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I have a project of multiple .c and .h files and i write my own Makefile. How to configure Eclipse to use my Makefile and my source files from their original locations?

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4 Answers

You can create a custom Makefile and make sure it's in your project root. Then you need to disable the auto generated makefiles. You can do that by going here:

Project Properties (right click on project and select properties) -> C/C++ Build -> in that window uncheck "Generate Makefiles Automatically."

To use your own targets you can open the View called "Make Target":

Window -> Show View -> Make Target

In that view you can create a new target that will use the corresponding target in your custom Makefile.

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There is an option to create a project from existing makefiles: use the "Project Wizard" and select "Makefile project".

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@Stoiko: does my answer satisfy you? –  jldupont Dec 10 '09 at 3:23
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Does that let you edit your Makefile instead of having to do it Eclipse's way? –  Peter Cordes Dec 11 '09 at 2:52
    
@Peter: you can edit your makefiles as you which and Eclipse doesn't touch it... at least that's how I have used it. Maybe there are esoteric options that I haven't touched yet :-) –  jldupont Dec 11 '09 at 3:08
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You can disable "Generate makefiles automatically" in eclipse project properties -> c/c++ build (builder settings.)

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Also, there might be a line that says "default: esh $(PLUGIN_SO)," or something along those lines depending on your project. I've found that changing the "default" to "all" will enable the project to compile too. This is a handy feature, eclipse :)

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