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I wanted to know what would be the fastest approach of comparing floats to three decimal places.Say I have something like this

float lhs = 2.567xxxx
float rhs = 2.566xxxx

The above should be different and if its something like this

float lhs = 2.566xxxx
float rhs = 2.566xxxx

They should be the same

Update:

I am trying the following

double trunc(double d)
{
    return (d>0) ? floor(d) : ceil(d) ; 
}


bool comparedigits(float a , float b)
{
    if (trunc(1000.0 * a) == trunc(1000.0 * b))
    {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

    float g = 2.346;
    float h= 2.34599;
    bool t = comparedigits(g,h) ; //Not the same and should return false;

However it is returning true.

share|improve this question
3  
Do you understand that when you think you may have exactly 2.567, you may actually have 2.56699999...? – hvd Sep 8 '13 at 16:58
6  
    
Sorry fixed it - 3 decimal places – MistyD Sep 8 '13 at 17:01
3  
Do you really want to report as different values that are only very slightly apart just because they differ in the first few digits, such as 2.566999999999999999999999 and 2.567000000000000000, even though values that are farther apart, such as 2.566 and 2.256699, are reported as the same? – Eric Postpischil Sep 8 '13 at 17:19
    
@MistyD About the values in your question, g is not exactly 2.346. 2.346 is not exactly representable, so g is really 2.345999..., and returning true is correct. – hvd Sep 8 '13 at 20:23
up vote 7 down vote accepted

To put a stop to the onslaught of answers that are wrong because they allow rounding to alter the results, here is an answer that does not have the rounding problem, because it uses double for the arithmetic:

trunc(1000. * lhs) == trunc(1000. * rhs);

This works because 1000. has type double, so the other operand is converted from float to double, and the multiplication is performed in the double format. The product of 1000 with any float value is exactly representable in double, so there is no rounding error (assuming IEEE 754 32-bit and 64-bit binary floating-point). Then we use trunc to compare the numbers up to the (original) third digit after the decimal point.

I hesitated to provide this answer because I am not sure it is what the OP really wants. Often when people come to Stack Overflow with a request for comparing “to three decimal places”, they have not entirely thought through the problem. A complete correct answer may have to wait until we have clarification.

Also, the above is for positive numbers only. If the values may be negative, then a prior test should be performed on their signs, and false should be returned if they differ. (Otherwise, –.0009 would be reported as equal to +.0009.)

share|improve this answer
1  
Not my downvote (I don't downvote), but doesn't your solution have the same problem for a float with a large enough integer part? – jxh Sep 8 '13 at 18:11
1  
@jxh: No. The float significand is 24 bits. 1000 is 10 bits. Their product has at most 34 significant bits. The double significand is 53 bits. There is plenty of room. And the double range is much larger than the float range, so there is never any overflow. trunc returns its result in double, not int. – Eric Postpischil Sep 8 '13 at 18:13
    
I see, thanks. +1. – jxh Sep 8 '13 at 18:19
    
I am getting trunc undefined. And I did include #include <math.h>. I am using VS2010 – MistyD Sep 8 '13 at 18:24
1  
@DietmarKühl I think I agree with the point you're making, but I hope you do agree that what the code in this answer does is exactly what the question asks for. 0.250999987125396728515625 and 0.251100003719329833984375 (0.2510f and 0.2511f) differ in the third decimal, so the question asks to count them as "not close enough", and that's exactly what this answer does. Whether that's something the OP has any use for (possibly not, perhaps even probably not) is for the OP to decide. :) – hvd Sep 8 '13 at 21:37

For float values which can fit into an integer after x1000 you can try:

if (static_cast<int>(lhs*1000.0) == static_cast<int>(rhs*1000.0))
{
   // Values are near
}
else
{
   // They are not identical (maybe!)
}

Be careful of computer accuracy in representing float value.


IMPORTANT UPDATE

Always there're numbers which can fail a code, Eric Postpischil's code fails as same as this code.

Even converting to string doesn't help, we can find numbers which can not convert to strings correctly.

