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I'm a relative novice to pandas, and I'm not sure how to approach this. I'm analyzing ticket flow through a Help Desk system. Raw data looks like this (with many more columns, and sometimes spanning days):

    TicketNo SvcGroup           CreatedAt                   ClosedAt
0    4237941     Unix 2013-07-28 03:55:00 2013-07-28 11:01:37.346438
1    4238041  Windows 2013-07-28 04:59:00 2013-07-28 18:25:02.193182
2    4238051  Windows 2013-07-28 05:09:00 2013-07-28 23:11:12.003673
3    4238291  Windows 2013-07-28 05:10:00 2013-07-28 05:32:51.547251
4    4238321     Unix 2013-07-28 01:15:00        2013-07-28 10:09:20
5    4238331     Unix 2013-07-28 01:53:00 2013-07-28 17:42:56.192088
6    4238561  Windows 2013-07-28 02:03:00 2013-07-28 06:34:09.455042
7    4238691  Windows 2013-07-28 02:03:00 2013-07-28 20:54:47.306731
8    4238811  Windows 2013-07-28 03:23:00 2013-07-28 13:15:20.823505
9    4238851  Windows 2013-07-28 04:16:00 2013-07-28 23:51:55.561463
10   4239011     Unix 2013-07-28 04:26:00 2013-07-28 09:27:06.275342
11   4239041  Windows 2013-07-28 04:38:00 2013-07-28 07:55:34.416621
12   4239131     Unix 2013-07-28 08:15:00 2013-07-28 08:46:42.380739
13   4239141  Windows 2013-07-28 01:08:00 2013-07-28 15:37:12.266341

I want to look at the data by hour, to see how tickets are flowing through the Help Desk by shift - so an intermediate step could be something like this:

                        Opened  Open  Closed  CarryFwd
TicketNo SvcGroup Hour
4237941  Unix     3          1     1       0         1
                  4          0     1       0         1
                  5          0     1       0         1
                  6          0     1       0         1
                  7          0     1       0         1
                  8          0     1       0         1
                  9          0     1       0         1
                  10         0     1       0         1
                  11         0     1       1         0
4239041  Windows  4          1     1       0         1
                  5          0     1       0         1
                  6          0     1       0         1
                  7          0     1       1         0

With a final result like (from grouping the above):

               Opened  Closed  CarryFwd
SvcGroup Hour
Unix     3          6       7        47
         4          7      10        44
         5          1       6        39
         6         11       2        48
         7          7       3        52
         8          5       5        52
         9          5      11        46
Windows  3          6       7        22
         4          3      10        15
         5          5       2        18
         6          6       2        22
         7         11      11        22
         8          2       4        20
         9          0       2        18   

Note: this is broken down by hour, but I could want to look at it by day, week, etc. Once I get to the above, then I can tell whether a Service Group is gaining ground, falling behind, etc.

Any ideas on how to approach this? The part I really can't figure out is how to take the CreatedAt to ClosedAt duration and break it down by discrete time intervals (hours, etc)...

Any guidance is greatly appreciated. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Have you given enough columns for us to create this table? How can we count Opened, Closed, CarryFwd at each stage? –  Andy Hayden Sep 8 '13 at 8:15
    
My impression is that he wants to do this: –  Jeff Tratner Sep 8 '13 at 11:44
    
Yes, all the information is there. Let me be more clear about definitions. "Opened" = the hour a ticket was created. "Closed" = the hour the ticket was completed / closed. "Open" is any hour the ticket was open, including the hour it was "Opened" and the hour it was "Closed". "CarryFwd" is all the hours it was "Open" EXCEPT the hour it was "Closed". So for ticket 4237941, Opened = 3, Closed = 11, Open = [3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11], and CarryFwd = [3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]. If a ticket was Opened and Closed in the same hour, say 9AM, then Opened = 9, Closed = 9, Open = [9], and CarryFwd = []. –  James Haskell Sep 8 '13 at 15:03
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is only a partial answer.

