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I'm working with tutorial from this site - "Fixed timestep" section.

Here's the code - http://pastebin.com/QaHgcLaR

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
public class GameLoopTest extends JFrame implements ActionListener
{
   private GamePanel gamePanel = new GamePanel();
   private JButton startButton = new JButton("Start");
   private JButton quitButton = new JButton("Quit");
   private JButton pauseButton = new JButton("Pause");
   private boolean running = false;
   private boolean paused = false;
   private int fps = 60;
   private int frameCount = 0;
   public GameLoopTest()
   {
      super("Fixed Timestep Game Loop Test");
      Container cp = getContentPane();
      cp.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
      JPanel p = new JPanel();
      p.setLayout(new GridLayout(1,2));
      p.add(startButton);
      p.add(pauseButton);
      p.add(quitButton);
      cp.add(gamePanel, BorderLayout.CENTER);
      cp.add(p, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
      setSize(500, 500);
      startButton.addActionListener(this);
      quitButton.addActionListener(this);
      pauseButton.addActionListener(this);
   }
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
      GameLoopTest glt = new GameLoopTest();
      glt.setVisible(true);
   }
   public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
   {
      Object s = e.getSource();
      if (s == startButton)
      {
         running = !running;
         if (running)
         {
            startButton.setText("Stop");
            runGameLoop();
         }
         else
         {
            startButton.setText("Start");
         }
      }
      else if (s == pauseButton)
      {
        paused = !paused;
         if (paused)
         {
            pauseButton.setText("Unpause");
         }
         else
         {
            pauseButton.setText("Pause");
         }
      }
      else if (s == quitButton)
      {
         System.exit(0);
      }
   }
   //Starts a new thread and runs the game loop in it.
   public void runGameLoop()
   {
      Thread loop = new Thread()
      {
         public void run()
         {
            gameLoop();
         }
      };
      loop.start();
   }
   //Only run this in another Thread!
   private void gameLoop()
   {
      //This value would probably be stored elsewhere.
      final double GAME_HERTZ = 30.0;
      //Calculate how many ns each frame should take for our target game hertz.
      final double TIME_BETWEEN_UPDATES = 1000000000 / GAME_HERTZ;
      //At the very most we will update the game this many times before a new render.
      //If you're worried about visual hitches more than perfect timing, set this to 1.
      final int MAX_UPDATES_BEFORE_RENDER = 5;
      //We will need the last update time.
      double lastUpdateTime = System.nanoTime();
      //Store the last time we rendered.
      double lastRenderTime = System.nanoTime();
      //If we are able to get as high as this FPS, don't render again.
      final double TARGET_FPS = 60;
      final double TARGET_TIME_BETWEEN_RENDERS = 1000000000 / TARGET_FPS;
      //Simple way of finding FPS.
      int lastSecondTime = (int) (lastUpdateTime / 1000000000);
      while (running)
      {
         double now = System.nanoTime();
         int updateCount = 0;
         if (!paused)
         {
             //Do as many game updates as we need to, potentially playing catchup.
            while( now - lastUpdateTime > TIME_BETWEEN_UPDATES && updateCount < MAX_UPDATES_BEFORE_RENDER )
            {
               updateGame();
               lastUpdateTime += TIME_BETWEEN_UPDATES;
               updateCount++;
            }
            //If for some reason an update takes forever, we don't want to do an insane number of catchups.
            //If you were doing some sort of game that needed to keep EXACT time, you would get rid of this.
            if ( now - lastUpdateTime > TIME_BETWEEN_UPDATES)
            {
               lastUpdateTime = now - TIME_BETWEEN_UPDATES;
            }
            //Render. To do so, we need to calculate interpolation for a smooth render.
            float interpolation = Math.min(1.0f, (float) ((now - lastUpdateTime) / TIME_BETWEEN_UPDATES) );
            drawGame(interpolation);
            lastRenderTime = now;
            //Update the frames we got.
            int thisSecond = (int) (lastUpdateTime / 1000000000);
            if (thisSecond > lastSecondTime)
            {
               System.out.println("NEW SECOND " + thisSecond + " " + frameCount);
               fps = frameCount;
               frameCount = 0;
               lastSecondTime = thisSecond;