Well, what is the solution? It's easy, we must define scope and needed accuracy of our program. We can not have unlimited precision in computer world. What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 but note that this only works for floating point values that do not exceed the range of int. That may very well be a valid assumption for the OP. – hvd Sep 8 '13 at 17:03
1  
This test states that 3.399999999999999911182158029987476766109466552734375 is “near” 3.4000000000000003552713678800500929355621337890625 (because they both produce 3400 when multiplied by 1000 with IEEE 754 64-bit binary arithmetic and then converted to an int), but the question indicates they should be reported as different since they differ in the first three digits after the decimal place. – Eric Postpischil Sep 8 '13 at 17:15
1  
I incorrectly used double for my example above, but the problem occurs for float too, as with 3.599999904632568359375 and 3.6000001430511474609375. An easy workaround for float is to perform the multiplication with double. Then there will be no rounding error; the product of every float with 1000 is exactly representable in double (using 754 IEEE 32-bit and 64-bit binary). – Eric Postpischil Sep 8 '13 at 17:28
1  
"Even converting to string doesn't help, we can find numbers which can not convert to strings correctly." -- No, every binary floating point value is exactly representable as a decimal value, and can be converted to a suitably long string without any data loss. Remember, if you have a decimal number with a finite number of digits, and divide it by 2, you still have a decimal number with a finite number of digits. – hvd Sep 8 '13 at 20:13
1  
@MM. Yes, a fixed-precision base 2 floating point value can be losslessly converted to a fixed-precision base 10 floating point value (possibly expressed as a string), because 10 is a multiple of 2. However, it may require (and often does require) more decimal places than you might expect. – hvd Sep 8 '13 at 20:52

If we assume that the xxxxs in your statement are true don't cares, that is you only care about 7 decimal places of precision, then the following scheme will work.

To deal with floating point representation effects due to the limited precision of float, you can promote the arguments to double, rounded to the 7th decimal place, and multiply by 1000. Then, you can use modf() to extract the integral part and compare them.

bool equals_by_3_decimal_places (float a, float b) {
    double ai, bi;

    modf((.00000005 + a) * 1000, &ai);
    modf((.00000005 + b) * 1000, &bi);
    return ai == bi;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This incorrectly reports that 1.198999881744384765625 and 1.19900000095367431640625 are equal to three decimal places. – Eric Postpischil Sep 8 '13 at 17:53
    
@EricPostpischil: Okay, looking at the GNU libc implementation, I see that it is actually using a small version of an arbitrary precision library to achieve accurate printing. I can fake this by promoting to double internally in the function. – jxh Sep 8 '13 at 18:07
    
Once you have promoted to double, why bother with iterations and fancy stuff? 1000.*a is an exactly correct result, with no rounding. – Eric Postpischil Sep 8 '13 at 18:11
    
@EricPostpischil: Right, modf() can be an alternative to trunc() after conversion to double. – jxh Sep 8 '13 at 18:39
    
Tried this with float g = 2.346;float h= 2.34599; returns true and should have returned false. Since the third decimal place 5 != 6 – MistyD Sep 8 '13 at 18:56

Convert the float values to strings with the full number of places (std::numeric_limits<float>::dgits10), then truncate the string to 3 decimal places, and compare the resulting strings:

std::string convert(float value, int places) {
    if (value == 0) {
        return "0";
    }
    int digits(std::numeric_limits<float>::digits10 - std::log(value) / std::log(10));
    digits = std::max(0, digits);
    std::ostringstream out;
    out << std::fixed << std::setprecision(digits) << value;
    std::string rc(out.str());
    return places < digits? rc.substr(0, rc.size() - (digits - places)): rc;
}

bool compare(float f1, float f2) {
    return convert(f1, 3) == convert(f2, 3);
}

The various comparisons proposed multiplying by 100 or 1000 don't work because they will do binary rather than decimal rounding. You could try to add 0.5 after multiplying and before truncating to int but there are cases (although few) where this approach still fails. The conversion above, however, does the right thing as long as you don't end up with more than std::numeric_limits<float>::digit10 digits. Trying to deal with more decimal digits than this number will fail because the float can't represent as many decimal digits correctly anyway.

share|improve this answer
2  
How do you know converting a float to a string will not round the real value? – deepmax Sep 8 '13 at 17:07
3  
I don't think this answers the question: testing shows what M M.'s comment hints at: 2.3451 and 2.3459 do not compare as equal to three places. (You forgot the places parameter in the compare function, I added that when testing.) – hvd Sep 8 '13 at 17:12
    
@hvd: I do think the above answer the question (aside from the silly typo of forgetting the places). It certainly works with values you quoted. In which way does it not work in your opinion? – Dietmar Kühl Sep 8 '13 at 17:43
    
@DietmarKühl What does std::cout << std::fixed << std::setprecision(3) << 2.3459 output on your system? I get 2.346, which is not equal to 2.345, so the values do not compare as equal. – hvd Sep 8 '13 at 17:46
    
@MM.: The conversion from float to a string as above will do the correct rounding! That's the whole point of doing this conversion. If the original question indeed intents not to do the rounding the correct approach is to format the value such that digits10 digits are formatted and truncated after three digits. – Dietmar Kühl Sep 8 '13 at 17:49

1) you are trying to do equals comparisons with floating point. Some floating point formats that will work, but IEEE formats will not work. You cannot do equals comparisons. You need to convert that float to an int then do an int compare. With integers (not limiting myself to 32 bit or anything here) there is only one way to represent each number so you can do equals comparisons.

