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void foo(const int constant)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
        // do stuff
        if(constant < 10) {              // Condition is tested million times :(
            // inner loop stuff
        }
    }
}

For every execution of the outer loop the value of "constant" is checked. However, constant never changes so a lot of CPU time is being wasted to test the condition constant < 10? over and over again. A human would realize after the first few passes that constant never changes, and intelligently avoid checking it over and over again. Does the compiler notice this and intelligently optimize it, or is the repeated if loop unavoidable?

Personally, I think the problem is unavoidable. Even if the compiler put the comparison before the outer loop and set some kind of boolean variable "skip_inner_stuff" this variable would still have to be checked for each pass of the outer for loop.

What are your thoughts on the matter? Is there a more efficient way to write the above code segment that would avoid the problem?

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1  
I think a good optimizer can do it. Did you check the generated assembly? –  user529758 Sep 8 '13 at 7:11
4  
The compiler would almost certainly optimise the test away. Best thing is to generate the assembly and see for yourself. –  Jonathan Potter Sep 8 '13 at 7:11
4  
If your compiler doesn't optimise this (in release mode, and without pragma/instructions not to)), then I'd suggest looking for a new compiler... –  Mitch Wheat Sep 8 '13 at 7:13
1  
@MitchWheat: well, depending on the size of do stuff, you might find that the compiler chooses not to optimize it. Which makes sense, because do stuff has to be duplicated unless a call to foo has been inlined into a place where constant is an i.c.e. And besides, if do stuff is a lot of code than the branch is likely to be relatively cheap. So I think the criterion should be that the compiler is able to perform the optimization, not necessarily that it actually does in this questioner's real code :-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 8 '13 at 9:43
1  
Even the compile doesn't optimize it, the constant may be kept in the register and never load again. And the branch predicate pattern will be recognized by the CPU, then the cost of if check will be ignorable compare to branch false predicate. –  ZijingWu Sep 9 '13 at 6:00

7 Answers 7

The optimization you describe is also called loop unswitching. It has been a standard part of optimizing compilers for many years - but if you want to make sure your compiler performs it, compile your sample code with some optimization level (e.g. -O2 in gcc) and check the generated code.

However, in cases where the compiler cannot prove that a piece of code is invariant throughout the loop - e.g. a call to an external function which is not available at compile time - then indeed, manually hoisting the code to be outside the loop can net a very big performance boost.

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I think the more well-known name is "loop invariant code motion" –  Mehrdad Sep 8 '13 at 8:22
    
No, this is not loop invariant code motion, this is loop unswitching. –  chill Sep 8 '13 at 9:06
    
@chill you are right and I am wrong. Fixed. –  Oak Sep 8 '13 at 9:59
3  
@EJP I think the core of the question here is about something that does not change inside the loop, not necessarily something which is a compile-time constant. So the if has to be performed at run-time, it just can be hoisted outside the loop. –  Oak Sep 8 '13 at 10:02
2  
@EJP: constant is not a compile-time constant, unless a call to foo has been inlined into a place where a compile-time constant is passed as the argument expression. Don't be fooled by the const -- unless a pointer or reference to constant escapes this function, the fact that constant is declared const neither helps nor hinders the optimizer. –  Steve Jessop Sep 8 '13 at 10:05

Compiler can optimize the code but you couldn't expect it does a magic tricks on your code.

The optimization strongly depends on your code and the usage of your code. For example if you use foo like this:

foo(12345);

Compiler can optimize the code very much. Even it can compute the result in compile time.

But if you use it like this:

int k;
cin >> k;
foo(k);

In this case it can not get rid of inner if (the value is provided in run-time).

I wrote a sample code with MinGW/GCC-4.8.0:

void foo(const int constant)
{
    int x = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
    {
        x++;
        if (constant < 10)
        {
            x--;
        }
    }
    cout << x << endl;
}

int main()
{
    int k;
    cin >> k;
    foo(k);
}

Let's see the generate assembly code:

004015E1  MOV EAX,0F4240                 // i = 1000000
004015E6  MOV EBP,ESP
004015E8  XOR EDX,EDX
004015EA  PUSH ESI
004015EB  PUSH EBX
004015EC  SUB ESP,10
004015EF  MOV EBX,DWORD PTR SS:[EBP+8]
004015F2  XOR ECX,ECX                    // set ECX to 0
004015F4  CMP EBX,0A                     // if constant < 10
          ^^^^^^^^^^
004015F7  SETGE CL                       // then set ECX to 1
004015FA  ADD EDX,ECX                    // add ECX to i
004015FC  SUB EAX,1                      // i--
004015FF  JNE SHORT 004015F2             // loop if i is not zero

As you can see the inner if exists in the code. See CMP EBX,0A.

