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I am doing some practice problems for a competition and I have been working on this algorithm like all day. If you want to read the whole problem here it is, but I will give you a short explanation because it is kind of a long problem.

Problem:

You have to verify ID numbers by plugging the ID number into a checksum. The ID needs to be converted to base-10 before you can plug it into the algorithm. The ID number starts out as letters:

Z = 0, Y = 1, X = 2, W = 3, V = 4

I am not having trouble with the conversion from these letters to base-10, my conversion code is good so I'll show you the next part of the problem:

Part 2:

Once you have your base-10 ID number you need to plug it into the following algorithm:

Note: each ID number MUST be 8 digits long, 0's will precede a number that is not at least 8 digits.

checksum = F(0, d0) X F(1, d1) X F(2, d2) ...

So to simplify:

checksum = F(n, dn) X F(n+1, dn) ...
where n is the index of the digit

What is most important here, is that X is not the operation * (multiply). X is it's own operation defined later.

Note: The most significant digit seems to be d7 but I'm not sure, the problem is not very clear about it.


Here are the definitions for f(n1, n2), g(n) and the operator X:

f(n1, n2) =

f(n1, n2)

g(n) =

g(n)

operator X:

Operator X

I assumed mod is the same thing as % in my code, I was not sure if there was another mod operation I am not familiar with.

My Structure

This is how I decided I wanted to solve the problem:

  1. Convert the base-10 number into int[8]
  2. Put each digit of the int[8] through f(n, dn)
  3. Use the X operator to then combine them all together.

My Code

Here are my algorithm functions. I can comment them if they are confusing somewhere, but they really follow the algorithm listed above exactly.

/*
 * This will return the checksum of the id.
 * Formula: F(0, d0) X F(1, d1) ...
 * 
 * F(n, dn) where n is the current index.
 * X != * (multiply)!! X is a defined operator
 */
public static int getChecksum(int[] id)
{
    int result = 0;

    for(int x = 0;x < id.length;x++)
    {
        if(x == 0)
            result = fOfxd(x, id[x]);
        else{
            result = opX(result, fOfxd(x, id[x]));
        }
    }

    return result;
}

public static int gOfx(int x)
{
    return GOFX[x];
}

public static int fOfxd(int x, int d)
{
    switch(x)
    {
        case 0:
            return d;
        case 1:
            return gOfx(d);
        default:
            return fOfxd(x - 1, gOfx(d));
    }
}

public static int opX(int num1, int num2)
{
    if(num1 < 5 && num2 < 5)
        return (num1 + num2) % 5;
    if(num1 < 5 && num2 >= 5)
        return (num1 + (num2 - 5)) % 5 + 5;
    if(num1 >= 5 && num2 < 5)
        return ((num1 - 5) - num2) % 5 + 5;
    return (num1 - num2) % 5;
}

public static final int[] GOFX = {1, 5, 7, 6, 2, 8, 3, 0, 9, 4};

Now, here is my main(String args[]) code:

Note: You can assume the functions parseBase10, and toArray are functioning properly. I have checked them with the input / output examples in the problem.

public static void main(String args[])
{
    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

    while(true)
    {
        int ids = 0; // how many ids are we checking?
        try
        {
            ids = Integer.parseInt(reader.readLine()); // get user input

            String[] list = new String[ids]; // will hold all of the ids

            for(int x = 0;x < list.length;x++)
                list[x] = reader.readLine(); // reads all of the ids we will be checking

            for(int x = 0;x < list.length;x++) // lets check the ids individually now
            {
                String stringID = list[x]; // the string representation of the id
                int base10 = parseBase10(stringID);
                int[] id = toArray(base10);
                int checksum = getChecksum(id);

                System.out.println(stringID);
                System.out.println(base10);
                System.out.println(Arrays.toString(id));
                System.out.println(checksum);

            }
        }catch(Exception e){e.printStackTrace();}
        break;
    }
}

Want to compile it yourself?