2) remember the floating point math is base 2 and you are asking to do base 10 stuff. so there are going to be conversion issues, truncation. Also I again assume you are using IEEE which means you have three rounding modes (base 2) so you have to deal with that as well. You will want to do some sort of double_to_integer((double*1000.0)+0.5) and compare those. I would not be surprised if you find corner cases that dont work.

More interesting information on this problem. Note that use of unions in this manner is not supported by the C standard, but often just happens to work...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

double trunc(double d)
{
    return (d>0) ? floor(d) : ceil(d) ;
}
int comparedigits(float a , float b)
{
    if (trunc(1000.0 * a) == trunc(1000.0 * b))
    {
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}
union
{
    unsigned int ul;
    float f;
} fun;
union
{
    unsigned int ul[2];
    double d;
} dun;
int main ( void )
{
    float g;
    float h;
    int t;


    g = 2.346;
    h = 2.34599;
    t = comparedigits(g,h);

    printf("%u\n",t);
    printf("raw\n");
    fun.f=g; printf("0x%08X\n",fun.ul);
    fun.f=h; printf("0x%08X\n",fun.ul);
    dun.d=g; printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    dun.d=h; printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    printf("trunc\n");
    dun.d=trunc(1000.0 * g); printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    dun.d=trunc(1000.0 * h); printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    printf("trunc\n");
    dun.d=trunc(1000.0F * g); printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    dun.d=trunc(1000.0F * h); printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    printf("floor\n");
    dun.d=floor(1000.0 * g); printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    dun.d=floor(1000.0 * h); printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    printf("ceil\n");
    dun.d=ceil(1000.0 * g); printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);
    dun.d=ceil(1000.0 * h); printf("0x%08X_%08X\n",dun.ul[1],dun.ul[0]);

    printf("%u\n",(unsigned int)(g*1000.0));
    printf("%u\n",(unsigned int)(h*1000.0));

    if (trunc(1000.0F * g) == trunc(1000.0F * h))
    {
        printf("true\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("false\n");
    }
    return(0);
}

compile and run

gcc test.c -o test -lm
./test 
1
raw
0x401624DD
0x401624B3
0x4002C49B_A0000000
0x4002C496_60000000
trunc
0x40A25200_00000000
0x40A25200_00000000
trunc
0x40A25400_00000000
0x40A25200_00000000
floor
0x40A25200_00000000
0x40A25200_00000000
ceil
0x40A25400_00000000
0x40A25400_00000000
2345
2345
false

So doing the 1000 * x in single math instead of double math appears to fix the problem

1000.0 * a is mixed mode. The 1000.0 is a double by the C standards unless specified to be a single. And a is a single, so a is converted to a double the math is done as double then it is fed to a double function. 1000.0F is a single, a is a single, so the multiply is done as single math, then it is converted to double. So perhaps the real issue is in the conversion and rounding of g and h to a double. Would have to dig more into the mantissa differences...

I think the key is this, the double times single 1000.0 * x results

trunc
0x40A25200_00000000
0x40A25200_00000000

If those are equal then anything you do the same number will come out the same. When it is a single times a single then converted to a double, they differ.

trunc
0x40A25400_00000000
0x40A25200_00000000

and that makes your code work (for those two specific values).

false
share|improve this answer
    
+1 your second paragraph about base of representations clarifies many inaccuracies in conversions. – deepmax Sep 8 '13 at 20:37
1  
Your first paragraph is nonsense from beginning to end. IEEE 754 floating-point equality works just fine, and for any given IEEE 754 binary format each finite floating-point value (apart from +0.0 and -0.0) represents a rational that is not represented by any other other value of the same format. – Pascal Cuoq Sep 8 '13 at 21:51
    
And adding 0.5 to compute the nearest integer with truncation does not work very well: blog.frama-c.com/index.php?post/2013/05/02/nearbyintf1 (in double-precision, the constants are 0.999999999999999889 for the first problematic value and 2^52..2^53 for the range of values that are exactly one apart). – Pascal Cuoq Sep 8 '13 at 21:56

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