Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have this simple F# function:

let compareNum x =

    let y = 10

    match x with

    | _ when x = y -> 0

    | _ when x > y -> 1

    | _ when x < y -> -1

However, F# compiler gives me "Incomplete pattern matches on this expression" warning. In this case, all cases should cover every pattern.

I also see a similar example in "Pattern Matching" section in the 1st edition of Programming F# book by Chris Smith. So something might be changed in the later version of F#?

share|improve this question
6  
The compiler assumes that any code with when guards is an incomplete match. It is inelegant, and produces false positives like you saw. –  John Palmer Sep 9 '13 at 4:57
    
possible duplicate of Incomplete pattern matching a tuple in F# –  John Palmer Sep 9 '13 at 4:58
1  
Thanks! I like how one of the answer in the above question said, "In general, it is an anti-pattern to have a when guard in the last pattern." I think that makes sense now. –  kimsk Sep 9 '13 at 5:09
2  
This is one of those cases where using "if" is not only more idiomatic--it's also a far better way to code the test. –  Onorio Catenacci Sep 9 '13 at 16:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think the answer to the previous question (and the comments) explain the situation.

However, I would not say that having a guard in the last pattern is an anti-pattern - it is the easiest workaround, but I find this somewhat unfortunate, because the when pattern gives you useful information about the values you can expect - and that makes understanding the program easier. Last time I had this problem, I left it there, at least as a comment:

let compareNum x =
  let y = 10
  match x with
  | _ when x = y -> 0
  | _ when x > y -> 1
  | _ (*when x < y*) -> -1
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks! That's really nice suggestion. –  kimsk Sep 9 '13 at 14:25
    
+1, if you had the equality check -> 0 as the final pattern it might go some way towards preserving readability without the comment - but personally I think I like this better. –  MattDavey Sep 9 '13 at 14:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.