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I have been trying to determine the type of a field in a class. I've seen all the introspection methods but haven't quite figured out how to do it. This is going to be used to generate xml/json from a java class. I've looked at a number of the questions here but haven't found exactly what I need.

Example:

class Person {
    public final String name;
    public final List<Person> children;
}

When I marshall this object, I need to know that the chidren field is a list of objects of type Person, so I can marshall it properly.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
List<Person> ? Unless I am missing the point. –  Woot4Moo Dec 8 '09 at 17:03
    
That is what I meant –  Juan Mendes Dec 8 '09 at 18:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Have a look at Obtaining Field Types from the Java Tutorial Trail: The Reflection API.

Basically, what you need to do is to get all java.lang.reflect.Field of your class and call Field#getType() on each of them (check edit below). To get all object fields including public, protected, package and private access fields, simply use Class.getDeclaredFields(). Something like this:

for (Field field : Person.class.getDeclaredFields()) {
    System.out.format("Type: %s%n", field.getType());
    System.out.format("GenericType: %s%n", field.getGenericType());
}

EDIT: As pointed out by wowest in a comment, you actually need to call Field#getGenericType(), check if the returned Type is a ParameterizedType and then grab the parameters accordingly. Use ParameterizedType#getRawType() and ParameterizedType#getActualTypeArgument() to get the raw type and an array of the types argument of a ParameterizedType respectively. The following code demonstrates this:

for (Field field : Person.class.getDeclaredFields()) {
    System.out.print("Field: " + field.getName() + " - ");
    Type type = field.getGenericType();
    if (type instanceof ParameterizedType) {
        ParameterizedType pType = (ParameterizedType)type;
        System.out.print("Raw type: " + pType.getRawType() + " - ");
        System.out.println("Type args: " + pType.getActualTypeArguments()[0]);
    } else {
        System.out.println("Type: " + field.getType());
    }
}

And would output:

Field: name - Type: class java.lang.String
Field: children - Raw type: interface java.util.List - Type args: class foo.Person
share|improve this answer
3  
Pascal -- you're super close. you want Type type = Field.getGenericType(); And then check if it's a ParameterizedType, then grab the parameters. This ends up being a rabbit hole -- asker needs to define limits or be prepared to write some pretty fancy code. –  wowest Dec 8 '09 at 18:10
    
Thanks wowest, that is exactly what I need in conjunction with ParameterizedType.getRawType and ParameterizedType.getActualArguments. –  Juan Mendes Dec 8 '09 at 18:55
    
I can't figure out how to mark your comment as the right answer so I'll just answer my own question so I can post an example –  Juan Mendes Dec 8 '09 at 18:58
1  
@Juan Mendes, you should be seeing a tick icon to the left of each of the answers, next to the vote number, just click on the one that belongs to the correct answer so it turns green. –  Iker Jimenez Dec 8 '09 at 20:54
    
I knew that I could mark this answer as the right answer. However, it was not correct until Pascal edited it to agree with wowest's comment. In any case, the example I listed below contains all the info I need but I don't want to mark my own answer as the right answer after so many people helped me. Pascal's example is still missing critical methods (ParameterizedType.getRawType and ParameterizedType.getActualArguments?). Pascal, could you edit the example so it shows those two methods being used? –  Juan Mendes Dec 9 '09 at 16:53

take this snippet:

 for (Field field : Person.class.getFields()) {
        System.out.println(field.getType());
 }

the key class is Field

share|improve this answer
    
That's public fields only (including static) with Class.getFields. Also it'll be the erased type. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 8 '09 at 17:27
    
then I misunderstood the question –  dfa Dec 8 '09 at 17:41

I haven't found any framework who determines a generic field type through the inheritance layers so i've written some method:

This logic determines the type through the field information and the current object class.

Listing 1 - logic:

public static Class<?> determineType(Field field, Object object) {
    Class<?> type = object.getClass();
    return (Class<?>) getType(type, field).type;
}

protected static class TypeInfo {
    Type type;
    Type name;

    public TypeInfo(Type type, Type name) {
        this.type = type;
        this.name = name;
    }

}

private static TypeInfo getType(Class<?> clazz, Field field) {
    TypeInfo type = new TypeInfo(null, null);
    if (field.getGenericType() instanceof TypeVariable<?>) {
        TypeVariable<?> genericTyp = (TypeVariable<?>) field.getGenericType();
        Class<?> superClazz = clazz.getSuperclass();

        if (clazz.getGenericSuperclass() instanceof ParameterizedType) {
            ParameterizedType paramType = (ParameterizedType) clazz.getGenericSuperclass();
            TypeVariable<?>[] superTypeParameters = superClazz.getTypeParameters();
            if (!Object.class.equals(paramType)) {
                if (field.getDeclaringClass().equals(superClazz)) {
                    // this is the root class an starting point for this search
                    type.name = genericTyp;
                    type.type = null;
                } else {
                    type = getType(superClazz, field);
                }
            }
            if (type.type == null || type.type instanceof TypeVariable<?>) {
                // lookup if type is not found or type needs a lookup in current concrete class
                for (int j = 0; j < superClazz.getTypeParameters().length; ++j) {
                    TypeVariable<?> superTypeParam = superTypeParameters[j];
                    if (type.name.equals(superTypeParam)) {
                        type.type = paramType.getActualTypeArguments()[j];
                        Type[] typeParameters = clazz.getTypeParameters();
                        if (typeParameters.length > 0) {
                            for (Type typeParam : typeParameters) {
                                TypeVariable<?> objectOfComparison = superTypeParam;
                                if(type.type instanceof TypeVariable<?>) {
                                    objectOfComparison = (TypeVariable<?>)type.type;
                                }
                                if (objectOfComparison.getName().equals(((TypeVariable<?>) typeParam).getName())) {
                                    type.name = typeParam;
                                    break;
                                }
                            }
                        }
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    } else {
        type.type = field.getGenericType();
    }