            }
            //Yield until it has been at least the target time between renders. This saves the CPU from hogging.
            while ( now - lastRenderTime < TARGET_TIME_BETWEEN_RENDERS && now - lastUpdateTime < TIME_BETWEEN_UPDATES)
            {
               Thread.yield();
               //This stops the app from consuming all your CPU. It makes this slightly less accurate, but is worth it.
               //You can remove this line and it will still work (better), your CPU just climbs on certain OSes.
               //FYI on some OS's this can cause pretty bad stuttering. Scroll down and have a look at different peoples' solutions to this.
               try {Thread.sleep(1);} catch(Exception e) {}
               now = System.nanoTime();
            }
         }
      }
   }
   private void updateGame()
   {
      gamePanel.update();
   }
   private void drawGame(float interpolation)
   {
      gamePanel.setInterpolation(interpolation);
      gamePanel.repaint();
   }
   private class GamePanel extends JPanel
   {
      float interpolation;
      float ballX, ballY, lastBallX, lastBallY;
      int ballWidth, ballHeight;
      float ballXVel, ballYVel;
      float ballSpeed;
      int lastDrawX, lastDrawY;
      public GamePanel()
      {
         ballX = lastBallX = 100;
         ballY = lastBallY = 100;
         ballWidth = 25;
         ballHeight = 25;
         ballSpeed = 25;
         ballXVel = (float) Math.random() * ballSpeed*2 - ballSpeed;
         ballYVel = (float) Math.random() * ballSpeed*2 - ballSpeed;
      }
      public void setInterpolation(float interp)
      {
         interpolation = interp;
      }
      public void update()
      {
         lastBallX = ballX;
         lastBallY = ballY;
         ballX += ballXVel;
         ballY += ballYVel;
         if (ballX + ballWidth/2 >= getWidth())
         {
            ballXVel *= -1;
            ballX = getWidth() - ballWidth/2;
            ballYVel = (float) Math.random() * ballSpeed*2 - ballSpeed;
         }
         else if (ballX - ballWidth/2 <= 0)
         {
            ballXVel *= -1;
            ballX = ballWidth/2;
         }
         if (ballY + ballHeight/2 >= getHeight())
         {
            ballYVel *= -1;
            ballY = getHeight() - ballHeight/2;
            ballXVel = (float) Math.random() * ballSpeed*2 - ballSpeed;
         }
         else if (ballY - ballHeight/2 <= 0)
         {
            ballYVel *= -1;
            ballY = ballHeight/2;
         }
      }
      public void paintComponent(Graphics g)
      {
         //BS way of clearing out the old rectangle to save CPU.
         g.setColor(getBackground());
         g.fillRect(lastDrawX-1, lastDrawY-1, ballWidth+2, ballHeight+2);
         g.fillRect(5, 0, 75, 30);
         g.setColor(Color.RED);
         int drawX = (int) ((ballX - lastBallX) * interpolation + lastBallX - ballWidth/2);
         int drawY = (int) ((ballY - lastBallY) * interpolation + lastBallY - ballHeight/2);
         g.fillOval(drawX, drawY, ballWidth, ballHeight);
         lastDrawX = drawX;
         lastDrawY = drawY;
         g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
         g.drawString("FPS: " + fps, 5, 10);
         frameCount++;
      }
   }
   private class Ball
   {
      float x, y, lastX, lastY;
      int width, height;
      float xVelocity, yVelocity;
      float speed;
      public Ball()
      {
         width = (int) (Math.random() * 50 + 10);
         height = (int) (Math.random() * 50 + 10);
         x = (float) (Math.random() * (gamePanel.getWidth() - width) + width/2);
         y = (float) (Math.random() * (gamePanel.getHeight() - height) + height/2);
         lastX = x;
         lastY = y;
         xVelocity = (float) Math.random() * speed*2 - speed;
         yVelocity = (float) Math.random() * speed*2 - speed;
      }
      public void update()
      {
         lastX = x;
         lastY = y;
         x += xVelocity;
         y += yVelocity;
         if (x + width/2 >= gamePanel.getWidth())
         {
            xVelocity *= -1;
            x = gamePanel.getWidth() - width/2;
            yVelocity = (float) Math.random() * speed*2 - speed;
         }
         else if (x - width/2 <= 0)
         {
            xVelocity *= -1;
            x = width/2;
         }
         if (y + height/2 >= gamePanel.getHeight())
         {
            yVelocity *= -1;
            y = gamePanel.getHeight() - height/2;
            xVelocity = (float) Math.random() * speed*2 - speed;
         }
         else if (y - height/2 <= 0)
         {
            yVelocity *= -1;
            y = height/2;
         }
      }
      public void draw(Graphics g)
      {
      }
   }
}

