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I've written this hello world in hello.c:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  printf("Hello, World!\n");
  exit( 0 );
}

my Makefile is:

%: %.c

When I run make I will get this error: make: *** No targets. Stop.

share|improve this question
1  
Your program won't compile, as exit() is defined in stdlib.h which you're not even including. Second, if this is all you really need to compile, just type make hello. Gnu make will automagically build this for you with the default libs, headers, and compilation (though it may get confused if you have a hello.c, hello.cpp, and hello.java all in the same folder.) – WhozCraig Sep 9 '13 at 6:44
    
Yes I know how to make a simple program by running make targetname But in this question I've simplified my origin problem. I want to know why writing %: %.c rule doesn't work here? – Milad Khajavi Sep 9 '13 at 6:50
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your makefile provides a rule %: %.c specifying that it's extensionless executables and .c files that you're interested in (in fact, just the built-in rules do that much), but gives no hint that there's a source file named hello.c or a target named hello.

When you type make by itself, make takes the first target listed in the makefile as the target to be made, but your makefile contains no targets whatsoever, hence No targets. Stop. In short, make has no clue that there is anything nearby with a name like hello*.

With your makefile as is, typing make hello will do what you want, as it tells make what it is that you'd like to build.

If you tell make about hello, you'll also be able to type just make to do what you want:

hello: hello.c

%: %.c

or more idiomatically and flexibly, you would list all your "top-level" targets in an all target:

all: hello

%: %.c

.PHONY: all
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2  
This is the best answer to the question asked. – MadScientist Sep 9 '13 at 11:45

Typical c hello world prgram:

hello.c:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  printf("Hello, World!\n");
  return  0;
}

Typical Makefile, short but complete:

Makefile:

all: hello

hello: hello.o
    gcc -o "$@" hello.o
hello.o: hello.c 
    g++ -c hello.c

.PHONY:clean

clean:
    rm *.o hello

Example with pattern rules:

all: hello

hello: hello.o
    gcc -o "$@" hello.o
%.o: %.c
    gcc -c $<

.PHONY:clean

clean:
    rm *.o hello

Example with delimiter(\n as enter, \t as tab):

all: hello\n

hello: hello.o\n
\tgcc -o "$@" hello.o
%.o: %.c\n
\tgcc -c $<

.PHONY:clean

clean:\n
\trm *.o hello
share|improve this answer
    
hi @lulyon, thank. Cloud you please help me to write this make file by automatic variable and pattern rules? – Milad Khajavi Sep 9 '13 at 6:53
    
@Khajavi OK. (%.o: %.c\n\t gcc -c $<) This can be used to generate object file. – lulyon Sep 9 '13 at 7:00
    
it doesn't work: error: make: *** No targets. Stop. – Milad Khajavi Sep 9 '13 at 7:04
    
@Khajavi Take care of delimiter. It is OK on mine. – lulyon Sep 9 '13 at 7:09
    
@Khajavi See updated example with delimiter. – lulyon Sep 9 '13 at 7:14

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