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I want to create a string from a decimal, whithout the decimal separator;

1,500.00 should become "150000".

What is the proper format for this? (Whithout string.replace , and .)

Thank you!

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1  
This is a weird request; why are you doing this? –  Jason Dec 8 '09 at 17:40
    
A payment provider requires the amounts to be formatted in cents. So it is not allowed to have a seperator. –  joop Dec 8 '09 at 17:56
4  
If you need it formatted in cents, then just multiply by 100 and be done with it. The way your question is worded, it sounds way more general than it needs to be - e.g. it's obvious from what you've said that 1,500.001 should be output as 150000, but your question requires it to be 1500001. –  Pavel Minaev Dec 8 '09 at 17:59
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4 Answers

try:

   decimal d = 1500m;
   string s = (100*d).ToString("0");
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What if there are more decimals after the decimal place? –  Jason Dec 8 '09 at 17:09
    
They won't appear because of the 0 format option. –  Meta-Knight Dec 8 '09 at 17:10
1  
Do you want the extra decimal values ? –  Charles Bretana Dec 8 '09 at 17:14
1  
@Jason, I have strong legs... and didn't you see the way he misspelled "seperator"? That's a clear indication he only wants 2 decimal places... actually, if it matters to you, I got this assumption only from his example - which had two decimal places... but I'm not saying you're wrong... ...only @joop knows. –  Charles Bretana Dec 8 '09 at 19:29
1  
@Charles Bretana: You made me laugh. –  Jason Dec 8 '09 at 19:31
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Two solutions:

  • Create your own NumberFormatInfo and CultureInfo and pass it along to ToString.
  • Multiply the number by 100, then use .ToString("0")
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1  
I don't think the NumberFormatInfo thing will work. .NET does not allow an empty decimal separator. –  Scott P Dec 8 '09 at 17:32
    
Scott P is right; NumberFormatInfo.NumberDecimalSeparator = String.Empty will throw. –  Jason Dec 8 '09 at 17:39
1  
I suspect it's so because it is used for parsing as well, and it's kinda tricky to find an empty substring when parsing... –  Pavel Minaev Dec 8 '09 at 17:58
    
Hmm... that's disappointing. I think Pavel is right, it must be due to the need to round-trip the result with Parse(). –  richardtallent Dec 8 '09 at 20:08
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What's wrong with String.Replace anyway? It's simple and to the point:

CultureInfo info = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US");

decimal m = 1500.00m;
string s = m.ToString("G", info).Replace(".", String.Empty));
Console.WriteLine(s); // outputs "150000"

m = 1500.0m;
string s = m.ToString("G", info).Replace(".", String.Empty));
Console.WriteLine(s); // outputs "15000"

m = 1500.000m;
string s = m.ToString("G", info).Replace(".", String.Empty));
Console.WriteLine(s); // outputs "1500000"


m = 1500.001m;
string s = m.ToString("G", info).Replace(".", String.Empty));
Console.WriteLine(s); // outputs "1500001"

m = 1500.00000000000000000000001m;
string s = m.ToString("G", info).Replace(".", String.Empty));
Console.WriteLine(s); // outputs "150000000000000000000000001"
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1  
"." should be info.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator? –  Rubens Farias Dec 8 '09 at 18:11
    
Eh, it could be but we know that NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator is . when info is the culture represented by en-US. –  Jason Dec 8 '09 at 18:51
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decimal value = 1500;
Console.WriteLine((value * 100).ToString("0"));
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That will return 1500.00 not 150000... –  joop Dec 8 '09 at 17:06
    
@joop: 1500 * 100 = 150000.... –  Meta-Knight Dec 8 '09 at 17:09
    
What if there are more decimals after the decimal place? –  Jason Dec 8 '09 at 17:10
    
It wasn't like that before answer changed, it is correct now thank you for the help! –  joop Dec 8 '09 at 17:10
    
sorry, missed that * 100 in first version; funny thing is one downvote here =) –  Rubens Farias Dec 8 '09 at 17:15
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