After run this code, the ball has kind of lag, but there is still 60 FPS. After I move mouse over application's window and move it in random directions, the ball is moving smoothly. It happens even if window application isn't focused! What's wrong? Can it be fixed?

I'm using Ubuntu 13.04 with Oracle JDK7. I've found that it happens with every application. Similar things happens even in LWJGL application, but effect of the "lag" is much less than in swing application.

17 sec video showing my problem

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8SBjKncgRw

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EDIT : @johnchen902 already edited the code , so my below comment is obsolete. ----- Add a small part of RELATED CODE , ( and error logs if any) in the post . code in link is not the best of options to read –  Srinath Ganesh Sep 8 '13 at 13:30
    
It's not related only to that application, so this is no necessary. –  Vare Zon Sep 8 '13 at 13:32
    
I'd say that the scheduler assigns higher priority to an "active" window, and it uses mouse position among other things. But that's kind of a blind shot. –  Maciej Stachowski Sep 8 '13 at 13:36
    
I cannot reproduce. However, you should call super.paintComponent(g) in GamePanel.paintComponent(). –  johnchen902 Sep 8 '13 at 13:39
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The repaints should be triggered from a Swing based Timer, which ensures that GUI updates are called on the EDT. See Concurrency in Swing for more details.

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I don't think so this is the main problem. Similar things happens even in LWJGL application, but effect of the "lag" is much less than in swing application. It must be system related. –  Vare Zon Sep 8 '13 at 13:46
2  
"I don't think so this is the main problem." Prove me wrong in code (that implements the suggestion). –  Andrew Thompson Sep 8 '13 at 14:04
1  
@VareZon: You might start wit this example. –  trashgod Sep 8 '13 at 14:11
    
@AndrewThompson I've tried with example code from trashgod and the lag effect still exists but much less. I still don't know why mouse cursor solves this problem, even with not fucused window. –  Vare Zon Sep 8 '13 at 14:29
2  
It is not about better ways to write this application. Violating the Swing threading rules will always lead to (subtle) bugs, and are a PITA to track down (as all threading bugs) as they are hard/impossible to reproduce –  Robin Sep 8 '13 at 16:46
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had same problem under kubuntu 13.04

I goggled sth. which workes for me:

http://www.java-gaming.org/index.php?topic=19224.0

Basic idea is to put

Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().sync();

after drawing something. In your code it should be after

drawGame(interpolation);

The explanation seems to be that the window system manages the update intervals, so it is not Java's fault and only occures with some window mangers.

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This appears to be a bug in the VM since Java 6. I had the same problem and found an ugly, but simple workaround: Create a Robot object and let it press a key or position the mouse in each cycle. The animation will then run smoothly. Example:

final Robot robot = new Robot();
javax.swing.Timer timer = new javax.swing.Timer(initialDelay, new ActionListener()
{
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
    {
        // update your image...

        robot.keyPress(62);
     }
});

See also: Java animation stutters when not moving mouse cursor

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