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Given a plain-old-data C++ class or struct composed of types that implement operator+:

struct VertexData
{
    Vec4 vertex;
    Vec2 texCoord;
};

Is it possible to use templates or some other trick to get the C++ compiler to automatically generate operator+ that adds each member, like this?

VertexData operator+(VertexData const &a, VertexData const &b)
{
     VertexData sum;
     sum.vertex = a.vertex + b.vertex;
     sum.texCoord = a.texCoord + b.texCoord;
     return sum;
}
share|improve this question
4  
One (slightly inconvenient) way, would be to stick all the member variables in a tuple and inherit from a template that assumes you have this tuple and it would generate an operator+ which basically iterates over the tuple and adds all of the elements member wise. Otherwise you'd probably need a reflection mechanism, which C++ doesn't have. –  Borgleader Sep 9 '13 at 3:18
    
@Borgleader only slightly =P, but it does solve the "where's my member variables" problem that makes this otherwise... difficult. +1, sir. –  WhozCraig Sep 9 '13 at 3:19
    
@WhozCraig If you're interested in a working example, I posted a variant of this idea below :) –  Borgleader Sep 9 '13 at 5:25

4 Answers 4

Disclaimer this is more or less "automatic".

I hope you like templates ;) (Also this requires C++11, most notably because it uses tuples and variadic templates.)

Also, I'd like to thank Rapptz for solving my recursion/iteration over tuple with the indices trick.

So, this is a mix of two ideas I had. The first is the one I posted in the comments earlier. The problem with that idea is that you're restricted to putting all your member variables in a tuple which is very inconvenient. I had another idea which didn't pan out because it involved circular dependency with the Adder template.

So the final idea is you inherit from the adder template which assumes you have a static member variable (of type tuple) in which you put pointers to the member variables you want to add. And the default implementation you inherit creates a new variable of type T, iterates over the parameter the tuple and does member wise addition on them.

You can see it in action here. Do note, you should be able to add support for tostring (or operator <<) the same way as operator+ (instead of manually as I did) and the same for construction from initializer-list.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <type_traits>
#include <tuple>

template<size_t... Ns>
struct indices {};

template<size_t N, size_t... Ns>
struct build_indices : build_indices<N-1, N-1, Ns...> {};

template<size_t... Ns>
struct build_indices<0, Ns...> : indices<Ns...> {};

template<typename T, typename Tuple, size_t... Indices>
void memberWiseSum(T& lhs, T& rhs, T& sum, const Tuple& typeInfo, indices<Indices...>)
{
    using expander = int[];
    (void)expander{((sum.*std::get<Indices>(typeInfo) = lhs.*std::get<Indices>(typeInfo) + rhs.*std::get<Indices>(typeInfo)), 0)...};
}

template<typename T>
struct Adder
{
    T operator+(Adder<T>& rhs)
    {
        T sum;
        memberWiseSum(*static_cast<T*>(this), *static_cast<T*>(&rhs), *static_cast<T*>(&sum), T::typeInfo, build_indices<std::tuple_size<decltype(T::typeInfo)>::value>{});

        return sum;
    }
};

struct Vec4: public Adder<Vec4>
{
    float x,y,z,w;

    std::string toString()
    {
        return "{" + std::to_string(x) + ", " + std::to_string(y) + ", " + std::to_string(z) + ", " + std::to_string(w) + "}";
    }

    const static std::tuple<decltype(&Vec4::x), decltype(&Vec4::y), decltype(&Vec4::z), decltype(&Vec4::w)> typeInfo;
};

decltype(Vec4::typeInfo) Vec4::typeInfo(&Vec4::x, &Vec4::y, &Vec4::z, &Vec4::w);

struct Vec2: public Adder<Vec2>
{
    float x,y;

    std::string toString()
    {
        return "{" + std::to_string(x) + ", " + std::to_string(y) + "}";
    }

    const static std::tuple<decltype(&Vec2::x), decltype(&Vec2::y)> typeInfo;
};

decltype(Vec2::typeInfo) Vec2::typeInfo(&Vec2::x, &Vec2::y);

struct VertexData: public Adder<VertexData>
{
    Vec4 vertex;
    Vec2 texCoord;