Read in your data, note had to combine 2 date/time columns

In [75]: df = read_csv(StringIO(data),sep='\s+',skiprows=1,parse_dates=[[3,4],[5,6]],header=None)

In [76]: df.columns = ['created','closed','idx','num','typ']

In [77]: df
Out[77]: 
               created                     closed  idx      num      typ
0  2013-07-28 03:55:00 2013-07-28 11:01:37.346438    0  4237941     Unix
1  2013-07-28 04:59:00 2013-07-28 18:25:02.193182    1  4238041  Windows
2  2013-07-28 05:09:00 2013-07-28 23:11:12.003673    2  4238051  Windows
3  2013-07-28 05:10:00 2013-07-28 05:32:51.547251    3  4238291  Windows
4  2013-07-28 01:15:00        2013-07-28 10:09:20    4  4238321     Unix
5  2013-07-28 01:53:00 2013-07-28 17:42:56.192088    5  4238331     Unix
6  2013-07-28 02:03:00 2013-07-28 06:34:09.455042    6  4238561  Windows
7  2013-07-28 02:03:00 2013-07-28 20:54:47.306731    7  4238691  Windows
8  2013-07-28 03:23:00 2013-07-28 13:15:20.823505    8  4238811  Windows
9  2013-07-28 04:16:00 2013-07-28 23:51:55.561463    9  4238851  Windows
10 2013-07-28 04:26:00 2013-07-28 09:27:06.275342   10  4239011     Unix
11 2013-07-28 04:38:00 2013-07-28 07:55:34.416621   11  4239041  Windows
12 2013-07-28 08:15:00 2013-07-28 08:46:42.380739   12  4239131     Unix
13 2013-07-28 01:08:00 2013-07-28 15:37:12.266341   13  4239141  Windows

In [78]: df.dtypes
Out[78]: 
created    datetime64[ns]
closed     datetime64[ns]
idx                 int64
num                 int64
typ                object
dtype: object

For each even, put a 1 where it is in the range (created-closed). Fill the nan's with 0's.

In [82]: m = df.apply(lambda x: Series(1,index=np.arange(x['created'].hour,x['closed'].hour+1)),axis=1).fillna(0)

In [81]: m
Out[81]: 
    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23
0    0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
1    0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0
2    0   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
3    0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4    1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
5    1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0
6    0   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
7    0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0
8    0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
9    0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
10   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
11   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
12   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
13   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0

Join it to the original dataset and set the index

In [83]: y = df[['num','typ']].join(m).set_index(['num','typ'])

In [84]: y
Out[84]: 
                 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23
num     typ                                                                                                
4237941 Unix      0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4238041 Windows   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0
4238051 Windows   0   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
4238291 Windows   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4238321 Unix      1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4238331 Unix      1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0
4238561 Windows   0   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4238691 Windows   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0
4238811 Windows   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4238851 Windows   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
4239011 Unix      0   0   0   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4239041 Windows   0   0   0   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4239131 Unix      0   0   0   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
4239141 Windows   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0

At this point you can do computations

Opened/Closed are straightforward edge detection. Carry Fwd is just m.where(m==1)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jeff!! Good stuff - I really appreciate giving me your time and insights. –  James Haskell Sep 9 '13 at 1:15
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Here's another way...

Create a function which takes a row and creates the following corresponding DataFrame:

def sparse_opened_closed(row):
    opened_hour, closed_hour = row['CreatedAt'].hour, row['ClosedAt'].hour
    hours = xrange(opened_hour, closed_hour + 1)
    index = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples((row['TicketNo'], row['SvcGroup'], h) for h in hours])
    opened, closed = np.zeros_like(hours), np.zeros_like(hours)
    opened[0], closed[-1] = 1, 1
    open, carry = np.ones_like(hours), np.ones_like(hours)
    carry[-1] = 0
    return pd.DataFrame({'Opened': opened, 'Open': open, 'Closed': closed, 'CarryFwd': carry}, index=index)

You could certainly make this more efficient.

Now, iterate through each of the rows and concat:

In [11]: pd.concat(sparse_opened_closed(row) for _, row in df.iterrows()).head(10)
Out[11]:
                    CarryFwd  Closed  Open  Opened
4237941 Unix    3          1       0     1       1
                4          1       0     1       0
                5          1       0     1       0
                6          1       0     1       0
                7          1       0     1       0
                8          1       0     1       0
                9          1       0     1       0
                10         1       0     1       0
                11         0       1     1       0
4238041 Windows 4          1       0     1       1
share|improve this answer
    
Cool! Thanks for the alternate idea! –  James Haskell Sep 10 '13 at 14:02
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