I repeat again it strongly depends on the lines with loops.

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Others have covered the relevant compiler optimizations: loop unswitching which moves the test outside the loop and provides two separate loop bodies; and code inlining that will in some cases provide the compiler with the actual value of constant so that it can remove the test, and either execute 'inner loop stuff' unconditionally or remove it entirely.

Also be aware that quite aside from anything the compiler does, modern CPU designs actually do something similar to "A human would realize after the first few passes that constant never changes". It's called dynamic branch prediction.

The key point is that checking an integer is incredibly cheap, and even taking a branch can be very cheap. What's potentially expensive is mis-predicted branches. Modern CPUs use various strategies to guess which way a branch will go, but all of those strategies will quickly start correctly predicting a branch that goes the same way a million times in a row.

What I don't know, is whether modern CPUs are smart enough to spot that constant is a loop invariant and do the full loop unswitching in microcode. But assuming correct branch prediction, the loop unswitch is probably a minor optimization anyway. The more specific the processor family targeted by the compiler, the more it knows about the quality of its branch predictor, and the more likely it is that the compiler can determine whether the additional benefit of loop unswitching is worth the code bloat.

Of course there are still minimal CPUs, where the compiler has to provide all the cleverness. The CPU in your PC is not one of them.

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you could optimise it by hand:

void foo(const int constant)
{
    if (constant < 10) {
        for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
            // do stuff

           // inner loop stuff here
        }
    } else {
        for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
            // do stuff

            // NO inner loop stuff here
        }
    }
}

I don't know whether most compilers would do something like this, but it doesn't seem like too much of a stretch.

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D'oh why didn't I think of that! Thanks for the reply :) –  user1299784 Sep 8 '13 at 7:21
2  
This is basically what the compiler will do, if someone is happy to rely on the compiler to optimise, you get to avoid code duplication by leaving the condition inside the loop. –  Troy Sep 8 '13 at 7:25
    
This is called "loop unswitching" and is commonly implemented in compilers. –  chill Sep 8 '13 at 9:02

A good compiler might optimize it.

Compilers optimize based on cost analysis. A good compiler should thus estimate the cost of each alternative (with and without hoisting) and pick whichever is cheaper.

It means that if the code in the inner part is big, it might not be worth optimizing because this could lead to instruction cache trashing. On the other hand, if it is cheap, then it can be hoisted.

If it shows up in the profiler because it has not been optimized, the compiler messed up.

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A good compiler will optimize that (when optimizations are enabled).

If using GCC you could

  • compile with optimization and assembly code generation with

    gcc -Wall -O2 -fverbose-asm -S source.c
    

    then look (with some editor, or a pager like less) into the generated assembly code source.s

  • ask GCC to dump a lot (hundreds!) of intermediate files and look inside the intermediate gimple representation in it

    gcc -Wall -O2 -fdump-tree-all -c source.c
    
  • use MELT and its probe to look interactively inside the gimple.

Take the habit of always asking all warnings with -Wall from gcc (or g++ if compiling C++ code.

BTW, in practice, such an optimization ("loop invariant code hoisting" as the other answer explains) is essential, because such kind of intermediate code happens very often, e.g. after function inlining.... (imagine several calls to foo been inlined...)

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1  
A good compiler will optimize that => Nope. A good compiler will compute an estimated cost whether it's better to hoist the check out of the loop or not and then pick the cheapest alternative. –  Matthieu M. Sep 8 '13 at 10:33
1  
But that cost estimation is integral part of the optimization process, so the compiler is optimizing it (perhaps choosing to not move code if that is not worth it). –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 8 '13 at 10:44

Actually all the modern compiler does the optimization, and to abide this optimization if you think think that compiler shouldn't do this optimization you should make the variable as "volatile".

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