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So, I have a struct inside of other struct.. and I whant to know how I can malloc that struct...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

struct 
{
    int n, o, p;
    struct
    {
        int a, b, c;
    }Str2;
}Str1;

main()
{
   struct Str1.Str2 *x (Str1.Str2*)malloc(sizeof(struct Str1.Str2*));

   x->a = 10;
}

So, I try that, but, not work.. How I can make this, Or is more better allocate all struct ?

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4 Answers 4

You just need to allocate Str1 and Str2 would be allocated automatically. On my system, the sizeof for Str1 is 24 which equals to the size of 6 ints. Try this:

typedef struct {
int n;
int o;
int p;
struct {
      int a;
      int b;
      int c;
      }Str2;
}Str1;

main()
{
     Str1 *x = (Str1 *)malloc(sizeof(Str1));
     x->Str2.a = 10;
     printf("sizeof(Str1) %d\n", (int)sizeof(Str1));
     printf("value of a: %d\n", x->Str2.a);
}
share|improve this answer

Str1 and Str2 are objects of the anonymous structs you declared, so the syntax is way off. Did you forget some typedefs?

//declares a single object Str1 of an anonymous struct
struct 
{
}Str1;

//defines a new type - struct Str1Type
typedef struct
{
}Str1Type;
share|improve this answer

To name a struct, you use

 struct Str1
 {
    ... 
 };

You can now use struct Str1 when you want to refer to this particular struct.

If you want to use it as Str1 only, you need to use typedef, e.g.

typedef struct tagStr1
{
  ...
} Str1;

Or typedef struct Str1 Str1; if we have the first type of struct Str1 declaration.

To create an instance of a struct with no name (Instance means "a variable of that type"):

 struct
 {
   ...
 } Instance;

Since this struct doesn't have a name, it can't be used anywhere else, which is generally not what you want.

In C (as opposed to C++) you can not define a new type structure inside another the type definition of another structure, so

typedef struct tagStr1
{
    int a, b, c;
    typedef struct tagStr2
    {
       int x, y, z;
    } Str2;
} Str1;

will not compile.

If we change the code to this:

typedef struct tagStr1
{
    int a, b, c;
    struct tagStr2
    {
       int x, y, z;
    };
} Str1;
typedef struct tagStr2 Str2;

will compile - but at least gcc gives a warning for "struct tagStr2 does not declare anythign" (because it expects you wanted to actually have a member of type struct tagStr2 inside Str1.

share|improve this answer
    
oook, and to use: struct Str2 x = (struct Str2)malloc(sizeof(struct Str2*)); x->x = 10; –  Alexandre Sep 8 '13 at 1:16
    
Not sizeof(struct Str2*) - that makes space for only a pointer. sizeof(struct Str2); –  Mats Petersson Sep 8 '13 at 9:35

Why not declare things like:

typedef struct
{
    int a, b, c;
}Str2;

typedef struct 
{
    int n, o, p;
    Str2 s2;
}Str1;

Then you can allocate them individually as you desire. For instance:

Str2 *str2 = (Str2*)malloc(sizeof(Str2));
Str1 *str1 = (Str1*)malloc(sizeof(Str1));
s1->s2.a = 0; // assign 0 to the a member of the inner Str2 of str1.
share|improve this answer
    
Ooook, and to use this ?? .. struct Str1 x = (struct Str1)malloc(sizeof(struct Str1*)); and x->s2.a = 10 ? –  Alexandre Sep 8 '13 at 1:08

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