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new to Python and had a question about dictionaries. I have a dictionary that I declared in a particular order and want to keep it in that order all the time. The keys/values can't really be kept in order based on their value, I just want it in the order that I declared it.

So if I have the dictionary:

d = {'ac':33, 'gw':20, 'ap':102, 'za':321, 'bs':10}

It isn't in that order if I view it or iterate through it, is there any way to make sure Python will keep the explicit order that I declared the keys/values in?

Using Python 2.6

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3  
Can you clarify why you want to keep this "in order"? –  Peter Hansen Dec 8 '09 at 16:01
1  
I agree with Peter Hansen here. A dictionary is not meant to store order, but rather to store key/value pairs and have different access/add times to normal lists. –  Zoran Pavlovic Jan 28 '13 at 9:24

7 Answers 7

from collections import OrderedDict
OrderedDict((word, True) for word in words)

contains

OrderedDict([('He', True), ('will', True), ('be', True), ('the', True), ('winner', True)])

If the values are True (or any other immutable object), you can also use:

OrderedDict.fromkeys(words, True)
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1  
Worth noting, of course, that the 'immutable' part isn't a hard and fast rule that Python will enforce - its "only" a good idea. –  lvc Jun 11 '12 at 14:37
    
Thank you eumiro. It worked :) –  TE0 Jun 11 '12 at 15:29
    
be aware that solutions like: OrderedDict(FUTURE=[], TODAY=[], PAST=[]) wont't work, when mentioned aproach: OrderedDict([('FUTURE', []), ('TODAY', []), ('PAST', [])]) will keep order. –  andi Jun 5 at 13:47

python dictionaries are unordered. If you want an ordered dictionary, try collections.OrderedDict.

Note that OrderedDict was introduced into the standard library in python 2.7. If you have an older version of python, you can find recipes for ordered dictionaries on ActiveState.

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Dictionaries will use an order that makes searching efficient, and you cant change that,

You could just use a list of objects (a 2 element tuple in a simple case, or even a class), and append items to the end. You can then use linear search to find items in it.

Alternatively you could create or use a different data structure created with the intention of maintaining order.

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I had a similar problem when developing a Django project. I couldn't use OrderedDict, because I was running an old version of python, so the simple solution was to use Django's SortedDict class:

https://code.djangoproject.com/wiki/SortedDict

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Generally, you can design a class that behaves like a dictionary, mainly be implementing the methods __contains__, __getitem__, __delitem__, __setitem__ and some more. That class can have any behaviour you like, for example prividing a sorted iterator over the keys ...

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I came across this post while trying to figure out how to get OrderedDict to work. PyDev for Eclipse couldn't find OrderedDict at all, so I ended up deciding to make a tuple of my dictionary's key values as I would like them to be ordered. When I needed to output my list, I just iterated through the tuple's values and plugged the iterated 'key' from the tuple into the dictionary to retrieve my values in the order I needed them.

example:

test_dict = dict( val1 = "hi", val2 = "bye", val3 = "huh?", val4 = "what....")
test_tuple = ( 'val1', 'val2', 'val3', 'val4')
for key in test_tuple: print(test_dict[key])

It's a tad cumbersome, but I'm pressed for time and it's the workaround I came up with.

note: the list of lists approach that somebody else suggested does not really make sense to me, because lists are ordered and indexed (and are also a different structure than dictionaries).

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if you would like to have a dictionary in a specific order, you can also create a list of lists, where the first item will be the key, and the second item will be the value and will look like this example

>>> list =[[1,2],[2,3]]
>>> for i in list:
...     print i[0]
...     print i[1]

1
2
2
3
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That is not a "dictionary" because you cannot lookup items by their key without searching through the entire collection (taking O(n) time). –  BHSPitMonkey May 1 at 0:09

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