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Issue: Instead of updating nested attributes, they are being created on top of the existing nested attributes when I hit the #update action of the associated features_controller.rb

Likely Cause: I think the problem lies in my lack of understanding in Rails' form_for. I think the breakdown is in my views, how I render the persisting nested attributes, and/or how I fail to specify the nested attribute's id, causing it to simply create a new one

feature.rb

class Feature < ActiveRecord::Base
  ...
  has_many :scenarios
  accepts_nested_attributes_for :scenarios,
    allow_destroy: true,
    reject_if: :all_blank
  ...
end

features_controller.rb

def update
  ...
  project = Project.find(params[:project_id])
  @feature = Feature.find(params[:id])

  if @feature.update_attributes(feature_params)
    # checking feature_params looks good...
    # feature_params['scenarios'] => { <correct object hash> }

    redirect_to project
  else
    render :edit
  end
end

...

private
def feature_params
  params.require(:feature).permit(:title, :narrative, :price, :eta, scenarios_attributes[:description, :_destroy])
end

_form.html.haml (simplified)

= form_for [@project, @feature] do |f|
  ...
  - if @feature.new_record? -# if we are creating new feature
    = f.fields_for :scenarios, @feature.scenarios.build do |builder|
      = builder.label :description, "Scenario"
      = builder.text_area :description, rows: "3", autocomplete: "off"

  - else -# if we are editing an existing feature
    = f.fields_for :scenarios do |builder|
      = builder.label :description, "Scenario"
      = builder.text_area :description, rows: "3", autocomplete: "off"

I'm sure there's a nicer way to achieve the if @feature.new_record? check. I'm also using a few Javascript hooks to create dynamic nested attribute forms (which I've left out), heavily influenced by Railscast #196 Nested Model Form (revised)

I would love a really nice Rails-y implementation of dealing with these sorts of nested forms.

share|improve this question
2  
Would adding :id to the :scenario_attributes portion of your feature_params method fix it? You only have the description field and the ability to allow a destroy. – jason328 Sep 8 '13 at 19:21
    
yes, that's exactly it! – pruett Sep 9 '13 at 15:21
up vote 29 down vote accepted

Try adding :id to the :scenario_attributes portion of your feature_params method. You only have the description field and the ability to allow a destroy.

def feature_params
  # added => before nested attributes
  params.require(:feature).permit(:id, :title, :narrative, :price, :eta, scenarios_attributes => [:id, :description, :_destroy])
end

As @vinodadhikary suggested, you no longer need to check if feature is a new record, since Rails, specifically using the form_for method, will do that for you.

Update:

You don't need to define if @feature.new_record? ... else in your form. It will be taken care by Rails when you use form_for. Rails checks if the action is going to be create or update based on object.persisted?, so, you can update your form to:

= form_for [@project, @feature] do |f|
  ...
  = f.fields_for :scenarios, @feature.scenarios.build do |builder|
    = builder.label :description, "Scenario"
    = builder.text_area :description, rows: "3", autocomplete: "off"
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh good point. My mistake for missing that. – jason328 Sep 8 '13 at 19:26
1  
I would also suggest updating the form code, checking feature.new_record? is not necessary as form_for handles that itself. – vee Sep 8 '13 at 19:27
1  
thanks guys, this is helpful information, i figured out the need for an :id in the strong parameter definition soon after I wrote this question. thanks also for the additional info on form_for, i'll attempt DRYing up my form :) – pruett Sep 9 '13 at 15:26
3  
Is it safe to allow the user to set the id? – Philip7899 Dec 17 '13 at 23:17
1  
@Philip7899 the id is only used to figure out which nested record must be updated... if none is passed it will try to create a new one – glampr Dec 30 '14 at 17:35

As @Philip7899 mentioned as a comment in the accepted answer, allowing the user to set the id means that they could "steal" children records belonging to another user.

However, Rails accepts_nested_attributes_for actually checks the id and raises:

ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound:
  Couldn't find Answer with ID=5 for Questionnaire with ID=5

Basically the ids are looked for in the children association (again, as said by @glampr). Therefor, the child record belonging to another user is not found.

Ultimately, 401 is the response status (unlike the usual 404 from ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound)

Follows some code I used to test the behaviour.

let :params do
  {
    id: questionnaire.id,
    questionnaire: {
      participation_id: participation.id,
      answers_attributes: answers_attributes
    }
  }
end

let :evil_params do
  params.tap do |params|
    params[:questionnaire][:answers_attributes]['0']['id'] = another_participant_s_answer.id.to_s
  end
end

it "doesn't mess with other people's answers" do
  old_value = another_participant_s_answer.value

  put :update, evil_params

  expect(another_participant_s_answer.reload.value).to eq(old_value) # pass
  expect(response.status).to eq(401) # pass
end

In conclusion, adding the id to the permitted params as stated above is correct and safe.

Fascinating Rails.

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