Here is my full (unedited) code:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class Main 
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        while(true)
        {
            int ids = 0; // how many ids are we checking?
            try
            {
                ids = Integer.parseInt(reader.readLine()); // get user input

                String[] list = new String[ids]; // will hold all of the ids

                for(int x = 0;x < list.length;x++)
                    list[x] = reader.readLine(); // reads all of the ids we will be checking

                for(int x = 0;x < list.length;x++) // lets check the ids individually now
                {
                    String stringID = list[x]; // the string representation of the id
                    int base10 = parseBase10(stringID);
                    int[] id = toArray(base10);
                    int checksum = getChecksum(id);

                    System.out.println(stringID);
                    System.out.println(base10);
                    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(id));
                    System.out.println(checksum);

                }
            }catch(Exception e){e.printStackTrace();}
            break;
        }
    }

    /*
     * This will return the checksum of the id.
     * Formula: F(0, d0) X F(1, d1) ...
     * 
     * F(n, dn) where n is the current index.
     * X != * (multiply)!! X is a defined operator
     */
    public static int getChecksum(int[] id)
    {
        int result = 0;

        for(int x = 0;x < id.length;x++)
        {
            if(x == 0)
                result = fOfxd(x, id[x]);
            else{
                result = opX(result, fOfxd(x, id[x]));
            }
        }

        return result;
    }

    public static int gOfx(int x)
    {
        return GOFX[x];
    }

    public static int fOfxd(int x, int d)
    {
        switch(x)
        {
            case 0:
                return d;
            case 1:
                return gOfx(d);
            default:
                return fOfxd(x - 1, gOfx(d));
        }
    }

    public static int opX(int num1, int num2)
    {
        if(num1 < 5 && num2 < 5)
            return (num1 + num2) % 5;
        if(num1 < 5 && num2 >= 5)
            return (num1 + (num2 - 5)) % 5 + 5;
        if(num1 >= 5 && num2 < 5)
            return ((num1 - 5) - num2) % 5 + 5;
        return (num1 - num2) % 5;
    }

    /*
     * This will convert a number to an array equivalent of that number
     * The result will be 8 digites long with leading 0's if possible.
     * 
     * EX:
     * 12345 = {0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}
     */
    public static int[] toArray(int value)
    {
        int result[] = new int[8];

        for(int x = result.length - 1;x >= 0;x--)
        {
            result[x] = value % 10;
            value /= 10;
        }

        return result;
    }

    /*
     * converts a String sequence and converts it to a base 10 equivalent.
     * Z = 0, Y = 1, X = 2, W = 3, V = 4
     * 
     * EX:
     * YY = 11(base-5) = 6(base-10)
     */
    public static int parseBase10(String string) throws Exception
    {
        int multiplier = 1;
        int result = 0; // in base 10

        for(int x = string.length() - 1;x >= 0;x--)
        {
            char letter = string.charAt(x); // the letter we are parsing
            int value = -1; // initial value, set to -1 to check for parsing error

            for(int y = 0;y < VALUES.length;y++)
                if(letter == VALUES[y])
                    value = y; // letter found in VALUES[]

            if(value == -1)
                throw new Exception("Could not parse: " + letter); // the specified letter was not found

            result += (multiplier * value);
            /* ^^ this moves the value to the correct digit place by using a multiplier:
             * EX:
             * 
             * current result: 45 (base-10)
             * new value to parse: 2 (base-5)
             * 45(base-10) + (2(base-5) * 25(base-10)) = 245 <-- correct output
             */

            multiplier *= 5; // sets up multiplier for next value
        }

        return result;
    }

    public static final char[] VALUES = {'Z', 'Y', 'X', 'W', 'V'};
    public static final int[] GOFX = {1, 5, 7, 6, 2, 8, 3, 0, 9, 4};
}

Here is the input I am giving my problem:

6
WYYXWVZXX
YWYWYYXWVZYY
YWYWYYXWVZYX
YYZWYYXWVZYX
YXXWYYXWVZXW
XYXWYYXWXYY

Here is what I get:

WYYXWVZXX
1274262
[0, 1, 2, 7, 4, 2, 6, 2]
2  *0*
YWYWYYXWVZYY
81352381
[8, 1, 3, 5, 2, 3, 8, 1]
0
YWYWYYXWVZYX
81352382
[8, 1, 3, 5, 2, 3, 8, 2]
4
YYZWYYXWVZYX
59868007
[5, 9, 8, 6, 8, 0, 0, 7]
0
YXXWYYXWVZXW
73539888
[7, 3, 5, 3, 9, 8, 8, 8]
5  *0*
XYXWYYXWXYY
22520431
[2, 2, 5, 2, 0, 4, 3, 1]
3  *0*

Where you see the *0*'s is where I am supposed to be getting 0, but I am getting a different value. Where is my checksum algorithm messing up?

