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Is there any reason to write:

double pop(void)
{
    if (sp > 0)
        return val[--sp];
    else {
        printf("error: stack empty\n");
        return 0.0;
    }
}

instead of:

double pop(void)
{
    if (sp > 0)
        return val[--sp];

    printf("error: stack empty\n");
    return 0.0;
}

apart from style? Won't the return stop the function?

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Mihai Maruseac, rici, Bryan Chen, Jonathan Leffler, Grijesh Chauhan Sep 9 '13 at 4:59

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
@mbratch - It's just your opinion that it's a matter of opinion. ;) – Hot Licks Sep 9 '13 at 0:23
    
@Hotlicks, well... you are entitled to your opinion (+1). :) – lurker Sep 9 '13 at 0:26
    
I am not sure if compilers do any optimizations for these snippets, but I am guessing that the second one is better, branching is expensive if I'm not mistaken. You don't have the else branch, so the compiler will think that it's a normal flow for your program(I am also using this style, too). – Silviu Burcea Sep 9 '13 at 6:47
    
@SilviuBurcea - Most compilers will generate the same code (or nearly the same) for both. – Hot Licks Sep 9 '13 at 11:09
up vote 10 down vote accepted

As others said, they are equivalent, but typically the idiom is that the execution flows through the end of the function in the "regular case", while exceptional cases get out early (this has its roots in the fact that otherwise, in languages without exceptions, you get a million nested braces for code with many error checks).

So, probably I would reverse the condition and write:

double pop(void)
{
    // First parameters/preconditions/... checks
    if (sp <= 0)
    {
        // Exceptional case, get out early
        printf("error: stack empty\n");
        return 0.;
    }
    // We get here if everything is ok - regular case
    return val[--sp];
}

Incidentally, when writing a generic stack function with this signature probably I would return something more significant than 0. in case of stack underflow - probably a NaN or something like that (if supported by the platform).

share|improve this answer

They are both the same thing. The second snippet is easier to read since it has less lexical constructs and if the if condition is shorter. Otherwise, they both have the same apprehension difficulty.

Depending on the context you might want the former or the later. It all depends on the semantics you wish your code to convey.

For example if one of the branches is an exceptional case (error or base case for a recursive function) you'd use the later form. But if both cases have the same semantics (alternatives with almost equal chances of occuring/significance) you'd use the former snippet.

Thus, you'll write

int factorial (int x)
{
    if (x <= 1)
        return 1;
    return x * factorial (x - 1);
}

and

int act_on_contents_of_file(char *fname)
{
    FILE *f = fopen(fname, "r");
    if (f == NULL) { /* error opening */
        perror(...);
        return -1;
    }
    ....
    return 0;
}

While you'll write

int collatz(int x)
{
    if (x % 2 == 0)
        return collatz(x / 2);
    else
        return collatz(3 * x + 1);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
" The second snippet is easier to read since it has less lexical constructs". That is not true in absolute. The first snippet forces you to read the content of the if body while the second doesn't. You skip an else to gain a return. – Jack Sep 9 '13 at 0:26
    
I've reworded it to convey my meaning. – Mihai Maruseac Sep 9 '13 at 0:30
    
The collatz snippet will result in a Stack Overflow Error. We all know that it will go down to 1 and it will enter on the else branch, making it 4, and after 2 if branches, you will return to 1. Add a if (x == 1) return 1; (you will also want the chain length instead of returning 1 everytime, consider adding a 1 + before your current returns. – Silviu Burcea Sep 9 '13 at 6:42
    
No stack overflow if we use tail-call optimization. And the conjecture is not in any way related with the length of the chain. – Mihai Maruseac Sep 9 '13 at 11:20

They are equivalent. The first version emphasizes that there are just two conditions, but the second achieves the same result.

The printf() should be an fprintf() reporting the error to stderr, not stdout; that is what the error channel is for.

share|improve this answer

They're equivalent in your example and both will compile to same binary. The difference is just taste. With the first example is clear that there is a condition which is executed if the if is false.

The second one has just this downside: without reading the body of the if clause, especially if it's long, you can't be sure when last code is called without studying the whole content of the body (think about nested scopes with some branches that doesn't return while other return).

share|improve this answer
    
It should be pointed out that a return from the middle of a routine is (to use that yucky hoity-toity term) "code smell". While it's appropriate in some cases it's not so in general. And when it's done it often best to take extra steps in the visual structuring of the code to make it obvious. Coding the else with a return helps ever so slightly (though simply setting a return var and having both sides return via a single point at the end would be better in general). – Hot Licks Sep 9 '13 at 0:25
1  
@HotLicks: If the alternative is double pop(void) { double rv = 0.0; if (sp > 0) rv = val[--sp]; else fprintf(stderr, "error: stack empty\n"); return rv; }, then I think I prefer the smelly code. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '13 at 0:26
    
@JonathanLeffler - Well, I never want to see if/else clauses without {}, so there! – Hot Licks Sep 9 '13 at 0:30
1  
@HotLicks: Fine — let's just agree to disagree on that one, swiftly. If we're not careful, we'll discuss the placement of braces, and then think what a mess there'll be. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '13 at 0:32
1  
Thankfully I haven't had to use braces for about 45 years. – Hot Licks Sep 9 '13 at 0:33

The preferred snippet is the one you get paid the most to code. Which means your shop should have programming standards and just such an example should be discussed in those standards.

share|improve this answer

They are both the same thing. Neither snippet is preferable to the other without knowing the context of the code you're writing.

share|improve this answer
    
You, of course have the correct answer. There are times when either style may be preferred, and times when it's hard to pick which. – Hot Licks Sep 9 '13 at 0:22

They are both the same thing. The first snippet is preferable.

share|improve this answer
    
Care to say why is the first snippet preferable? I have seen the 2nd one more often, I'm also using it quite often. Is there any magic behind 1st one or is a matter of taste? – Silviu Burcea Sep 9 '13 at 6:50
    
@SilviuBurcea - It was a direct quote (with "first" replacing "second") of Mihai's original answer (which has been greatly expanded since). The point is that it's not a black-and-white issue -- there are cases where either might be better, cases where something else entirely should be used. (And in general one should be leery of a return from inside an if, except for clearly-defined "early out" cases.) – Hot Licks Sep 9 '13 at 11:05

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