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Can anyone help with this exersise?

Write a program which asks the user for the base and height of a right angled triangle, calculates its area and prints it to the screen. The interaction should look something like:

The base?
3.3
The height?
5.4
The area of that triangle is 8.91

Solved with:

getTriArea :: IO Float
getTriArea = do
 putStr "The base? "
 base <- getLine
 putStr "The height? "
 height <- getLine
 let ar = ( (read base :: Float) * (read height :: Float) )/ 2
 return ar

main = do 
 result <- getTriArea
 putStr $ "The area of that triangle is " ++ show result
share|improve this question
4  
What have you attempted so far? –  Jeff Foster Dec 8 '09 at 18:40
    
That Haskell IO with floats and numbers have already distroyed my mind, but I've got an answer. So I guess it's solved now –  Roman Shestakov Dec 8 '09 at 19:18
    
Then click the check mark next to one of the answers. –  Jason Orendorff Dec 9 '09 at 0:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

What you have works, but it is better Haskell style to separate pure from IO. Your getTriArea computation doesn't need to be locked up in the IO monad: lift it out!

import Control.Applicative

prompt :: (Read a) => String -> IO a
prompt s = putStr s >> read <$> getLine

triArea :: (Fractional a) => a -> a -> a
triArea base height = (base * height) / 2

main :: IO ()
main = do
    area <- triArea <$> prompt "The base? " <*> prompt "The height? "
    putStrLn $ "The area of that triangle is " ++ show (area :: Float)

Applicative isn't actually necessary, it just provides a few pretty infix operators. Monad works just fine.

import Control.Monad

prompt :: (Read a) => String -> IO a
prompt s = putStr s >> fmap read getLine

triArea :: (Fractional a) => a -> a -> a
triArea base height = (base * height) / 2

main :: IO ()
main = do  -- pick one of the following two lines
    area <- liftM2 triArea (prompt "The base? ") (prompt "The height? ")
    area <- return triArea `ap` prompt "The base? " `ap` prompt "The height? "
    putStrLn $ "The area of that triangle is " ++ show (area :: Float)

In a short program like this, it doesn't really matter all that much, but note that even those imports, the triArea definition can remain pure.

prompt :: (Read a) => String -> IO a
prompt s = putStr s >> getLine >>= return . read

triArea :: (Fractional a) => a -> a -> a
triArea base height = (base * height) / 2

main :: IO ()
main = do
    base <- prompt "The base? "
    height <- prompt "The height? "
    let area = triArea base height
    putStrLn $ "The area of that triangle is " ++ show (area :: Float)
share|improve this answer
getTriArea :: IO Float
getTriArea = do
 putStr "The base? "
 base <- getLine
 putStr "The height? "
 height <- getLine
 let ar = ( (read base :: Float) * (read height :: Float) )/ 2
 return ar

main = do 
 result <- getTriArea
 putStr $ "The area of that triangle is " ++ show result
share|improve this answer
1  
The type annotations and parens on those reads are redundant. You can just write read base * read height / 2. Function application is left-associative. –  Chuck Dec 8 '09 at 19:40

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