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in Java, when using a for loop, you need to write a termination condition of course. This is my for loop:

for(int i=1; i<=infix.length()-2; i++){
            if(infix.charAt(i)==' '){
                infix=infix.substring(0,i)+infix.substring(i+1);
            }

(infix is a string i got as a parameter). As you can see, I'm using substring inside the loop, which shortens the length of infix, which means that the termination condition of the loop is changed after every single iteration.
My question is this: Is the value "infix.length-2" saved at the beginning of the for and doesn't change later on? Or it changes every time, and if so, what happens with i? When will the for stop? Is there a chance for an index out of bounds or something like that?
Thank you very much in advance! :D

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1  
The condition is re-evaluated every time. –  Kon Sep 8 '13 at 20:32
    
Note that you often can make such a loop work much more cleanly if you work from the "back" end towards the front, with decreasing index values. (One assumes here that the above is purely a "toy" example and that you'd use one of String's "replace" functions if doing this in "real life".) –  Hot Licks Sep 8 '13 at 21:06

5 Answers 5

The string length gets calculated every loop, and your for could throw an IndexOutOfBoundsException if your string becomes too short.

IMHO yours is a very bad practice, for loops are intended to make a determined number of loops and should never be stopped, also their stop condition should never be changed inside the loop, you should use a while if you don't know how many iterations you want to do. But this is my personal opinion :)

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Very personal, the JDK for example uses for loops in similar examples. So you either consider the whole standard library as written in a very bad code style or admit that it comes down to personal preference (personally I prefer while loops too). –  Voo Sep 8 '13 at 20:45
    
@Voo It's explicitly written in the answer, this is my personal opinion on that. I don't know if the JDK uses to break for loops and redefine the stop condition every loop, if it does then yes, i think it's written in a vary bad code style, but it's still my personal opinion. I would use while loops instead. –  BackSlash Sep 8 '13 at 20:53
    
Oh yes, just wanted to make it clear that there are some very reputable sources out there who don't follow that advice and that there is nothing really wrong with it. –  Voo Sep 8 '13 at 21:33

Yes, you can change the upper limit. No, it's not cached at the beginning of the loop. Yes, anything you do wrong might cause errors -- but this is neither especially dangerous or uncommon. On the contrary, it's quite common.

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you can put multiple end criteria in a for loop, just for a sample syntax

for(int i = 0; i < 2 || i< 5; i++)
  System.out.println(i);
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As a short hint: Your for-loop is equivalent to the following while-loop

{
    int i=1;
    while(i<=infix.length()-2) {
        if(infix.charAt(i)==' '){
            infix=infix.substring(0,i)+infix.substring(i+1);
        }
        i++
    }
}   

That means the condition of a the for-loop is evaluated in the same way as the condition of a while-loop. There is nothing special about it.

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My question is this: Is the value "infix.length-2" saved at the beginning of the for and doesn't change later on? Or it changes every time, and if so, what happens with i? 

It changes with every iteration of the for loop. i gets incremented, with each iteration.

When will the for stop? Is there a chance for an index out of bounds or something like that?

The for loop will stop when the termination condition is true.

i<=infix.length()-2. 

i initialized to 1 will result in a loop that terminates if the length

If you modify the termination condition variables with incorrect logic, then you have a chance of running into an infinite loop.

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