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My method exist­s_else takes two parameters: base and fallback. If base is nil, it returns fallback. If it's not nil, it returns base. A call to exist­s_else(true, false) should return true.

If I use a standard looking if-statement, true is returned like I thought it would be:

def exist­s_else(bas­e, fallb­ack)
  unless base.­nil?
    base
  else
    fallb­ack
  end
end

a = true
exists_els­e( a, false­ )
# => true

If I use the inline implementation shown below, it returns false.

def exist­s_else(base, fallback)
  base unles­s base.nil­? else fallback
end

a = true
exists_els­e( a, false­ )
# => false

Why does does it return false in the inline implementation?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your assertion that

base unles­s base.nil­? else fallback

is supposed to be equivalent to the long-form unless statement is not true; in fact, you cannot use else inside a post condition. Ruby is interpreting the code as:

def exist­s_else(base, fallback)
  base unles­s base.nil­?
else fallback
end

If you type this (or the version without the newline, as in your question) into IRB, Ruby gives the following warning:

warning: else without rescue is useless

That is to say, Ruby is trying to interpret the else as part of exception handling code, as in

def exists_else(base, fallback)
  base unless base.nil
rescue ArgumentError => e
  # code to handle ArgumentError here
else
  # code to handle other exceptions here
end
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Better answer than mine. More detail. –  MitulP91 Sep 9 '13 at 5:04
3  
And this is why you should read warnings. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 9 '13 at 13:09

You can not use an else statement when you're trying to do it in one line. When an else is necessary you must use the extended version.

Ruby thinks that the else in this case is related to error handling. You have to stick to your initial unless-end method.

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I prefer this syntax to evaluate true/false checks:

condition(s) ? true_value : false_value

In your case, it would look like:

def exists_else(base, fallback)
  base.nil? ? fallback : base
end

a = true
puts exists_else(a, false)  # => true
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