    std::string toString()
    {
        return "{" + vertex.toString() + ", " + texCoord.toString() + "}";
    }

    const static std::tuple<decltype(&VertexData::vertex), decltype(&VertexData::texCoord)> typeInfo;
};

decltype(VertexData::typeInfo) VertexData::typeInfo(&VertexData::vertex, &VertexData::texCoord);

int main()
{
    VertexData vd1; vd1.vertex.x = 1; vd1.vertex.y = 2; vd1.vertex.z = 3; vd1.vertex.w = 4;
    vd1.texCoord.x = 5; vd1.texCoord.y = 6;
    VertexData vd2; vd2.vertex.x = 1; vd2.vertex.y = 2; vd2.vertex.z = 3; vd2.vertex.w = 4;
    vd2.texCoord.x = 5; vd2.texCoord.y = 6;
    VertexData vd3 = vd1 + vd2;
    std::cout << vd3.toString() << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Finally, as mentioned in the comments and by Yakk a truly automatic solution would require a reflection system (much like what C# has) but that is for the moment not present in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 awesome typeInfo trick: but I'd write auto_tie that takes one of your typeInfo and an instance generates a tuple-of-references (a std::tie(...). I personally would find working with a tie of references-to-members easier and more idiomatic than your typeInfo of pointers-to-member variables. And naturally you should write += as a method, and + as a free function. –  Yakk Sep 9 '13 at 14:02
    
@Yakk thanks for the std::tie suggestion, I'll look it up. I'm relatively new to C++11 features so this was more of a proof of concept. –  Borgleader Sep 9 '13 at 14:05

No, doing this requires (at least) compile-time reflection, the ability to write code that is aware of the list of member variables of a class.

There isn't any such construct in C++. There are a number of proposals to add compile-time reflection into C++, and they may be showing up in C++17.

If you changed your type so that the data, instead of being stored in member variables, it is stored in a structure that can be compile time reflected, then this can be done.

As an example, std::tuple is an ordered tuple of typed data. The data stored in a std::tuple can be reflected on, and with a bit of work operators that do what you ask could be written that would work. If instead of storing your data in member variables, you stored it in a tuple either by inheritance or by composition, your problem could be solved.

You could also write your own reflection lite: if you wrote a member function that returned std::tie( each member variable in turn ), that would give you limited reflection on the contents of your structure. Writing an operator+ that would operate on any class that provided such a member function wouldn't be hard.

Now, this involves writing almost as much code as writing an actual operator+, but as a bonus the same tie function can be used for other operations (be it < or == or - or *). I'd advise using or CRTP to flag which operations you want to be auto-generated, then use SFINAE operators to do the actual work, if you go this route. A traits class could also work (or, use CRTP and a traits class, where the default traits class uses the CRTP, but you can implement your own). The only concern I'd have with a traits class solution is the lack of ADL on the operators: you'd have to manually pull them in I suspect?

As a final aside, it is often considered a good idea to implement operator+= as a member function, then write a free binary operator+ that is implemented using +=.

share|improve this answer

As others have said, you can't do this completely automatically because C++ doesn't have reflection. However, you can get a lot of functionality if you are willing to implement a member function that visits all the member pointers. Here's an example that not only generates operator+, but operator+=, operator==, and operator< as well:

#include <assert.h>

// Base class for classes that have a visitMembers method.
template <typename Derived>
struct MemberVisitable {
  operator Derived&() { return static_cast<Derived&>(*this); }
  operator const Derived&() const { return static_cast<const Derived&>(*this); }

  protected:
    MemberVisitable() { } // Force this class to be used only as a base class.
};


// Define operator< for MemberVisitables
////////////////////////////////////////
template <typename T>
struct CompareLess {
  const T &a;
  const T &b;
  bool &result;

  template <typename U>
  bool operator()(U T::*member) const
  {
    const U& x = a.*member;
    const U& y = b.*member;
    if (x<y) {
      result = true;
      return false;
    }
    if (y<x) {
      result = false;
      return false;
    }
    return true;
  }
};

template <typename Derived>
inline bool
  operator<(
    const MemberVisitable<Derived> &a1,
    const MemberVisitable<Derived> &a2
  )
{
  bool result = false;
  CompareLess<Derived> visitor = {a1,a2,result};
  Derived::visitMembers(visitor);
  return result;
}