Thanks for reading all of that, feel free to ask for clarification on any part of my code.

share|improve this question
2  
This is going to be too long to get much attention (unless you post a bounty, I suppose). Please cut your program down and find the specific step in your algorithm that isn't producing the transform you're expecting (e.g., is the name->number part working? F(n, dn)?). –  chrylis Sep 7 '13 at 22:10
    
I am not sure exactly where it is going wrong, the example problem did not give specific inputs / outputs for each part of the checksum algorithm. If I do not get an answer I will post a bounty. –  John Sep 7 '13 at 22:11
    
Okay, but you can run the algorithm by hand on paper. Compare that to your program's output at each stage. –  chrylis Sep 7 '13 at 22:13
    
The algorithm is very complex, it could a very long time to run an ID through the algorithm by hand. –  John Sep 7 '13 at 22:16
1  
@John: Welcome to debugging complex code. –  chrylis Sep 7 '13 at 22:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+50

BUG 1

The error is subtle. First of all, the digit description in the problem is: d7 d6 ... d1 d0 that means, d0 is the unit value of the decimal number.

Then, they say that F is left associative, and describe the process as :

F(0,d0) x F(1,d1) x F(2,d2) x ... x F(6,d6) x F(7,d7)

that means, you must first apply F to the operator to d0. BUT when you create the int array, the element at the 0 index is d7 , and since in this case the order matters, you get a wrong result.

To solve, you just have to reverse your int array rapresentation of the decimal value.

BUG 2

The second mistake is in the operation modulo 5. As you can read in the note of the problem, they say :

Note that -4 mod 5 = 1.

So copy-pasting hte operator x is a mistake. Change it with:

public static int opX(int num1, int num2)
{
    if(num1 < 5 && num2 < 5)
        return (num1 + num2) % 5;
    if(num1 < 5 && num2 >= 5)
        return (num1 + (num2 - 5)+5) % 5 + 5;
    if(num1 >= 5 && num2 < 5)
        return ((num1 - 5) - num2+20) % 5 + 5;
    return (num1 - num2 +10) % 5;
}

and you'll get the expected result.

Here is the result with both bugs fixed :

1274262
[2, 6, 2, 4, 7, 2, 1, 0]
0
YWYWYYXWVZYY
81352381
[1, 8, 3, 2, 5, 3, 1, 8]
0
YWYWYYXWVZYX
81352382
[2, 8, 3, 2, 5, 3, 1, 8]
1
YYZWYYXWVZYX
59868007
[7, 0, 0, 8, 6, 8, 9, 5]
0
YXXWYYXWVZXW
73539888
[8, 8, 8, 9, 3, 5, 3, 7]
0
XYXWYYXWXYY
22520431
[1, 3, 4, 0, 2, 5, 2, 2]
0

EDIT

For a more general solution of the BUG 2, check Martijn Courteaux answer.

share|improve this answer
    
so d0 is the most significant value in the algorithm? –  John Sep 7 '13 at 22:52
    
I just changed my toArray method to return a reversed list and it is still wrong unfortunately, I think you are right though, I think that I was putting my array through the algorithm backwards. –  John Sep 7 '13 at 23:00
    
@John Added a second bug, now things work just fine –  Save Sep 7 '13 at 23:22
    
You spotted the mod bug as well, but still didn't fix it. Adding 20 doesn't fix it everywhere. –  Martijn Courteaux Sep 7 '13 at 23:23
    
@MartijnCourteaux yes it does in this particular case, since numbers are limited by the modulus. I'll redo the math about that to be sure that 20 is enough :) it's not an elegant solution, i admit that. –  Save Sep 7 '13 at 23:25

Your mod logic is broken. The website says:

Note that -4 % 5 = 1.

In Java, this is not true: (-4) % 5 == -4. So implement your own mod(int a, int b) method:

public static int mod(int a, int b)
{
    while (a < 0) a += b;
    while (a >= b) a -= b;
    return a;
}

Or a more performant implementation as suggested by @durron597:

public static int mod(int a, int b)
{
    a %= b;
    return a < 0 ? a + b : a;
}

This is really important since you will have negative values here
(Eg: assume num1 = 5 and num2 = 4):

if(num1 >= 5 && num2 < 5)
    return ((num1 - 5) - num2) % 5 + 5;
share|improve this answer
2  
Um, this is really slow. Why not do int temp = a % b; if(temp < 0) temp += b; return temp; Especially if OP is looking to be competitive! –  durron597 Sep 8 '13 at 0:05
    
Good point! I'll edit. Thanks for the hint. –  Martijn Courteaux Sep 8 '13 at 0:08
    
Haha, I never think to edit the input parameters. All the code I write may as well have every method parameter be final :) –  durron597 Sep 8 '13 at 0:14
    
Yes, I prefer it this way, because you can avoid an unnecessary stack push/pop. –  Martijn Courteaux Sep 8 '13 at 0:16

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