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I am facing a problem with select.

Below is my code snippet for receiving the data (server side):

int tcpip_receive_data (int sockfd, char *recv_buffer, int buffer_len, int flags, long sec_timeout)
{
 int ret = 0 ;
 fd_set fdsock ;
 struct timeval timeout = {0x00,} ;

 if ((sockfd < 0) || !(recv_buffer) || !(buffer_len))
 {
  return FAIL ;
 }

 if (sec_timeout > 0)
 {
  /* the socket to monitor */
  FD_ZERO (&fdsock) ;
  FD_SET ((unsigned int) sockfd, &fdsock) ;

  /* set a timeout */
  timeout.tv_sec = sec_timeout ;
  timeout.tv_usec = 0 ;

  /* now check whether some data is there or not */
  if ((ret = select (sockfd + 1, &fdsock, NULL, NULL, &timeout)) <= 0)
  {

   printf ("ERROR: Select() retValue[%d] for SockID[%d]%s:%d", ret, sockfd, __FILE__, __LINE__) ;
   return FAIL ; 
  }
  else if (ret == 0) 
  {
   printf ("ERROR: Select timed out for SockID[%d]- %s:%d", sockfd, __FILE__, __LINE__) ;
   return FAIL ;
  }

 }
 return (recv (sockfd, recv_buffer, buffer_len, flags)) ;
}

Below is my code snippet for sending the data ( client side):

int main ( int argc, char **argv )
{
                struct sockaddr_in sock_client;
                char ip_address [IP_ADDR_LEN] = {0,};
                char filename [MAXSTR] = {0,};
                int port = 0;
                int sock_fd = 0;
                FILE *input_fp = NULL;
                FILE *output_fp = NULL;
                int len = 0, ret = 0;
                char data [ BUF_SIZE ] = {0,};
                char recv_buffer [ BUF_SIZE ] = {0,};
                struct hostent *host;

                printf ("%d\n", argc);
                if ( argc != 4 ) 
                {   
                        fprintf ( stdout, "<Usage> ./wsp_client <IPAddress> <Port> <DataFilename>\n" );
                        return 0;
                }   

                strcpy ( ip_address ,argv[1] );
                port = atoi ( argv[2] );
                strcpy ( filename, argv[3] );

                printf ("%s:%d:%s\n", ip_address, port, filename );

                if ( ( input_fp = fopen ( filename, "rb" ) ) == NULL )
                {   
                        perror ("Input file fopen:");
                        return 0;
                }   

                if ( ( output_fp = fopen ( "./read_data", "wb" ) ) == NULL )
                {   
                        perror ("Outuput fopen:");
                        return 0;
                }   

                while ( !feof(input_fp) )
                {   
                                if ( ( ret = fread ( data, 1, BUF_SIZE, input_fp ) ) < 0 ) 
                                {   
                                        printf ("fread failed, ferror=[%d] feof=[%d]", ferror (stdin), feof(input_fp));

                                        break ;
                                }
                                len += ret;
                }

                fwrite ( data, sizeof (char), len, output_fp );
                fclose ( input_fp );
                fclose ( output_fp );

                //create a scoket.
                if ( ( sock_fd = socket ( AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0 ) ) < 0 )
                {
                        perror ( "Socket Error:" );
                        return 0;
                }

                //form the structure.
                host = gethostbyname(ip_address);
                sock_client.sin_family = AF_INET;
                sock_client.sin_port = htons (port);
                sock_client.sin_addr = *((struct in_addr *)host->h_addr);

                //connect
                printf ( "Connecting to port %d\n", port );
                if ( connect ( sock_fd, (struct sockaddr *) &sock_client, sizeof ( sock_client ) ) < 0 )
                {
                        perror ( "connect:" );
                        return 0;
                }

                printf ("Connection Established\n");

                printf ("Sending data of lenght:%d\n", len);
                if ( ( ret = send ( sock_fd, data, len, 0 ) ) < 0 )
                {
                        perror ("send:");
                        return 0;
                }
                printf ("Sent data of lenght:%d\n", len);

                recv (sock_fd, recv_buffer, BUF_SIZE, 0);

                close ( sock_fd );
}

The problem is the client program which i have written is able to send the data but the server is not able to receive the data. But the with other client program(actually a tool) I am able to send data and the server is able to receive the data and process the data received.

And from the tcpdump, there has been a connection established, and the client have sent data, and the server has acknowledged it( Please check the Wrieshark pasted below ). But the server is giving me the logs saying that timeout occurred.

enter image description here

Why is select is not waking up when the data present in the socket. Why it is getting timedout.

Please help me to sort the problem.

share|improve this question
1  
You could strace your program, and I suggest using poll instead of select –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 8 '13 at 7:54
1  
Your code is wrong. You are reading the entire file but only fwriting the last buffer. The fwrite() should be inside the loop. I don't see the purpose of the second file at all. –  EJP Sep 8 '13 at 8:08
    
FD_SET ((unsigned int) sockfd, &fdsock) try it without casting sockfd to unsigned int. –  James Chong Sep 8 '13 at 8:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The other side is not sending you any data. Whatever data you're sending it, it isn't sufficient to cause it to send you a reply. Your select is timing out because the specified time, 30 seconds, has passed.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply. Can I know what do u mean by "Whatever data you're sending it, it isn't sufficient to cause it to send you a reply". –  sach Sep 8 '13 at 8:02
2  
The other side is probably waiting for a "complete message", and whatever data you're sending, it doesn't consider complete. Maybe it's waiting for a newline. Maybe it's waiting for a zero byte. Maybe it's waiting for some particular number of bytes. Whatever. (Do you know what rules the other side follows?) If you call me on the phone and say "Hello, I'd like to speak to" and stop, you won't get an answer from me because I don't consider that a "complete message". I'll still be waiting for you to finish. –  David Schwartz Sep 8 '13 at 8:14
    
Okay, I understand it. But A socket is ready for reading if there is some data in the socket receive buffer right. –  sach Sep 8 '13 at 8:23
    
Thanks David. I did infact was not sending a complete message. I missed adding a new line in the end. But could please tell me how does select knows whether its a complete message or incomplete message? –  sach Sep 8 '13 at 8:38
    
@sach It doesn't. It's the other side that was waiting for a complete message, not your code. The other side probably emptied the receive buffer, realized it wasn't a complete message, and then went back to waiting for more data to be received. –  David Schwartz Sep 8 '13 at 16:16

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