurl.pl';

BUT if I do this:

frame1.document.location = 'someurl.pl';

it works fine.

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1  
Your code actually doesn't alert "DIV : IFRAME". See jsbin.com/owofo/edit cNs[1].childNodes[1] is null. – Roatin Marth Dec 8 '09 at 15:46
    
IE and firefox are indexing them differently – user105033 Dec 8 '09 at 15:54
    
@unknown: not with the markup in the question. cNs[1].childNodes[1] is borked in all browsers, since you don't have whitespace anywhere between tags. – Crescent Fresh Dec 8 '09 at 16:00
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The iframe DOM node has a property called contentDocument which will be the equivalent of document, but for that iframe.

If the page being displayed is on another server tho (or even on a different port on the same server) you will get a security exception trying to access it.

Not sure if this works for IE.

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why does frame1.document.location work fine then? – user105033 Dec 8 '09 at 15:41
    
frame1.document.location works because you are changing the frame's location without being able to read anything from it. For example, you could have a large iframe which loaded either Facebook or Myspace when you clicked a button, but the javascript may not have access to the contents of either, because it could steal your personal data. – Phil H Dec 8 '09 at 15:44
    
contentDocument is also null – user105033 Dec 8 '09 at 16:00

I'm not all that familiar with javascript but it looks like you're using cNs incorrectly. It looks as though it is an array containing the child nodes and the code

cNs[1].childNodes[1].document.location = 'someurl.pl';

is trying to get the child nodes that do not exist. Try this it might work.

cNs[1].document.location = 'someurl.pl';
share|improve this answer

EDIT: frame1 should be:

cNs[0].childNodes[0].document.location

Remember that things are 0 indexed.

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in IE this works, in firefox my elements are indexed at 1,1 not 0,0 – user105033 Dec 8 '09 at 15:55
    
Check out quirksmode.org/js/detect.html for a quick tutorial on browser detection if things are being indexed differently. – Nathan Wheeler Dec 8 '09 at 16:10

You can also reference the reliable contentWindow property to get to that iFrame's document object as such:

cNs[0].childNodes[0].contentWindow.document
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