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I have two classes, one called Clubs, and one called Date. - Date Extends Clubs

When I add this piece of code below: in the Clubs class it then messes up my Date class along with others that all extend Clubs.

public Clubs(Parcel in) { readFromParcel(in); }

this is my date class

public class Date extends Clubs {
    public Date(String day){
        clubName = day;
        date = "";
        eventType = "";     
    }
}

implicit super constructor Clubs() is undefined must explicitly invoke another constructor

The message above is the error I get when I hover on the red underline on public Date(String day){

Any help would be greatly appreciated:

Below I have posted the Clubs class

public class Clubs implements Parcelable{   
        protected String clubName;
        protected String address;
        protected String postcode;
        protected String contactName;
        protected String contactPhone;
        String date, eventType, scrutTime, startTime, eventName, week;


        public Clubs(String e){

        }

        public String getDetails() {
            return address + " " + postcode + " " + contactName + " " + contactPhone + " " + date + " " + eventType + " " + scrutTime + " ";    
        }

        public String getEvent() {          
                return date + " " + eventType; 
        }       

        public String getName(){
            return clubName;
        }

        public String getDate(){
            return date;
        }

        public String getWeek(){
            return week;
        }

        public String geteventName(){
            return eventName;
        }

        public void setEvent(String eventType, String date, String scrutTime, String startTime, String eventName, String week) {
            this.eventType = eventType;
            this.date = date; 
            this.scrutTime = scrutTime;
            this.startTime = startTime;
            this.eventName = eventName;
            this.week = week;
        }

        public void setEvent(String eventType, String date) {
            this.eventType = eventType;
            this.date = date; 
        }
share|improve this question
    
Please reconsider your choice of Date for a class name. Java already has two Date classes, and all you are going to do is confuse yourself. –  CommonsWare Sep 7 '13 at 22:23
    
Simply remember, that if you define a non-default constructor in class, it automatically means, that compiler will not generate the default one for you. That's why constructor Clubs() does not exist (just for future ; ) ) –  guitar_freak Sep 7 '13 at 22:48
    

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is that a sub class's constructor must first call to the Parent's constructor. If the parent has a default constructor (a constructor with no args) then it is called. In your case you have a constructor with args, so there is no default constructor and you must call the constructor explicitly:

public class Date extends Clubs {
    public Date(String day) {
        super(null); // You can either pass null or an actual object
        /// Rest of the code
}

Another option would be to create a default Parcel instance and pass it instead of passing null. You can also create a constructor that get a Parcel instance:

public class Date extends Clubs {
    public Date(Parcel p) {
        super(p);
        /// Rest of the code
}
share|improve this answer

When you write a subclass, the compiler automatically inserts the call to super-constructor (constructor of the superclass) as the first line in constructor of the subclass. However, your Clubs class does not have a default constructor (the one without parameters), and the compiler does not know with which String parameter to call the one that exists, so it complains.

To solve your problem, you must add as the first line in your Date constructor the following:

super("some string that makes sense in your case");
share|improve this answer

When there is no implicit constructor in the super class, you have to call one of the constructors directly.

The Clubs class in this example has the Clubs(Parcel in) constructor defined, that means, zou either have to create a constructor without arguments (public Clubs() {...}), or call it with the super(args) constructor call.

public class Date extends Clubs {
    public Date(String day,Parcel in){ // argument added
        super(in);            //this line added, passing argument to super constructor
        clubName = day;
        date = "";
        eventType = "";     
    }
}

Notes to consider:

  • the super constructor call must be the first in the constructor.
  • you are still in the constructor, the object is still not ready! before the super constructor had been called, only static functions can be called on the class!
share|improve this answer

When constructing a class that's a subclass (anything except new Object()), Java needs to start at the Object constructor and work its way down to ensure that all of the internal state of each class is ready for its subclass to use. If you don't have a call to a super constructor (which has to be the first statement), Java will try to use a no-argument implicit call to super(). You need to either call super with appropriate arguments for some constructor on Clubs or add a no-argument constructor to it.

share|improve this answer

The constructor of a class must always call the constructor of its superclass (and that will call its superclass constructor, and so on...).

You can explicitly call the superclass constructor by using super([constructor parameters]). If you do not explicitly call it, a call to the default constructor (that is, the one without parameters) of the superclass will automatically be added.

The issue arises when the superclass does not have a default constructor, there you are forced to specify which constructor of the superclass will be invoked (and with which parameters) by using the super([constructor parameters]) instruction. In your case, it will probably be super(day);

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