Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question builds on this @FredOverflow's question.

CLARIFICATION: initializer_list approach is required as the VC++2012 has a bug the prevents forwarded expansion of namespaced arguments. _MSC_VER <= 1700 has the bug.

I've written a variadic template function that collapses any number of arguments in a typed container. I use the type's constructor to convert the variadic arguments into consumable values. E.g. _variant_t :)

I need this for my MySql C++ library when pushing arguments to prepared statements in one strike, while my MySqlVariant converts the input data to MYSQL_BINDs. As I may work with BLOBs, I'd like to avoid copy-construct as much as possible when I can move&& the large containers around.

I've done a simple test and noticed that the initialize_list does copy-construct for the stored elements and destroys them when it goes out of scope. Perfect... Then I tried to move the data out of the initializer_list and, to my surprise, it used lvalues not rvalues as I expected with std::move.

Funny as this happens just after Going Native 2013 clearly warned me that move does not move, forward does not forward... be like water, my friend - to stay on the deep end of thinking.

But that did not stop me :) I decided to const_cast the initializer_list values and still move them out. An eviction order needs to be enforced. And this is my implementation:

template <typename Output_t, typename ...Input_t>
inline Output_t& Compact(Output_t& aOutput, Input_t&& ...aInput){
    // should I do this? makes sense...
    if(!sizeof...(aInput)){
        return aOutput;
    }

    // I like typedefs as they shorten the code :)
    typedef Output_t::value_type Type_t;

    // can be either lvalues or rvalues in the initializer_list when it's populated.
    std::initializer_list<Type_t> vInput = { std::forward<Input_t>(aInput)... };

    // now move the initializer_list into the vector.
    aOutput.reserve(aOutput.size() + vInput.size());
    for(auto vIter(vInput.begin()), vEnd(vInput.end()); vIter != vEnd; ++vIter){
        // move (don't copy) out the lvalue or rvalue out of the initializer_list.
        // aOutput.emplace_back(std::move(const_cast<Type_t&>(*vIter))); // <- BAD!
        // the answer points out that the above is undefined so, use the below
        aOutput.emplace_back(*vIter); // <- THIS is STANDARD LEGAL (copy ctor)!
    }

    // done! :)
    return aOutput;
}

Using it is easy:

// You need to pre-declare the container as you could use a vector or a list...
// as long as .emplace_back is on duty!
std::vector<MySqlVariant> vParams;
Compact(vParams, 1, 1.5, 1.6F, "string", L"wstring",
    std::move(aBlob), aSystemTime); // MySql params :)

I've also uploaded a full test on IDEone ^ that shows as the memory of a std::string moves properly with this function. (I would paste it all here but it's slightly long...)

As long as the _variant_t (or whatever final wrapping object) has the right constructors, it's great. And if the data can be moved out, it's even better. And it pretty much works as I tested it and things std::move in the right direction :)

My questions are simple:

  • Am I doing this right standard-wise?
  • Is the fact that it's working right intended or just a side effect?
  • If std::move does not work by default on initializer_list, is what I'm doing here: illegal, immoral, hacky... or just plain wrong?

PS: I'm a self-taught Windows Native C++ developer, ignorant of the standards.
^ my excuse if I'm doing really non-standard things here.

UPDATE

Thanks everyone, I have both the answer and the solution (a short and long one) now.

And I love the C++11 side of SO. Many knowledgeable people here...

share|improve this question
3  
Can't you just do aOutput.emplace_back(std::forward<Input_T>(aInput))...; and avoid putting the things in the initializer_list at all? –  Billy ONeal Sep 8 '13 at 18:23
    
@BillyONeal I'll try! –  CodeAngry Sep 8 '13 at 18:25
1  
Why don't you use array Type_t vInput[] = ... instead of initializer_list? –  catscradle Sep 8 '13 at 18:25
2  
@BillyONeal I don't this would work directly, as the pack expansion is illegal in this context IIRC, see [temp.variadic]/4. You could however insert it in a valid context. –  dyp Sep 8 '13 at 18:28
2  
@FredOverflow It is at the right place, but in an illegal context for a pack expansion. Live example –  dyp Sep 8 '13 at 18:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the general case, this is undefined behavior, unfortunately. At §8.5.4/5, emphasis mine:

An object of type std::initializer_list<E> is constructed from an initializer list as if the implementation allocated a temporary array of N elements of type const E, where N is the number of elements in the initializer list. Each element of that array is copy-initialized with the corresponding element of the initializer list, and the std::initializer_list<E> object is constructed to refer to that array.

Where you see a std::initializer_list<E>, you can act as if it's a const E[N].

So when you const_cast away the const, you're looking at a mutable reference to a const object. Any modification to a const object is undefined behavior.

When you move that std::string, you're modifying a const object. Unfortunately , one of the behaviors of undefined behavior is seemingly correct behavior. But this is technically undefined.

