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I made this code to remove the first bit and then append bits from the next element. Problem here is that at the 8th element its all zeros because of all the shifts that occur. This code is ugly but I think it works. I was just wondering if anyone could suggest a better way of doing this, and how would i remove that zero element that occurs every eight elements.

Thank you in advance.

note* only been coding for 6 weeks :P

#include "stdio.h"
#include "stdlib.h"

int main(void)
{
  unsigned char copy;
  int i, j, n;
  int shiftright;
  int shiftleft;
  shiftright = 6;
  shiftleft = 2;

  int counter = 0;
  printf("Enter a number of values to test: ");
  scanf("%d", &n);
  unsigned char* array = malloc(n * sizeof(unsigned char));

  copy = 0b01111111;
  printf("Initial Array:\n");
  for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
  {
    array[i] = copy;
    printf("%x ", array[i]);
  }

  printf("\n");
  // magic starts happening here
  i = 0;
  array[i] <<= 1;
  for (j = 0; j < n; j++)
  {
    // counter to check for the 8th element
    if (counter == 7)
    {
      counter = 0;
      j++;
      array[j] <<= 1;
    }
    counter++;
    printf("sweep: %d\n", j);
    // bitwise operations to remove zeros and append bits together 
    for (i = j; i < j + 1; i++)
    {
      if (array[i] == 0)
      {
        i++;
        j++;
      }
      copy = array[i + 1];
      copy >>= shiftright;
      array[i] |= copy;
      array[i + 1] <<= shiftleft;
      shiftright--;
      shiftleft++;
      if (shiftright == -1)
      {
        shiftright = 6;
      }
      if (shiftleft == 9)
      {
        shiftleft = 2;
      }
      for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
      {
        printf("%x ", array[i]);
      }
    }
    printf("\n");
  }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
please do not swear on SO, this is not the right place to do it –  No Idea For Name Sep 8 '13 at 6:08
    
You may want to elaborate what "first bit" means. Is it the most significant bit or the least. I'm pretty sure you meant the former (if this is what I think it is). –  WhozCraig Sep 8 '13 at 6:09
    
WhozCraig sorry yeah so notice how copy is 0b01111111, so i'm getting rid of that 0 by shifting it to the left, so then that leaves two free spaces to add in bits from the next element etc etc.. –  Scrooge Mc Fak Sep 8 '13 at 6:18
    
you should be able to run this code to see how it works. –  Scrooge Mc Fak Sep 8 '13 at 6:18
1  
Isn't that the author that should know how his code works? –  zubergu Sep 8 '13 at 7:28

1 Answer 1

to find the less significant bit use:

int least = num&1;

to find the most significant use the solution from Warren for leftmost set bit in a 32 bit int - he calls this routine flp2:

 uint32_t flp2(uint32_t x)
 {
    x |= (x >> 1);
    x |= (x >> 2);
    x |= (x >> 4);
    x |= (x >> 8);
    x |= (x >> 16);
    return x - (x >> 1);
 }

and with the two you can do:

int lastMostSig = 0;

for(j= 0 ; j < n; j++)
{
   array[i] = array[i] - (array[i] % 2);
   array[i] += lastMostSig;
   lastMostSig = flp2(array[i]);
   array[i] = array[i]<<1;
   array[i] = array[i]>>1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't find num % 2 particularly obvious when talking about bits. Why not num & 1? And besides, num % 2 is incorrect for negative num.. –  harold Sep 8 '13 at 9:56
    
@harold i accept your correction, but i'm not sure you are right about the negative part. i'm gonna check it –  No Idea For Name Sep 8 '13 at 10:00
    
It would give -1 for negative odd numbers, so it works when you use it as a condition, but the lsb doesn't really have the value -1 –  harold Sep 8 '13 at 10:04
    
@harold fixed it accordingly. tnx :) –  No Idea For Name Sep 8 '13 at 11:09

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