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We are planning to release one of our software under GPL. The problem is that the entire software is developed in Microsoft technologies (C# and SQL Server). The source code in my 100% ownership. Most of the GPL projects developed in open tools like php, python, java, mysql etc.. Is there any legal issues for publishing .net source code under GPL?

Thanks and regards

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Sure. GPL can be applied to any kind of source code. I am sure that there is already some .NET project using GPL. –  Thilo Sep 8 '13 at 7:38

3 Answers 3

In short statement: yes you can. It is because GPL it was written to give following rights

  1. to run the program, for any desired purpose,
  2. to study how the program works, and modify it,
  3. to redistribute copies and to improve the program, and release the improvements to the public

Moreover on SO there's a discussion how to apply GPL to C# code: Adding GNU GPL Licence to C# App

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Of course you can. There is nothing about the toolchain (or any toolchain I know of) that would prevent you from releasing your source code as open source.

The reason you don't see as many open source projects using .NET is that open source developers are traditionally less likely to use Microsoft technologies over the open source tools readily available on open source operating systems. While Mono runs C# and is open source, C# is nowhere near as popular on non-Windows systems.

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Well, for your own "100%" code, you can specify the licensing terms as you wish because you are the author and copyright holder. Therefore there is nothing that hinders you to say, it is GPL'ed and provide the source.

However, if you choose the GPL for your software, you should ensure that users who are getting it from you can comply with the GPL as well.

There is a question in the GPL FAQ that probably is interesting for you as I think it is related:

What it basically says is that the GPL has some protection so that the software can not be made non-free by exploiting the system-library clause. From your question nothing makes me assume you want to do that, I'm just linking it because I think this is one of the areas that weren't touched by the existing answers and which is probably worth to think about if interested in the topic.

I did remember the FAQ answer differently, I was looking that up some time ago because of some old Visual Basic Classic program I did release under GPL as well. I remember it as that it is possible to release under GPL however the question would be how useful it is if you need a proprietary compiler. So a "Yes, but ..." kind of answer. I think the compiler situation on Windows did improve since then (albeit not for Visual Basic classic, but that's a different story).

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