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I'm working on this project and I want to utilize multi-thread in my code. So I developed this little piece of code and tested it but it turned out that it only uses one of the threads in my computer. Can someone please tell me what's wrong with it and how I can improve it?

public static int choiceCount(List<Character> charlist) throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {

    int coreCount = 8;
    ExecutorService e1 = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(coreCount);
    Integer total = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < coreCount; i++) {
        Future<Integer> result = e1.submit(new Count(coreCount, i, charlist));
        total += result.get();
    }
    e1.shutdown();
    return total;
}

And here's the Callable

class Count implements Callable<Integer> {
//where the processing code is
}

So when I run this program, it only uses 12.5% of my CPU which is one thread only... Ideas guys?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Invoking Future.get() right after ExecutorService.submit(callable) has no sense. It works just like synchronous invocation of callable.call(), but on a different thread, which means some unnecessary overhead. Make all submits in one loop, and all gets in another loop. – Alexei Kaigorodov Sep 9 '13 at 8:31
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is in your loop:

for (int i = 0; i < coreCount; i++) {
    Future<Integer> result = e1.submit(new Count(coreCount, i, charlist));
    total += result.get();
}

What this does, is:

  • submit a calculation
  • call get() on the Future object, which waits for the calculation to finish
  • then do the next iteration of the loop

So, in each iteration, your code is waiting for the calculation to be finished before you submit the next one.

You should create two loops, one to submit the calculations, which stores all the Future objects in a collection, and then a second loop which calls get() on each of the Future objects.

share|improve this answer

You have to save the Future object rather than wait for each one before submitting the next.

public static int choiceCount(List<Character> charlist) throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {

    int coreCount = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();
    ExecutorService e1 = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(coreCount);
    int total = 0;
    List<Future<Integer>> futures = new ArrayList<>();
    // start all the tasks, before
    for (int i = 0; i < coreCount; i++) 
        futures.add(e1.submit(new Count(coreCount, i, charlist)));
    // notify the executor to stop when finished in case get() throws an exception
    e1.shutdown(); 
    // collecting the results.
    for (Future<Integer> future: futures)
        total += future.get();
    return total;
}
share|improve this answer

You should create a list of List<Callable<Integer>> and then use invokeAll on the executor which will start all your computation threads.

List<Callable<Integer>> callables = new ArrayList<Callable<Integer>>();
for (int i = 0; i < coreCount; i++) {
    callables.add(new Count(coreCount, i, charlist));
}
List<Future<Integer>> futures = executor.invokeAll(callables); //why is it e1?
//Then you can wait for all computations to  finish by calling
for (Future<Integer> future : futures) {
    Integer result = future.get(); //blocks for computation to finish.
    //do something with result
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much! I had e1 cuz I was just experimenting with different threads but I changed it back. First time testing with multi-threading, had a lot of problems :D Thanks. This is brilliant! – Steven X. Han Sep 8 '13 at 10:53
    
+0 This is just another way of doing exactly the same thing as Executor.submit(), see Jesper's answer. – Peter Lawrey Sep 8 '13 at 13:55
1  
@PeterLawrey Thanks for +0. BTW, your answer is just an implementation of Jesper's answer. – bsd Sep 8 '13 at 14:58
    
@bsd True, showing the code might be clearer for some. – Peter Lawrey Sep 8 '13 at 15:36

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