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Run the following code from a directory that contains a directory named bar (containing one or more files) and a directory named baz (also containing one or more files). Make sure there is not a directory named foo.

import shutil
shutil.copytree('bar', 'foo')
shutil.copytree('baz', 'foo')

It will fail with:

$ python copytree_test.py 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "copytree_test.py", line 5, in <module>
    shutil.copytree('baz', 'foo')
  File "/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.5/lib/python2.5/shutil.py", line 110, in copytree
  File "/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.5/lib/python2.5/os.py", line 172, in makedirs
OSError: [Errno 17] File exists: 'foo'

I want this to work the same way as if I had typed:

$ mkdir foo
$ cp bar/* foo/
$ cp baz/* foo/

Do I need to use shutil.copy() to copy each file in baz into foo? (After I've already copied the contents of 'bar' into 'foo' with shutil.copytree()?) Or is there an easier/better way?

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FYI: here is the original copytree function, just copy and patch it :) –  schlamar Nov 17 '12 at 18:40
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5 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

This question was asked long ago, but I decided to post my workaround anyway because this limitation of the standard shutil.copytree seems arbitrary and annoying.

def copytree(src, dst, symlinks=False, ignore=None):
    for item in os.listdir(src):
        s = os.path.join(src, item)
        d = os.path.join(dst, item)
        if os.path.isdir(s):
            shutil.copytree(s, d, symlinks, ignore)
        else:
            shutil.copy2(s, d)

Note that it's not entirely consistent with the standard copytree:

  • it doesn't honor symlinks and ignore parameters for the root directory of the src tree;
  • it doesn't raise shutil.Error for errors at the root level of src;
  • in case of errors during copying of a subtree, it will raise shutil.Error for that subtree instead of trying to copy other subtrees and raising single combined shutil.Error.
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4  
Thanks! Agree that this seems totally arbitrary! shutil.copytree does an os.makedirs(dst) at the start. No part of the code actually would have a problem with a pre-existing dir. This needs to be changed. At least provide an exist_ok=False parameter to the call –  cfi Sep 26 '12 at 16:05
    
this gives me an errno[13] permission denied error, any suggestions? –  Drewdin Feb 13 '13 at 18:14
    
@Drewdin - um, did you check permissions for the filesystem path from the exception? –  atzz Feb 14 '13 at 10:54
    
I did, I actually found that i had a mistake in my code. i had my d in the copytree set to dst. It didn't like it. Thanks for the help! +1 –  Drewdin Feb 14 '13 at 15:34
2  
This is a good answer - however Mital Vora's answer below is worth looking at also. They have called copytree recursively rather than calling shutil.copytree() because the same problem will arise otherwise. Possibly consider merging answers or updating to Mital Vora's. –  PJeffes Oct 17 '13 at 15:19
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docs explicitly state that destination directory should not exist:

The destination directory, named by dst, must not already exist; it will be created as well as missing parent directories.

I think your best bet is to os.walk the second and all consequent directories, copy2 directory and files and do additional copystat for directories. After all that's precisely what copytree does as explained in the docs. Or you could copy and copystat each directory/file and os.listdir instead of os.walk.

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i would assume fastest and simplest way would be have python call the system commands...

example..

import os
cmd = '<command line call>'
os.system(cmd)

Tar and gzip up the directory.... unzip and untar the directory in the desired place.

yah?

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if you are running in windows... download 7zip.. and use command line for that. ... again just suggestions. –  Kirby Dec 8 '09 at 18:01
12  
System commands should always be a last resort. It's always better to utilize the standard library whenever possible so that your code is portable. –  jathanism Dec 8 '09 at 18:06
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In slight improvement on atzz's answer to the function where the above function always tries to copy the files from source to destination.

def copytree(src, dst, symlinks=False, ignore=None):
    if not os.path.exists(dst):
        os.makedirs(dst)
    for item in os.listdir(src):
        s = os.path.join(src, item)
        d = os.path.join(dst, item)
        if os.path.isdir(s):
            copytree(s, d, symlinks, ignore)
        else:
            if not os.path.exists(d) or os.stat(src).st_mtime - os.stat(dst).st_mtime > 1:
                shutil.copy2(s, d)

In my above implementation

  • Creating the output directory if not already exists Doing the copy
  • directory by recursively calling my own method. When we come to
  • actually copying the file I check if the file is modified then only we should copy.

I am using above function along with scons build. It helped me a lot as every time when I compile I may not need to copy entire set of files.. but only the files which are modified.

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2  
Nice, except that you have symlinks and ignore as arguments, but they are ignored. –  Matthew Alpert Oct 31 '13 at 18:48
    
It is worth noting that st_mtime granularity can be as coarse as 2 seconds on FAT filesystems docs.python.org/2/library/os.html. Using this code in a context where updates happen in rapid succession, you may find overrides don't take place. –  dghubble Mar 10 at 6:34
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A merge one inspired by atzz and Mital Vora:

#!/usr/bin/python
import os
import shutil
import stat
def copytree(src, dst, symlinks = False, ignore = None):
  if not os.path.exists(dst):
    os.makedirs(dst)
    shutil.copystat(src, dst)
  lst = os.listdir(src)
  if ignore:
    excl = ignore(src, lst)
    lst = [x for x in lst if x not in excl]
  for item in lst:
    s = os.path.join(src, item)
    d = os.path.join(dst, item)
    if symlinks and os.path.islink(s):
      if os.path.lexists(d):
        os.remove(d)
      os.symlink(os.readlink(s), d)
      try:
        st = os.lstat(s)
        mode = stat.S_IMODE(st.st_mode)
        os.lchmod(d, mode)
      except:
        pass # lchmod not available
    elif os.path.isdir(s):
      copytree(s, d, symlinks, ignore)
    else:
      shutil.copy2(s, d)
  • Same behavior as shutil.copytree, with symlinks and ignore parameters
  • Create directory destination structure if non existant
  • Will not fail if dst already exists
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