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In this program i want to goto a particular location in the file and read there.

If it is space there i will write my buffer there else i want to search for the next "empty space". Now the problem is with those lines where I have written in comments put 2 lines under comment from here. If I include those lines my output file is blank. If I remove those 2 lines it is writing correctly in the file. But I want to read before writing.

And by those 2 lines of code, I can read. So can you suggest me any alternate way of reading so that buffer file goes into output file after reading and not remains blank.

Or what am I doing wrong here?

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
#include<string>
using namespace std;
//moving the seekp pointer of the fstream
void seek_key(fstream &fout,int k){
    if(k==0)
        fout.seekp(0,ios::beg);
    else{
        k=((k*2)-1)+(k*42);
        fout.seekp(k,ios::beg);
    }
}
//moving the seekg pointer of fstream
void seec_key(fstream &fout,int k){
    if(k==0)
        fout.seekg(0,ios::beg);
    else{
        k=((k*2)-1)+(k*42);
        fout.seekg(k,ios::beg);
    }
}
//to put n spaces in the file so that later i can put record in that location
//actually doing hashing files
void make_file(fstream &fout,int n){
    int i;
    i=n;
    i--;
    while(i>0){
        for(int j=0;j<42;j++)
        fout<<" ";
        fout<<"\n";
        i--;
    }   
}

struct student{
    string roll;
    string name;
    string cgpa;
};
class buffer{
    public:
    string buf;
    void pack(student s);
    void unpack(istream fin,student s);
};
void buffer::pack(student s){
    buf=s.roll;
    buf=buf+"|";
    buf=buf+s.name;
    buf=buf+"|";
    buf=buf+s.cgpa;
    buf=buf+"|";
}
//cin overloading to get input into student structure
istream &operator >> (istream &in,student &s){
    cout<<"enter student name: ";
    in>>s.name;
    cout<<"enter student roll: ";
    in>>s.roll;
    cout<<"enter cpga: ";
    in>>s.cgpa;
}
//for adding student buffer into the file
void add(fstream &fout,buffer &b,student &s,int k){

    int key=atoi(s.roll.c_str());
    int v=key%k;

    char test;
    seek_key(fout,v);
    seec_key(fout,v);
    // put 2 lines under comments from here 
    fout>>test;
    cout<<"this is test."<<test<<".test"<<endl;
    fout<<b.buf;

}
int main(){
    student s;
    buffer b;
    fstream fout;
    fout.open("hash.txt");
    int n;
    cout<<"enter the no. of records: ";
    cin>>n;
    make_file(fout,n);
    char ans;
    do{
        cin>>s;
        b.pack(s);

        add(fout,b,s,n);

        cout<<"to enter more students press y else n";
        cin>>ans;
    }while(ans=='y'||ans=='Y');
    fout.close();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Basically, you have this code:

fout>>test;     // line 1
                // code not using fout removed
fout<<b.buf;    // line 2

Basically, this means you are reading and writing without intervening seek: This is undefined behavior! File stream's state can be described by a state machine:

initial -> unbound
unbound + write    -> write mode
write mode + write -> write mode
write mode + seek  -> unbound
write mode + read  -> undefined behavior
unbound + read     -> read mode
read mode + read   -> read mode
read mode + seek   -> unbound
read mode + write  -> undefined behavior

There are a few reasons why it is undefined behavior to read in write mode or to write in read mode:

  1. Performance: the internal buffers need to be set up appropriately which is a non-trivial operation and checking for the correct unnecessarily slows down the operations.
  2. The appropriate stream position the user expects is entirely unclear. Best have the user clarify the expectations.
  3. When using a non-trivial conversion it may be necessary to write the end of a shift sequence in write mode. This shouldn't be triggered by an implicit operation, i.e., the user should better be aware of (of course, I doubt many users are aware that a seek operation may write the end of a shift sequence).

Anyway: seeking to the appropriate location where you actually want to write your data should fix the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
even if i add seek_key(fout,v); after fout>>test; to move the seekp it is going to -1 and not going according to my function seek_key.What is wrong now? – dann_ Sep 8 '13 at 22:27
    
@user2718205: was the read successful (you should verify that all read operations are successful anyway)? Otherwise the stream went into failure mode (elided from the state diagram...) at which point it won't do anything until the error state is clear()ed. – Dietmar Kühl Sep 8 '13 at 22:32
    
now it is working fine after doing clear(). Thanks. – dann_ Sep 8 '13 at 22:51

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