// Addition
///////////
template <typename T>
struct AddTo {
  T &a;
  const T &b;

  template <typename U>
  bool operator()(U T::*member) const
  {
    (a.*member) += (b.*member);
    return true;
  }
};

template <typename Derived>
inline Derived
  operator+(
    const MemberVisitable<Derived> &a1,
    const MemberVisitable<Derived> &a2
  )
{
  Derived result = a1;
  AddTo<Derived> visitor = {result,a2};
  Derived::visitMembers(visitor);
  return result;
}

template <typename Derived>
Derived&
  operator+=(
    MemberVisitable<Derived> &a1,
    const MemberVisitable<Derived> &a2
  )
{
  AddTo<Derived> visitor = {a1,a2};
  Derived::visitMembers(visitor);
  return a1;
}


// Equality
/////////////
template <typename T>
struct CompareEqual {
  const T &a;
  const T &b;

  template <typename U>
  bool operator()(U T::*member) const
  {
    return (a.*member) == (b.*member);
  }
};

template <typename Derived>
bool
  operator==(
    const MemberVisitable<Derived> &a1,
    const MemberVisitable<Derived> &a2
  )
{
  CompareEqual<Derived> visitor = {a1,a2};
  return Derived::visitMembers(visitor);
}


// Test with our own struct
/////////////////////////////

struct A : MemberVisitable<A> {
  float b;
  int c;

  A(float b,int c) : b(b), c(c) { }

  template <typename Visitor>
  static bool visitMembers(const Visitor &visit)
  {
    return visit(&A::b) && visit(&A::c);
  }
};

int main(int,char**)
{
  A a1(1,2);
  A a2(3,5);
  assert(a1<a2);
  assert(!(a2<a1));
  assert(!(a1<a1));
  A a3 = a1+a2;
  assert(a3.b==4);
  assert(a3.c==7);
  a1 += a2;
  assert(a1==a3);
}

This can easily be extended to most anything that needs to work over all members.

share|improve this answer

No, it's not possible.

C++ templates are very weak and it's for example absolutely impossible to do anything that includes enumerating all members of a class.

Over the years some very smart guys tried to circumnvent the C++ template system limitations and they were able for example to add simulated data structures (with type lists), simulated loops (with recursion), simulated conditionals (using SFINAE).

The fact remains that C++ template metaprogramming is "template" metaprogramming and it was not designed with compile-time algorithms in mind but just as a slightly better template-based substitution than C macros. Even C++11 adds basically nothing to that.

For some strange circus effect ("hey mom, look at what I can do anyway") this kind of fighting got sort of popular and even now you can find apparently smart guys still struggling for countless hours on solving metaprogramming problems without using proper tools, just to show that they can.

This of course can only give back half-working overcomplex bad solutions that also really stress the compilers and for example is common to get screenfuls of nonsense babbling instead of a clear error message when you make a mistake using those brittle constructions.

Indeed the problem those complex machineries are trying to solve are for the most part non-exsitent and just self imposed by choosing a poor metaprogramming language. If you like that kind of programming may be it would be even better to go all the way in that direction and leave C++ to write applications directly in brainfuck using notepad.

If instead you really need to solve metaprogramming problems then probably an external C++ generator is the way to go (or you can move away from C++ to a language with serious support for metaprogramming).

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Well, there are many cases where template metaprogramming does give a clear benefit. (This Q&A is probably not one, IMO.) For example, most implementations of std::function. And how something is implemented is much less important than how easy it is to use. –  aschepler Sep 9 '13 at 13:57
    
@aschepler: there are things for which C++ metaprogramming perfectly cuts it, like std::vector. This should come at no surprise because it was what templates were created for. But when you need any kind of real compile-time computation and data structures or when you need any introspection it shows all its design limits. Having limits is not bad... what is bad is ignoring them and keeping insisting on abusing a tool so beyond its reach. One step at a time you may find yourself with nonsense like boost.spirit. –  6502 Sep 9 '13 at 14:41

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