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As far as I read up on lists and classes, if you have a list of instances of a certain class and .Add() them to a list, the reference should be added. So if you modify the original instance, and then access it via the list, you should get the modified version.

Here is the structure of my code:

public class Config()
{
    public List<Item> listOfItems = new List<Item>();
    public Item item1 = new Item();
    public Item item2 = new Item();

    ...
    Config()
    {
        listOfItems.Add(item1);
        listOfItems.Add(item2);
        ...
    }
}

public class Item
{ 
    public string name;

    Item()
    { 
        name = "Not Set";
        ...
    }
}

and somewhere in my main code I'd use currentConfig, which is an instance of the Config class:

currentConfig.item1.name = "A";
currentConfig.item2.name = "B";

for (int i = 0; i < currentConfig.listOfItems.Count; i++)
{ 
    DoSomething(currentConfig.listOfItems[i].name);
}

But that does not give me the current value of item1.name and item2.name, but rather "Not set". What am I doing wrong?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
Do you initialize your listOfItems? Are there get/set method in Item class? –  sarwar026 Sep 8 '13 at 12:11
2  
You don't ever set name to anything else. Is code missing? –  usr Sep 8 '13 at 12:13
    
Where do you set different names to item1 and item2? –  Itay Karo Sep 8 '13 at 12:14
    
Lists do not create copies of reference objects. The mistake is somewhere else in your code. –  Rotem Sep 8 '13 at 12:55
1  
"but nothing with the list or the existence of currentConfig itself" this is most likely untrue. You just don't see it. The code as shown is correct and the repro answers prove it. The mistake is elsewhere. Nothing mysterious is going on here, there is just a bug somewhere. List does not clone and c# has reference semantics. Simplify your code by commenting out stuff until it happens to work. Then you know where the problem is. You can use object.GetHashCode to differentiate between different object instances in the debugger, btw. –  usr Sep 8 '13 at 14:17

2 Answers 2

I can't replicate your problem...

If I run the below it demonstrates that the items are A and B as expected

using System.Collections.Generic;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace ClassLibrary1
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class Stack1
    {
        [Test]
        public void TestConfigItems()
        {
            var currentConfig = new Config();

            currentConfig.item1.name = "A";
            currentConfig.item2.name = "B";

            for (int i = 0; i < currentConfig.listOfItems.Count; i++)
            {
                Assert.AreNotEqual("Not Set", currentConfig.listOfItems[i].name);
                Assert.AreEqual(i == 0 ? "A" : "B", currentConfig.listOfItems[i].name);
            }
        }

        public class Config
        {
            public List<Item> listOfItems = new List<Item>();
            public Item item1 = new Item();
            public Item item2 = new Item();

            public Config()
            {
                listOfItems.Add(item1);
                listOfItems.Add(item2);
            }
        }

        public class Item
        { 
            public string name;

            public Item()
            { 
                name = "Not Set";
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I re-wrote your code and I didn't see what you saw. Everything is ok and name property changed correctly. This is what I've done:

internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var currentConfig = new Config();
        currentConfig.item1.name = "A";
        currentConfig.item2.name = "B";

        for (var i = 0; i < currentConfig.listOfItems.Count; i++)
            Console.WriteLine(currentConfig.listOfItems[i].name);
    }
}

public class Config
{
    public Item item1 = new Item();
    public Item item2 = new Item();
    public List<Item> listOfItems = new List<Item>();

    public Config()
    {
        this.listOfItems.Add(this.item1);
        this.listOfItems.Add(this.item2);
    }
}

public class Item
{
    public string name;

    public Item()
    {
        this.name = "Not Set";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you please explain shortly why you used "this" in this.listOfItems.Add(this.item1), and should it make any difference? –  Epikur Sep 8 '13 at 14:43
    
@Epikur 'this' refers to the instance of the class. It isn't necessary to add it but some people prefer to use it for clarity. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dk1507sz.aspx –  Paul D'Ambra Sep 8 '13 at 16:36

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