Note that when you std::move(int) into another, that is well-defined because int 's can only be copied, so the move does nothing and no const objects are modified. But in general, it's undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any clear reason for this? As the initialize_list is designed to be a temporary thing, why can't I take it's belongings?... Is there any scenario where this would crash? (my VC++2012 CTPnov2012 likes it). –  CodeAngry Sep 8 '13 at 18:35
3  
@CodeAngry: It's unimportant whether your compiler likes it. The standard says it invokes undefined behaviour. It might for example crash if the const-object was placed into read-only memory. –  Xeo Sep 8 '13 at 18:40
    
@Xeo OK! That's a good reason. I knew bypassing the standard would get me into trouble. So... it's back to two implementations. Move one with specialized MySql Variant Param collection and this one for lighter data... I won't mix copy-construct with blobs. –  CodeAngry Sep 8 '13 at 18:44
    
@CodeAngry: I cannot comment on the reasoning for making the elements const, sorry. –  GManNickG Sep 8 '13 at 18:45
2  
@Yakk Just in the next paragraph: "The array has the same lifetime as any other temporary object, except that initializing an initializer_list object from the array extends the lifetime of the array exactly like binding a reference to a temporary." –  dyp Sep 8 '13 at 18:56

You can reduce the specializations by one. This "universal reference" specialization should also cover the lvalue reference, in which case std::move will do nothing.

template <typename Output_t, typename First_t>
inline Output_t& Compact(Output_t& aOutput, First_t&& aFirst){
    aOutput.emplace_back(std::forward<First_t>(aFirst));
    return aOutput;
}

Source: Scott Meyers talk at GoingNative2013; finely detailed in this accu article

share|improve this answer
1  
std::move is the wrong tool for universal references, std::forward<First_t> is the correct one. –  Xeo Sep 9 '13 at 7:29
    
+1. I have modified that in my code #if _MSC_VER > 1700. It will work perfectly in VS2013 as right now the bug I mentioned can only be circumvented by an intermediary initializer_list for _MSV_VER <= 1700 :) So I got what I needed working with two versions, fast one that does not work right now... and slower one that'll have to do for the moment. –  CodeAngry Sep 9 '13 at 12:06
    
@SentiBachcha The linked PDF was a very good and detailed read. –  CodeAngry Sep 9 '13 at 13:49

Found an alternative solution, for anyone sharing my pain:

#if _MCS_VER <= 1700
// Use the code in the OP!
// VS 2012- stuff comes here.
#else
// VS 2013+ stuff comes here.
template <typename Output_t>
inline Output_t& Compact(Output_t& aOutput){
    return aOutput;
}

template <typename Output_t, typename First_t>
inline Output_t& Compact(Output_t& aOutput, const First_t& aFirst){
    aOutput.emplace_back(aFirst);
    return aOutput;
}

template <typename Output_t, typename First_t>
inline Output_t& Compact(Output_t& aOutput, First_t&& aFirst){
    aOutput.emplace_back(std::move(aFirst));
    return aOutput;
}

template <typename Output_t, typename First_t, typename ...Next_t>
inline Output_t& Compact(Output_t& aOutput, const First_t& aFirst, Next_t&& ...aNext){
    aOutput.emplace_back(aFirst);
    return Compact(aOutput, std::forward<Next_t>(aNext)...);
}

template <typename Output_t, typename First_t, typename ...Next_t>
inline Output_t& Compact(Output_t& aOutput, First_t&& aFirst, Next_t&& ...aNext){
    aOutput.emplace_back(std::move(aFirst));
    return Compact(aOutput, std::forward<Next_t>(aNext)...);
}
#endif // _MCS_VER <= 1700

PS: VC++2012 CTPnov2012 has a BUG that prevents this from working on namespaced classes. So, the initial solution without the const_casthas to do. All my code is namespaced. VC2013 has this fixed in theory... so will switch the code when I upgrade.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you take a look at catscradle's/my example? (Does it work on VS2012 Nov CTP?) –  dyp Sep 8 '13 at 19:07
    
@DyP Just tried it and it works. If you have a move&& arg declared and do a std::move() on it in the function body but send a const ref& as argument... will it attempt to const_cast before trying to move or just fall back to a copy construct? (so I don't go testing it now) –  CodeAngry Sep 8 '13 at 19:14
2  
@DyP Sorry, I posted wrong link earlier, with both old functions. I wanted to do it like this. –  catscradle Sep 8 '13 at 19:14
    
@DyP It works. Now a stupid question: why doesn't it work without the wrapping? –  CodeAngry Sep 8 '13 at 19:16
1  
@CodeAngry What wrapping? The reason why c.emplace_back(args)...; doesn't "work" is because it's forbidden by the Standard. The pack expansion (expanding the parameter pack args via the ...) is only allowed to appear in certain contexts, probably to clarify the meaning of it. In the context c.emplace_back(args)...;, it could be resolved to c.emplace_back(arg0), c.emplace_back(arg1), /*etc.*/; but this could lead to side-effects if , is overloaded. Maybe there's another rationale why it isn't allowed here. See this answer –  dyp Sep 8 '13 at 19:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.