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I have a project with spring and maven. I found that using profiles, maven could change the properties of the data source. But what if in production the datasource is with a lookup like this, how to do the profiles for this: one with a basic datasource and the other a jee lookup.

 <jee:jndi-lookup id="dataSourcejndi" jndi-name="jdbc/BGGDS"
      default-value="null" resource-ref="true"/>

This is how the profiles are in the pom.xml

<profiles>
         <profile>
            <id>local</id>
            <activation>
                <activeByDefault>true</activeByDefault>
            </activation>
            <properties>
                <hibernate.dialect>org.hibernate.dialect.HSQLDialect</hibernate.dialect>
                <jdbc.driver>org.hsqldb.jdbcDriver</jdbc.driver>
                <jdbc.url>jdbc:hsqldb:hsql://localhost/test</jdbc.url>
                <jdbc.username>sa</jdbc.username>
                <app.datasource>dataSource</app.datasource>
                <jdbc.password />
                <jdbc.isolation />
            </properties>
        </profile>

       <profile>
            <id>hudson</id>
            <activation>
                <activeByDefault>true</activeByDefault>
            </activation>
            <properties>
                <hibernate.dialect>org.hibernate.dialect.HSQLDialect</hibernate.dialect>
                <jdbc.driver>org.hsqldb.jdbcDriver</jdbc.driver>
                <jdbc.url>jdbc:hsqldb:hsql://localhost/othertest</jdbc.url>
                <app.datasource>dataSource</app.datasource>
                <jdbc.username>sa</jdbc.username>
                <jdbc.password />

            </properties>
        </profile>

</profiles>

and this the configutarion of spring

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:context="http://www.springframework.org/schema/context"
    xmlns:jee="http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee"
        xmlns:p="http://www.springframework.org/schema/p"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
           http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-2.5.xsd
           http://www.springframework.org/schema/context
           http://www.springframework.org/schema/context/spring-context-2.5.xsd
           http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee/spring-jee-2.5.xsd">



    <!--Datasource pruebas" -->
        <bean id="dataSource" 
    	class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource"
    	destroy-method="close"
    	p:driverClassName="${jdbc.driver}"
    	p:url="${jdbc.url}"
    	p:username="${jdbc.username}"
    	p:password="${jdbc.password}" />



    <!-- La definición del Factory de Session con Anotaciones -->
    <bean id="sessionFactory"
    	class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.LocalSessionFactoryBean">
        <property name="dataSource" ref="${app.datasource}" />
        <property name="hibernateProperties">
            <props>
                <!--Pruebas
                <prop key="hibernate.dialect">org.hibernate.dialect.HSQLDialect</prop>-->
                <!--Produccion-->
                <prop key="hibernate.dialect">${hibernate.dialect}</prop>
                <prop key="hibernate.show_sql">true</prop>
                <prop key="hibernate.format_sql">true</prop>
            </props>
        </property>

        <property name="mappingResources">

            <list>
                <value>Test.hbm.xml</value>
            </list>

    <bean id="hibernateTemplate" class="org.springframework.orm.hibernate3.HibernateTemplate">
        <property name="sessionFactory">
            <ref bean="sessionFactory" />
        </property>
    </bean>



   <!--  Injected properties
    -->
    <bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
        <property name="locations">
        <list>
            <value>classpath:jdbc.properties</value>
        </list>
        </property>

    </bean>

And this work for normal datasources, but what if I need a lockup.

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3 Answers 3

IMO, you should go for two Spring configuration files, for example data-access.xml and data-access-test.xml, and use the later in a testing context. You can of course mix this approach with profiles and filtering, pickup one or the other depending on the profiles, etc. There are actually infinite possibilities.

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I had a situation a few months back where I had a Spring enabled JNDI connection for running on the app server and a Spring enabled c3p0 pooled connection for a desktop debugger of the same app.

In order to accomplish this, I had a two separate spring configs for the db. One for JNDI, and one for the local pooled version. I used a separate "parent" config which included the appropriate configuration based upon a filtered property in the parent config.

Long story short, use the profile to set the configuration file that you will include into your parent spring file.

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A simple, but very powerful option is to package different files with your application, i.e. different Spring configuration files.

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