    return type;
}

Listing 2 - Samples / Tests:

class GenericSuperClass<E, T, A> {
    T t;
    E e;
    A a;
    BigDecimal b;
}

class GenericDefinition extends GenericSuperClass<Integer, Integer, Integer> {

}

@Test
public void testSimpleInheritanceTypeDetermination() {
    GenericDefinition gd = new GenericDefinition();
    Field field = ReflectionUtils.getField(gd, "t");
    Class<?> clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, gd);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Integer.class);
    field = ReflectionUtils.getField(gd, "b");
    clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, gd);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, BigDecimal.class);
}

class MiddleClass<A, E> extends GenericSuperClass<E, Integer, A> { }

// T = Integer, E = String, A = Double
class SimpleTopClass extends MiddleClass<Double, String> { }

@Test
public void testSimple2StageInheritanceTypeDetermination() {
    SimpleTopClass stc = new SimpleTopClass();
    Field field = ReflectionUtils.getField(stc, "t");
    Class<?> clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, stc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Integer.class);
    field = ReflectionUtils.getField(stc, "e");
    clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, stc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, String.class);
    field = ReflectionUtils.getField(stc, "a");
    clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, stc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Double.class);
}

class TopMiddleClass<A> extends MiddleClass<A, Double> { }

// T = Integer, E = Double, A = Float
class ComplexTopClass extends TopMiddleClass<Float> {}

@Test void testComplexInheritanceTypDetermination() {
    ComplexTopClass ctc = new ComplexTopClass();
    Field field = ReflectionUtils.getField(ctc, "t");
    Class<?> clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, ctc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Integer.class);
    field = ReflectionUtils.getField(ctc, "e");
    clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, ctc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Double.class);
    field = ReflectionUtils.getField(ctc, "a");
    clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, ctc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Float.class);
}

class ConfusingClass<A, E> extends MiddleClass<E, A> {}
// T = Integer, E = Double, A = Float ; this class should map between a and e
class TopConfusingClass extends ConfusingClass<Double, Float> {}

@Test
public void testConfusingNamingConvetionWithInheritance() {
    TopConfusingClass tcc = new TopConfusingClass();
    Field field = ReflectionUtils.getField(tcc, "t");
    Class<?> clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, tcc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Integer.class);
    field = ReflectionUtils.getField(tcc, "e");
    clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, tcc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Double.class);
    field = ReflectionUtils.getField(tcc, "a");
    clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, tcc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Float.class);
    field = ReflectionUtils.getField(tcc, "b");
    clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, tcc);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, BigDecimal.class);
}

class Pojo {
    Byte z;
}

@Test
public void testPojoDetermineType() {
    Pojo pojo = new Pojo();
    Field field = ReflectionUtils.getField(pojo, "z");
    Class<?> clazz = ReflectionUtils.determineType(field, pojo);
    Assert.assertEquals(clazz, Byte.class);
}

I'm looking forward to hear your feedback!

share|improve this answer

As dfa points out, you can get the erased type with java.lang.reflect.Field.getType. You can get the generic type with Field.getGenericType (which may have wildcards and bound generic parameters and all sorts of craziness). You can get the fields through Class.getDeclaredFields (Class.getFields will give you public fields (including those of the supertpye) - pointless). To get the base type fields, go through Class.getSuperclass. Note to check modifiers from Field.getModifiers - static fields probably will not be interesting to you.

share|improve this answer

Here's an example that answers my question

class Person {
  public final String name;
  public final List<Person> children;  
}

//in main
Field[] fields = Person.class.getDeclaredFields();
for (Field field : fields) {
  Type type = field.getGenericType();
  System.out.println("field name: " + field.getName());
  if (type instanceof ParameterizedType) {
    ParameterizedType ptype = (ParameterizedType) type;
    ptype.getRawType();
    System.out.println("-raw type:" + ptype.getRawType());
    System.out.println("-type arg: " + ptype.getActualTypeArguments()[0]);
  } else {
    System.out.println("-field type: " + field.getType());
  }
}

This outputs

field name: name
-field type: class java.lang.String
field name: children
-raw type:interface java.util.List
-type arg: class com.blah.Person
share|improve this answer

Here is a somewhat longer explanation of Java Reflection and Generics which also covers generic method and field types:

http://tutorials.jenkov.com/java-reflection/generics.html

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice! Wish I had found your page before I posted the question. –  Juan Mendes Dec 11 '09 at 18:10

if you want to compare the field type you should try this

if( field.getType().isAssignableFrom(String.class)){}

or

if( field.getType().isAssignableFrom(YOURCLASS.class)){}
share|improve this answer
    
This does not determine the type of a field. This assumes you know what class you're looking for (String, YOURCLASS) and you just want to test if you can assign it. –  Juan Mendes Jan 25 '11 at 15:34

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